Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of G. O. Hall, M. D.

The career of Dr. G. O. Hall, a leading physician of Bartlesville, is proof of the fact that it is only under adverse conditions that the best and strongest in the individual are developed, for he is a self-educated, self-made man whose indomitable purpose and untiring effort have enabled him to overcome all obstacles and difficulties in his path and work his way steadily forward to the goal of success. A native of Texas, he was born September 1, 1882, and is a son of Dr. P. B. Hall, who for the past twenty-one years has been engaged in the practice of medicine at Marlow, Oklahoma, being one of the well known physicians of that locality. G. O. Hall was regarded as a dull boy in school and owing to his retiring nature was not popular with his playmates, but by those who knew him well he was loved and trusted. His early life was one of hardship and privations and when twelve years of age he was run over by a wagon, the injury causing an infection which necessitated the use of crutches for five years, and he is still lame. The accident nearly cost him his life and he was obliged to remain out of school for three years but studied at home and made three grades during this time. His parents were in straitened circumstances and before completing his high school course he was obliged to aid in providing for his own support, working for a year for a telephone company. He went to Dallas, Texas, for the purpose of taking a commercial course and lack...

Biography of Howard Davis

Howard Davis, the owner of a well improved and productive farm near Bartlesville, also has valuable oil wells on his property, and in the conduct of his interests he displays keen discernment, marked executive ability and enterprise. He is a native of Indiana but was reared in Illinois and in 1901 he came to Indian Territory, settling in Lincoln county, where he engaged in buying broom corn for an eastern firm. Subsequently he removed to Osage county and there devoted his attention to the cattle business until he took up his residence in Washington county, where he has remained. Mr. and Mrs. Davis and family are now the owners of a valuable farm of two hundred and thirty acres, situated one and a half miles south of Bartlesville, upon which he has placed many improvements, and in the operation of the ranch he follows the most progressive methods, keeping thoroughly abreast of the times in all matters relating to agricultural development. There are also fifteen oil wells on the property, from which he and his family receive royalties, and this is one of the most desirable farms in northeastern Oklahoma. On the 22d of January, 1916, Mr. Davis was united in marriage to Mrs. Lucy (Wagoner) Sarcoxie, a daughter of Joseph Wagoner. Her mother passed away when Mrs. Davis was an infant. Her sister, Kate, is now in the employ of the Chamber of Commerce at Bartlesville. Her grandmother, Mrs. Paticow, is reputed to be one hundred and twenty-six years old. She was born in Texas and was seven years old at the time of the great meteoric disturbance,...

Biography of Mrs. Jane Buford

Among the honored pioneer women of Oklahoma is numbered Mrs. Jane Buford, who resides in a beautiful home at No. 102 North Cherokee street in Bartlesville. She is a member of the Delaware tribe of Indians and during her infancy was brought by her parents to Indian Territory at an early period in its settlement. She acquired a thorough knowledge of the English language, in which she converses as fluently as in her native tongue, and as a young woman she was united in marriage to Jacob Wheeler, now deceased. They became the parents of three children: Lena, the eldest in the family, was accorded liberal educational advantages, attending the University at Muskogee and Haskell Institute at Lawrence, Kansas. She is the widow of Dennis Parker and the mother of three children, Geneva Blanche, Edward Job and Leona Marie, all of whom are attending school. Edward Wheeler, the second in order of birth, acquired his education in the schools of Fort Worth, Texas, and Chilocco, Oklahoma, and is still at home. Bryant, who was educated at Lawrence, Kansas, is deceased. All of the family have their allotments of land and receive royalties in oil. Following the demise of her first husband Mrs. Wheeler married Mr. Buford, who has also passed away. Previous to establishing her home in Bartlesville she resided on a large farm within a few miles of the town. Practically her entire life has been passed in this state and she remembers the time when the Indians far outnumbered the white settlers and the land was wild and undeveloped, its rich resources being then undreamed of. She...

Biography of Robert I. Allen, M. D.

