Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of R. W. Berry

A leading representative of the commercial interests of Hailey is R. W. Berry, the well known proprietor of a hardware store. He is an enterprising and progressive business man, whose well directed efforts, sound judgment and capable management insure him success, and today he is numbered among the substantial and valued citizens of Blaine county. A native of Maine, he was born in Augusta, on the 25th of March 1842 and is of Scotch lineage. His father, Arthur W. Berry, was born in Maine and married Miss Lucretia Jane Marble, also a native of the Pine Tree state. The father was for many years engaged in journalistic work as the publisher of the Gospel Banner. He died at the age of thirty-two years, leaving a widow and one son, the subject of this review. The mother lived to be fifty-seven years of age and died in Boise. After the death of Mr. Berry she married again and with her second husband removed to California, locating in Yuba County in 1857. In the public schools of his native state, R. W. Berry acquired his education, and when fifteen years of age began to earn his own living. He accompanied his mother to California. Attracted by the discovery of gold, he went to Washoe, Nevada, where he engaged in prospecting and mining. He also entered land from the government and followed farming for a time, but subsequently abandoned that occupation and returned to San Francisco, where he accepted a clerkship in the Washington market, where he was employed for four years. In the fall of 1864 he went to Portland, Oregon,...

Biography of Peter Goyette

PETER GOYETTE.- Energetic and enterprising, the subject of this sketch has passed a life of marked activity in the various places where he has migrated, having been in Union county for one-third of a century in which time he has been one of the most successful of its army of agriculturists and stockmen. Mr. Goyette is possessed of all the fervor of the Gallic nature with its vividness and practical powers of accomplishment, and although not native born, has like so many of that noted race, made a most commendable record for patriotism and stability in stanch support of the free institutions of his foster land. He was born to Antoine and Rose (Gouse) Goyette, natives of Canada, in East Canada, near Montreal, on April 5, 1841. There he received his education and remained on the farm with his parents until 1858, when his spirit of adventure led him to the “States.” He landed in Burlington, Vermont and went to work at brick-making, cutting wood in the winter, following this for two years, and then took a place in the cotton mills at Three Rivers, Massachusetts, at eleven dollars per month, his board costing eight of that. Three months of this service was sufficient for his restless spirit and on February 5, 1860, he, in company with his cousin and a friend, boarded the steamer Golden Gate and made the trip via Aspinwall to that beautiful bay, the Golden Gate, landing there on February 28, 1860, with but very few dollars in pocket. He could not speak a word of English, but soon had found a job in Oakland...

Biography of Van B. De Lashmutt

VAN B. DE LASHMUTT. – The present mayor of Portland exemplifies the versatility characteristic of the early pioneers. As journalist, merchant, real-estate dealer, capitalist, banker and miner, he has been able to bring to bear his large abilities with equal facility. He is a native of the Hawkeye state, having been born at Burlington in 1842, where he passed his early years on a farm, – the best of all places to develop muscle and nerve. He reached Oregon in 1852, and when a youth of fifteen entered the office of the Salem Statesman, having a latent ambition for journalism, and was treated with fatherly consideration by Asahel Bush, the editor. Upon the outbreak of the Civil war, he left his prospects at our capital, and, enlisting in the Third California Infantry, served his term with General Conner’s command in Utah. When mustered out in 1864, he again directed his attention to journalism, being publisher and editor of the Times at Washoe, Nevada. Even while in the army at Salt Lake he had been concerned in publishing the Vidette, the first daily in the Mormon capital. In 1865 he had reached Oregon once more, and found employment in the office of the Oregonian. Although displaying the qualities which constitute a journalist, he sought a freer and more remunerative field in the business world. with unusual sagacity he saved his earnings, and with a Mr. Hibbard, and later with H.B. Oatman, carried on a successful business. In 1870 he diverted his capital into a general real-estate and brokerage line. This was a time in the city’s history analogous to the...

Pin It on Pinterest