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Biography of Amanda J. Weathers

Amanda J. Hammock.–The estimable and gracious lady whose name appears above is one of the worthy class who opened this section of the country for the ingress of civilization’s ways and for the abode of man, having been obliged to labor hard in this undertaking and having accomplished praise-worthy achievements, while her efforts to-day demonstrate her capable and upright and possessed of a sagacity and keenness of perception and ability to execute designs that makes her a very valuable resident of union county, where she is highly esteemed as she has always been. Amanda was born in Wayne county, Iowa, in 1848, and there received a good common-school education and remained until seventeen years of age and then married Mr. George See, the year being 1865. The husband became enamored of the western regions and they started for the Willamette valley with ox teams in that year. The journey was fraught with much hardship and trouble with the Indians, although none were killed. On Green River they met up with an old acquaintance of our subjects father who told them of the Grande Ronde valley, and they determined to stop here. When they drew their “Prairie Schooner” up to La Grande they were not possessed of any capital except brave hearts and willing hands to do whatever they could find. Accordingly they went to work for W. Proebstel on the latter’s farm, the husband receiving three dollars and fifty cents per day, and our subject one dollar per day for cooking. Six months were consumed in this way and they removed to La Grande, securing a team and the...

Bryant, Amanda J. – Obituary

Following is an obituary for Amanda J. Hammack, for the purpose of information, you the reader must be aware of Amanda’s marriages or this obituary could be confusing. As far so far Amanda J. had six husbands (subject to change) they are: George W. See  m. 1868, C.A. Anderson  m. 1875, John A. Childers m. 1878, Joseph Weathers  m. 1895,  Mr. Bryant  m. ?,   William T. Grider  m. ?. There is some question of her marriage to William T. Grider, he doesn’t seem to belong to Amanda J. Obituary for Amanda J. Bryant Mrs. Bryant Dead. Well known Citizen of This County  Indigestion Victim At 1:15 this morning Mrs. J. A. Childers Bryant, aged 68 years and 12 days, died at 1514 Jefferson of acute indigestion. The deceased was born in Wayne County, Iowa, April 26, 1848 and was married to J.A. Childers, January 6th, 1878. Mr. Childers dies in 1893. The funeral will be held from the Christian Church Thursday at 2 o’clock preceded by a short service at the home at 1: o’clock. She was the last of a family of 10, her parents are both dead. Her children who survive her are Grace and Joanna, the former of this city and the latter of Portland, Oregon. Mrs. Bryant was a pioneer Oregonian. She came to the Willamette valley in 1863, coming west with an ox team train. After living there for a time the family moved to the Grande Ronde valley and Mrs. Bryant made her home in this county continuously since that date. Amanda has been the mother of seven children, four being dead and the...

Biographical Sketch of James L. Chapman

James L. Chapman is a native of West Virginia, born near Manchester, Hancock County, in the widely quoted “Pan-handle district,” March 23, 1818, and there he was reared, educated, and lived until the 5th of April, 1854. In that year he migrated to the “land of the Hawkeye,” settling in Jefferson county, but remained in that county only till the following fall, then removed to Wayne county, Iowa, and there continued to live and engage in farming until 1864, when he made his home in Missouri, locating in Harrison county. Six years he pursued farming avocations in that county, then removed to Daviess county and settled in Salem township, where he farmed until 1876, and then engaged in the mercantile and hotel business, at Coffeysburg, with his son, William A., under the firm name of Chapman & Son, continuing the business until 1880, when they sold out and came to Gallatin and engaged in the hotel business, for six months, then dissolved partnership. Mr. Chapman then purchased his present fruit farm on the southern limits of Gallatin, where he is engaged in the growing and cultivating of the excellent fruits indigenous to the soil of Daviess county, having made fruit culture a study since early boyhood. He has one hundred and eleven apple trees, two hundred peach trees, two cherry trees, thirty pear trees, beside strawberries, gooseberries, and one acre in Concord grapes. Mr. Chapman was united in matrimony, on the 10th of May, 1849, to Miss Nancy J. Daugherty, of Pennsylvania. They became the parents of six children; named, respectively, William A., now residing in Kansas; Francis M.,...

