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Loney, Evelyn L. Paul – Obituary

Age 60 years. Home was in Greenacres. Lived there six years. Survived by two sisters, Mrs. Ida Thompson of Spokane and Mrs. Dr. Ridgeway of Olympia; two half sisters, Mr. J. A. Howard of Garfield and Mrs. Louisa Estes of Vancouver, B. C. Funeral Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. from Hazen & Jaeger’s Chapel, the Rev. Dr. S. J. Chaney officiating. The body will be sent to Walla Walla for interment. Spokane Review, February 26, 1930 Contributed by: Shelli...

Lee, Roy Thomas – Obituary

His home, S4202 Grand Blvd. Husband of Mrs. Myrtle L. Lee at the home; father of Mrs. Gladys McCarthy, Spokane; brother of Mrs. Charlotte Wilkinson, Okanogan, Wash.; Mrs. Carl Penner, Mrs. Guy Kent, Ted Lee, all of Walla Walla, Wash.; Henry Lee, Pendleton, Ore.; numerous nieces and nephews. A member of the Church of Christ Scientist; the Elks Lodge of Walla Walla, Wash., The Brotherhood of Railway Train men. A resident of Spokane 27 years. Mr. Lee will be sent by the Hazen & