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Biography of Edwin R. Christman

Edwin R. Christman, secretary of the Silurian Oil Company of St. Louis, was born September 6, 1887, in Wheeling, West Virginia, a son of Edwin A. Christman, a native of Tennessee and a representative of one of the old Pennsylvania families of Dutch descent and also of early American Quaker ancestry living in Pennsylvania. Edwin Christman was united in marriage to Margaret Cahill, a native of Tennessee and of Irish lineage. They have become the parents of four children, two sons and two daughters. Edwin R. Christman, the second in order of birth, was educated in the public schools of Washington, Pennsylvania, and completed a high school course there. His first employment was in the tin plate business, as a representative of the McClure Company at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He was employed in a clerical capacity and when eighteen years of age began to earn his own livelihood, altogether continuing with the McClure Company for three years. He next became associated with the Silurian Oil Company at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, accepting the position of clerk in 1908, while in 1910 he was advanced to office manager and made secretary of the St. Louis office. This position he has since filled and the success of the enterprise in the middle Mississippi valley is attributable in large measure to his efforts, his enterprise, his thorough understanding of the business and his fidelity to the interests which he represents. He is also the secretary of the W. C. McBride Company, Inc., of St. Louis. In the Silurian Oil Company he is connected with J. R. McCune, who is the president and treasurer of the...

Biographical Sketch of Richard W. Blue

Richard W. Blue, a Union veteran of Virginia and a leading lawyer and judge of Kansas, finally advanced to the halis of Congress as a representative of his adopted state. He was born in Wood County, Virginia, September 8, 1841, and was raised on a mountain farm near the present city of Grafton. In 1859 he entered Monongalia Academy at Morgantown, Va., and remained at that institution several years, first as pupil and later as teacher, Subsequently he entered Washington College, Pennsylvania, and remained there until he enlisted in the Third West Virginia Infantry, at the opening of the Civil war. Mr. Blue was wounded in the Battle of Rocky Gap, in Southwestern Virginia, promoted to second lieutenant for gallantry in action, and within a short time was commissioned captain. In one of the engagements he was captured and held as a prisoner of war at Libby prison and also at Danville, Va. The regiment was mounted and after the Salem raid was changed, by order of the secretary of war, to the Sixth West Virginia Cavalry. Its final service was in a campaign on the plains against the Indians at the close of the war. The regiment was mustered out at Fort Leavenworth, so that Mr. Blue was in Kansas during the early ’60s. After his discharge from the army he returned to Virginia, taught school, read law and was admitted to the bar of that state in 1870. In 1871 he settled in Linn County, Kansas, but in 1898 he moved to Labette County, and finally located in Cherokee County. There he became a leading lawyer, serving...

Biographical Sketch of E. Loomis Spriggs

Spriggs, E. Loomis; realty and building; born, Washington, Pa., Oct. 17, 1880; son of Edward and Josephine E. Greenlee Spriggs; educated, Ohio Northern University, Ada, O.; treas. The Commonwealth Realty & Building Co.; identified with the agency force of The Pittsburgh Life & Trust Co.; subsequently in the Federal service at Pittsburgh until 1906, when he resigned, to become associated with his brother, C. H. Spriggs, as Cleveland real estate operators; this partnership became the basis for the formation of The Commonwealth Realty & Building Co.; member Lakewood Chamber of Commerce, and Lakewood Lodge, F. & A. M.; Progressive Republican in politics; his ancestors among the first settlers of the colonies of Connecticut and Pennsylvania, and prominent in the War of...

Biography of Samuel Brownlee Fisher

Samuel Brownlee Fisher of Parsons, consulting engineer of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad Company, is one of the eminent railway engineers of America. He had had nearly fifty years of active experience and had been identified with the construction of various railway lines in the West and East. He comes of an old Scotch family of Covenanter stock. On the maternal side his ancestors were the Brownlees, who were Covenanters in Scotland and were exiled because of their religious belief and settled in Pennsylvania. Mr. Fisher’s great-great-grandfather in the maternal line, George Wilie, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and another member of this same family was Colonel Thompson, an aide to General Washington. Mr. Fisher’s maternal grandfather, Samuel Brownlee, was born in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1792, and spent all his life on a farm in that rugged district of Southwestern Pennsylvania, dying in 1855. He was an active abolitionist in the days before the Civil war and was a member of the Associate Branch of the Presbyterian Church. Samuel Brownlee married Ann Wilie, who was born and died at Washington, Pennsylvania. The father of Mr. Fisher was Rev. Jacob P. Fisher, who was born in Ohio in 1808, but was reared and married in Washington, Pennsylvania. He was a minister of that branch of Presbyterianism formerly known as the Associate Church. He was also actively identified with the abolition cause. His death occurred in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1853. Rev. Mr. Fisher married Jane Thompson Brownlee, who was born in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1820. She died in 1888 while visiting in Montana, her home at that time...

Biography of Charles South

Charles South. The oil industry in the Mid-Continent field of Kansas had an able representative in the person of Charles South, of Chanute, who had been producing in this field since 1903. Like many of the men interested in the business here, Mr. South had his introduction to oil production in the Pennsylvania fields, and when he arrived in Kansas had a number of years of experience back of him to assist him in his enterprises. Mr. South was born near the City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, April 26, 1864, and is a son of John and Vilinda (Everly) South. He belongs to a family which traces its ancestry back to Cromwell’s time in England, when the family sided with King Charles, and which was founded in America during the days previous to the outbreak of the War of the American Revolution. Benjamin South, the great-grandfather of Charles South, was born in New Jersey, and went with his son Enoch to Greene County, Pennsylvania, where his death occurred. Enoch South, grandfather of Charles, was born in 1787, in New Jersey, subsequently became a pioneer of Western Pennsylvania, where he was an extensive land owner, and died in Greene County, that state, in 1863. The family had a fine Revolutionary record, the eight sons of the original emigrant (who was the great-great-great-grandfather of Charles South) having fought as soldiers of the Continental line, enlisting from the colony of New Jersey. John South was born in 1822, in Greene County, Pennsylvania. He was reared to manhood and educated in Greene County, and like his father became an extensive landholder, also building up...

Biography of Leonard Harrison Patterson

Leonard Harrison Patterson. Among the representative citizens of Wild Cat Township, Riley County, Leonard H. Patterson, whose hundreds of acres of valuable land stretch farther than the eye can reach, came first to Kansas in 1860. For many years his subsequent life was one of danger, adventure and hardship, and it was not until 1867 that he settled down to peaceful agricultural pursuits, at that time purchasing the land on which he has since resided. Leonard H. Patterson was born April 5, 1836, near Washington, Erie County, Pennsylvania. He was the eldest in a family of nine children born to William James and Eunice Samantha (Hardy) Patterson. They were natives of New York and were married in that state in 1835 and soon afterward removed to Erie, Pennsylvania. There they spent the rest of their lives, the mother dying in 1857 and the father in 1878. Reared on the home farm, on which he remained until he was twenty-one years of age, Leonard H. Patterson grew tired of his environment and as his father did not need his assistance any longer, he started then into the world to make his own way among strangers. For one year he worked as a farm hand in New York and then engaged in farming on his own account but not altogether to his satisfaction as in 1860 he came to Kansas in the hope of bettering his fortunes. He found a more or less disturbed country because of the political agitation of the time that greatly affected Kansas. In the following spring war was declared between the North and the South and...

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