Biography of James Wilson

James Wilson, deceased, was for many years one of the leading farmers and stockmen of Idaho, and during his residence in this state did as much as any other man in the commonwealth in the interests of agriculture and stock raising. He is properly classed among the pioneers of Idaho, for his residence dated from 1864, and from that time until his death he took an active part in the conduct of business interests that resulted to the benefit of the state, as well as to his individual prosperity. A native of Washington County, Indiana, he was born May 15, 1826, his parents being Jesse and Sarah (McCoy) Wilson. The father was born near Morgantown, Virginia, May 17, 1800, and removed to Washington County, Indiana, during the pioneer period in the history of that state. His death occurred in Grande Ronde valley, Oregon, in the fall of 1863, but his wife, who was likewise a native of the Old Dominion, died in Washington County, Indiana, in 1828. When seven years of age James Wilson removed from his native County to Vigo County, Indiana, where he resided until 1854, when he took up his abode in Wayne County, Iowa, making his home there until the spring of 1862. At that date he crossed the great plains and located in Oregon, whence he came to Idaho in March, 1864, locating in the section that was then in Boise County but is now in Ada County. In 1887 he took up his residence about twelve miles west of Boise city, on the farm where his death occurred March 20, 1899. At the...

Biography of Shepard Keene Linscott

Shepard Keene Linscott. The late Shepard Keene Linscott, who was born March 6, 1887, and died December 11, 1905, represented in the best sense the highest type of American manhood. A farm near Chesterville, Maine, was the place of his nativity and he was the only son of Shepard and Esther (Keene) Linscott. The house in which he was born was built by his grandfather, Samuel Linscott, who was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. When but sixteen years of age, Shepard Keene Linscott left the parental roof and became a pioneer farmer of Henry County, Indiana. Realizing the importance of an education, he became a student at Hamilton College, Clinton, New York, and while there met, and on March 8, 1858, married Myra Simmons. That he might contribute his mite to the preservation of the Union, he became a member of the Ninth Illinois Cavalry and served in Alabama and Mississippi until after peace was declared. It is worthy of note that he was one of the few soldiers of the Civil war who never applied for a pension, although legally entitled to one. From Illinois Mr. Linscott moved to Washington County, Iowa, and there engaged in mercantile pursuits at Dayton, and later at Washington, and still later was identified with the lumber business at Seymour. His wife died in Iowa after bearing him two children: a boy that died when three years old, and Esther J., who is now the wife of Theodore Saxon, of Topeka, Kansas. On April 19, 1866, Mr. Linscott was married to Miss Josephine Mallett. In the spring of 1872 Mr. Linscott moved...

Biography of John R. Kellogg

JOHN R. KELLOGG. – No compilation that purports to give representation to the leading men of Union county would be complete were there failure to incorporate therein an epitome of the career of the venerable and esteemed gentleman whose name is at the head of this article and who has the distinction of being among the very first dauntless men who made permanent settlement in this favored section, and who is no less distinguished by his faithful labors in all the long years since that have resulted so well in the development and progress of Union county, as well as in the upbuilding of her institutions and the bettering of his fellows. On July 20, 1830, in a village in Oswego county, New York, there was born a son to Martin P. and Melvina (Potter) Kellogg, the subject of our humble sketch. The father was a faithful laborer in the ministry of the Methodist church and moved from place to place, taking our subject at an early age to Holmes county, Ohio, and also to various other sections of that classic commonwealth. At the noted Oberlin College of that state John R. was trained not only in the lore of books, but in the sound principles that have characterized him in his later life of worthy service. At the age of twenty-three he departed from his alma mater and took up the life of the educator, manifesting capabilities and perseverance at the inception that betokened the gratifying success that he gained later in this realm. He continued in various counties of Ohio, then removed to Fond du Lac, Wisconsin,...

Biography of James A. Russell

JAMES A. RUSSELL. – A well-known and esteemed member of the business world of Island City, where he operates a butchering establishment and also handles much stock, the subject of this article is deserving of representation in this volume, since he is not only now one of the prominent men of the county but has spent practically all of his life in this valley and has labored with zeal for the advancement of its interests. James A. was born on September 23, 1861, in Linesville, Iowa, being the son of Thomas J. and Savannah C. (Atha) Russell, who started the following spring to the western country, arriving in Lagrande in August of the same year. Mr. Russell was the first blacksmith in the valley, and he labored here for the building up of the country. Our subject was reared in the vicinity of Cove, receiving his education in the village schools there, studying until he was sixteen, and then commencing soon to teach, continuing for four terms in one district in High valley. At twenty years of age he took a course in Bishop Scott’s academy, and when he was twenty-three years of age he took charge of a surveying outfit in the mountains for five months. The next year he was engaged to handle Dr. Hill’s ranch of two hundred and forty acres, and continued in that capacity for three years, and then sold the ranch for the doctor and served as post-master at the Cove, in Cleveland’s administration, for one year. Later he contracted on railroad construction until 1892, then started a butcher shop in Cove, operating...