One of the best known surgeons in northeastern Oklahoma is Dr. Robert I. Allen, who was born at Coodys Bluff on the 9th of September, 1877, a son of Dr. R. M. and Mary (Journeycake) Allen. His father was a native of Illinois, in which state he resided until after the close of the Civil war. Upon the outbreak of that war he enlisted in the Federal army and became a member of the medical staff. He was a stretcher bearer at the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. Dr. R. M. Allen received his medical training at Rush Medical College of Chicago and was a graduate of that institution. He came to Nowata in 1868 and was the first practicing physician here. He was successfully identified with the profession until 1904, when his demise occurred in Nowata. In September, 1868, occurred the marriage of Dr. R. M. Allen to Mary Journeycake, whose uncle, Charlie Journeycake, was the noted chief of the Delaware. Mrs. Allen died January 16, 1922, and was buried beside her husband in Nowata county. In the acquirement of an education Robert I. Allen attended the Cherokee schools and later entered Bacone Indian University and Willie Halsell College at Vinita. Determining upon a medical career, he subsequently enrolled as a student in the Baines Medical College at St. Louis, Missouri, and graduating in 1899, began practice at Centralia, Craig county, this state. Later he removed to Dewey and in 1915 went to Nowata, where he resided until July, 1922, when he removed to Bristow, Oklahoma. He has built up an extensive and lucrative practice and...

Northeastern Oklahoma Biographies

The following biographies were written in 1922 and pertain to “important” men who resided in the Muskogee and northeastern areas of Oklahoma. By important, it should be emphasized that each biography was submitted along with a payment for inclusion in the biographical manuscript. Therefore, anyone who chose not to pay for such a service was often left out of the manuscript. The counties covered by this manuscript include Adair, Cherokee, Craig, Delaware, Mayes, McIntosh, Muskogee, Nowata, Ottawa, Rogers, Sequoyah, Wagoner, and Washington.

Biography of W. F. Maberry

In the final analysis farming is the basis of prosperity in America. It is the very beginning of the intricate operations which furnish man with food, and among those whose activity in the cultivation of the soil has promoted the development of northeastern Oklahoma, is numbered W. F. Maberry, who resides on a well improved farm in the vicinity of Bartlesville. A native of Missouri, he was born December 12, 1874, and in 1899, when twenty-five years of age, he came to Oklahoma, first locating on Marmon creek, in Nowata county. For two years he engaged in farming in that -locality and then went to Dewey, Washington county, devoting his attention to the operation of fifteen hundred and seventy-five acres of land, situated north of the town, the tract being owned by himself and brother, I. J. Maberry, now deceased. For four years they were thus occupied, at the end of which period the subject of this review purchased a seventy-acre farm eight miles east of Bartlesville, which he has since made his home, and he also has a ranch of two hundred and ten acres on Hogshooter creek and a tract of one hundred acres on Bird creek, situated one and a half miles from Owasso, in Tulsa county, which he leases. He has a fine country home on the Bartlesville-Nowata road and has added many improvements to his place, erecting substantial barns and other necessary outbuildings for the shelter of grain and stock and utilizing the best farm machinery on the market. Working diligently as the years have passed, he has succeeded in bringing his land to...

Biography of L. P. Carpenter

L. P. Carpenter, who has been a resident of northeastern Oklahoma for a third of a century, was actively identified with agricultural interests here until he put aside the work of the fields in 1919 and has since lived retired in an attractive home at Bartlesville. His birth occurred in Clay County, Indiana, on the 11th of November, 1867, his parents being Adam and Anna (Reamy) Carpenter, who were natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio, respectively. Both are deceased. He acquired his education in his native state and on attaining his majority left the parental roof to come to Oklahoma, settling in Osage county, ten miles northwest of Bartlesville. There he devoted his attention to farming and stock raising for many years with excellent success, for he was industrious, energetic and progressive in all of his undertakings. In 1919, having acquired a comfortable competence, he took up his abode in Bartlesville, where he has since lived retired in the enjoyment of well earned ease. In early manhood Mr. Carpenter was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary E. Roy, who was born on the Osage Reservation, about ten miles northwest of Bartlesville, on the 27th of October, 1871, and is a representative of one of the most prominent families of the Osage Nation. Her father, a native of Canada, died before her birth. Her mother; who was Mrs. Rosalie (Prudom) Roy, is still living and is now the wife of H. N. Hampton of Bartlesville. Mr. Carpenter has received royalties from the oil holdings of his wife. To Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter were born four children: Floyd H:, who is twenty-nine...

