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Biography of Robert V. Cozier

On the roll of Idaho’s statesmen and eminent representatives of the bar is found the name of Hon. Robert V. Cozier, who has left the impress of his individuality upon the legislation and public progress. He is a man of strong mentality, of marked patriotism and broad humanitarian principles, and is therefore well fitted for leadership in the public movements which affect the welfare of the commonwealth. He is now acceptably filling the position of United States attorney for Idaho, and his comprehensive knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence and his ability in handling intricate legal problems make him a most competent official. Robert V. Cozier is a native of Ohio, his birth having occurred in the town of Wapakoneta, October 20, 1867. He is of German and Irish lineage, but for several generations the family has been represented in America. His father, Rev. B. F. W. Cozier, was born in Pennsylvania in 1836, on what is now the battlefield of Gettysburg, and is a prominent minister in the Methodist Episcopal church, having devoted his entire life to preaching the gospel of peace and righteousness among men. In 1870 he removed to Iowa, where the greater part of his ministerial labor has been performed. For years he was a presiding elder, connected with different conferences in that state. During the entire civil war he served his country as chaplain of the Third Ohio Cavalry, and his voice and talent were used on the side of the Union and for “liberty throughout the land and to all the inhabitants thereof.” He carried comfort to many a soldier upon the tented...

Biography of Arthur Devore

Arthur Devore is one of the able merchants of Southern Kansas. For a quarter of a century he has been manager of the Ulmer Furniture Company at Independence, one of the largest furniture and general household supply houses in the state. While his exceptional ability has gone into the making of this large establishment, he has not withheld his influence and work from any local affairs of importance, and is regarded as one of Independence’s most progressive and public spirited men. He has spent most of his life in Kansas, but was born at Wapakoneta, Ohio, April 23, 1862. His ancestors were French people, Huguenots, and during the persecution of that sect were expelled from France and settled in Maryland. His Grandfather Arthur DeVore was born in Pennsylvania, and went to Ohio as a pioneer, living on a farm in that state until his death. B. F. DeVore, father of the Independence merchant, was born in Pennsylvania in 1828. He was a pioneer of Independence, Kansas, having moved to that frontier town in 1870. He was reared in Pennsylvania, studied law at Cincinnati, was admitted to the bar, and was married at Wapakoneta, Ohio, where he practiced for a number of years. Later he moved to Hartford City, Indiana, and after coming to Independence was engaged in the mercantile business and later as a democrat was appointed postmaster, serving during Cleveland’s administration. He was one of the most popular men in this section of the state. Evidence of this is found in the fact that at one time he was elected a member of the Legislature. His rival for...

Shawnee Indian Chiefs and Leaders

Big Jim Big Jim. The popular name of a noted full-blood Shawnee leader, known among his people as Wapameepto, “Gives light as he walks”. His English name was originally Dick Jim, corrupted into Big Jim. He was born on the Sabine Reservation, Texas, in 1834, and in 1872 became chief of the Kispicotha band, commonly known as Big Jim’s band of Absentee Shawnee. Big Jim was of illustrious lineage, his grandfather being Tecumseh and his father one of the signers of the “Sam Houston treaty” between the Cherokee and affiliated tribes and the Republic of Texas, February 23, 1836. He was probably the most conservative member of his tribe. In the full aboriginal belief that the earth was his mother and that she must not be wounded by tilling of the soil, he refused until the last to receive the allotments of land that had been forced upon his band in Oklahoma, and used every means to overcome the encroachments of civilization. For the purpose of finding a place where his people would be free from molestation, he went to Mexico in 1900, and while there was stricken with smallpox in August, and died. He was succeeded by his only son, Tonomo, who is now (1905) about 30 years of age. Chief Black Bob Black Bob. The chief of a Shawnee band, originally a part of the Hatha­wekela division of the Shawnee. About the year 1826 they separated from their kindred, then living in eastern Missouri on land granted to them about 1793 by Baron Carondelet, near Cape Girardeau, then in Spanish territory, and removed to Kansas, where, by treaty...

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