Makin, William – Obituary

To the capable and enterprising citizen whose name initiates this paragraph we are pleased to accord a representation in the history of Wallowa county, since he has trod the path of the pioneer in a worthy manner, displaying constantly qualities of moral worth and value, and has achieved a success in temporal affairs that is commendable and praiseworthy, being the meed of continuity in wisely directed effort and energy and sagacity in all of his ways, and consequently it is very fitting that he should be placed to-day as one of the prominent men of the county, which position he fills with acceptability. Mr. Makin was born in Erie County, Pennsylvania, on December 12, 1837, and went hence at the age of five to Marshall County, Indiana, with his parents, Robert and Margaret (Brewer) Makin. Soon after this journey, the father died and our subject was left with the mother, with whom he lived until he reached manhood’s estate. During this time he gained from the primitive schools of the place of education, walking to and from school three miles each way and searching for wisdom’s treasures around the old fashioned fireplace in a log schoolhouse. When our subject reached the age of eighteen, his mother was called to pass the river of death, and the following year he removed to Wayne county, Iowa whence after a short stay, he returned to Indiana. In 1857 he again made the trip to Iowa, remaining this time until 1862. In this last year, he prepared his family and holdings to take the long and arduous journey across the mountains and plains...

Hammack, James Lafayette – Obituary

Laid To Rest James Lafayette Hammack was born Oct. 18, 1860 in Wayne County, Iowa, and passed away at Lostine June 13, 1948. He crossed the plains with his parents in 1865, first to Yamhill County, and later to Summerville in Union County, where he lived until he was a young man. He then moved to Wallowa County where he had since made his home except from 1915 until 1928 when he lived in Hermiston, Oregon. He was united in marriage to Sarah A. Allen April 11, 1886. She passed away October 2, 1903. He was married on November 16, 1913, to Jessie May Robinson, who survives. He is also survived by an adopted daughter, Mrs. Laura Bales of Ellensburg, Wash.; five sisters, Mrs. Josie King of Ashland, Mrs. Emma Gastin of Wallowa, Mrs. Effie Cook, Mrs. Carrie Caudle and Mrs. Hattie Leonard all of Lostine; two stepsons, Dwight Purinton of Troy and Dan Robinson of Coulee City, Wash., and two step-daughters, Mrs. Gertie Thompson and Mrs. Bessie Wilson of Lostine, and many other relatives and friends. He united in 1930 with the Assembly of God church which he served faithfully. Funeral services were held in the Christian church Tuesday with Dick Johnston, pastor of the Wallowa Assembly of God church, in charge. Mr. and Mrs. M. Crow, Kate Page, Ella McArtor and Melvin Crow sang “When I’ve Gone the Last Mile of the Way,” “When They Ring Those Golden Bells” and “In the Sweet Bye and Bye,” accompanied by Frieda Smith at the piano. Pall bearers were Wm. Mullen, Chas. Page, Fred Asher, S. M. Crow, Walter Quesenberry...

Biography of General Marion Swanson

General Marion Swanson of Muskogee, well known in real estate circles through his purchase and sale of farm lands, is also engaged in farming, but follows this more as a recreation than as a source of livelihood. He was born in Lineville, Iowa, April 29, 1863, and is a son of William E. and Susan J. (Edgemand) Swanson. His father was always engaged in farming and stock raising and General Swanson, therefore, early became familiar with the various phases of agricultural life. He was educated in the public schools of Millersburg, Cherokee county, Kansas, and when not busy with his textbooks worked in the fields and assisted in the cultivation of the old homestead. In 1894 he removed to Oklahoma and for six years was engaged in farming in Lincoln County. While there residing he was elected for public office, being made deputy sheriff of the county, a position which he filled for two years. In August, 1902, Mr. Swanson came to Muskogee, then a part of the Indian Territory, and here he began dealing in agricultural leases, since which time he has concentrated his efforts and attention upon real estate. He now buys and sells property and places farm loans and has a large clientage. He also owns farm lands which he cultivates, finding pleasure in the development of the soil and the production of the crops. On the 29th of December, 1885, General Swanson was married to Miss Beulah K. Diamond, a native of Kentucky, and they have become the parents of six children: Ray D., Beulah Maude, Archie Glenn, William Earl, Lillian Ruth and Thomas Marion....
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