Biography of George B. Keeler

There is no man who has taken more active and helpful part in the development of Bartlesville and Washington county than George B. Keeler. He has resided in this section of the state from early pioneer times and was adopted into the Cherokee tribe in 1872. He understands the sign language of all of the Indian tribes and speaks the Osage tongue. He has been in a way a connecting link between the Indian life and customs of an early day and the modern civilization and progress. His business activity has covered a wide scope, leading directly to the improvement, settlement and up building of this section of the country, where he has lived from pioneer times, Nelson F. Carr being the only white man who has resided in this part of the state for a longer period. Mr. Keeler came to the southwest from Illinois, his birth having occurred at Hennepin, Putnam county, February 7, 1850. His father, Alson Keeler, was a native of Kyler, Courtland county, New York, and in an early day removed to Illinois, where he resided until 1856. He had followed merchandising in the quaint old town of Hennepin. on the Illinois river, but when his son, George, was a lad of six years he removed with his family to Vernon county, Wisconsin, where he remained for about a decade, devoting three or four years of that period to farming. He afterward returned to Illinois, settling in Belvidere and in 1868 he removed to Iowa, establishing a store in Boone and thus following merchandising as he had done in Belvidere. In 1870 he removed...

Biography of J. C. Sheets

One of the events which has had much to do with turning the tide of progress and shaping the course of development in Washington county was the discovery of oil, and prominently known among the oil producers of the state is J. C. Sheets, now living at Copan. Opportunity has ever been to him a call to action-a call to which he has made ready and immediate response. The chances that have come to him he has eagerly utilized, for his sound judgment enables him readily to understand the real value of such chances. His labors have been an element in the progress and growth of Washington county, as well as in the up building of his own fortunes and today he is most widely known and highly esteemed in this part of the state. J. C. Sheets is a native of West Virginia, his birth having occurred at Salmon, on the 19th of November, 1876, his parents being Leander and Alice Starr (Curtis) Sheets. The father was born in New Matamoras, Washington county, Ohio,. March 18, 1838, and in young manhood removed to West Virginia, where he devoted his life to farming interests until he retired from active business. His last years were spent in Oklahoma, his death occurring at Copan in September, 1908. His wife was born in Hockingport, Athens county, Ohio, November 24, 1849, and was a little maiden of ten summers when in 1860 she accompanied her parents on their removal to West Virginia, there remaining until she went with her husband to Oklahoma, where she still resides. They were the parents of four, children:...

Biography of Dutch White Turkey

Dutch White Turkey, long identified with the farming interests of Washington county and in more recent years connected with the oil development of this part of the state, was born on the 18th of June, 1857, in Kansas, seven miles east of Lawrence on the Delaware reservation. He was the eldest in a family of eight children, the others being: Sam; Robert; Albert; George; Katie, who became the wife of James Day of Bartlesville; Lilly, the wife of Dolph Fugate of Dewey; and Lucinda, deceased. Both of the parents were full-blooded Delawares and their name was really Simon. White Turkey is the name that was given to the ancestors by the Delaware tribe and it was adopted by them and they are so registered by the United States government. It was in the spring of 1868 that the parents came to the Indian Territory. In their train were about two hundred wagons and they were led by Chief Charley, who was then quite an old man but who knew all of the trails, having been a hunter and trapper in an early day. The party first located on the forks of the Little and Big Caney rivers in the vicinity of what is now the city of Dewey. From there the parents removed to Hogshooter creek and afterward to a place near the present site of Bartlesville. Dutch White Turkey was a lad of but thirteen years at the time of his father’s death. His early home in this section of the state was a little log cabin, which was surrounded with a brush fence. His mother died about...
Page 2 of 1512345678910...Last »

Pin It on Pinterest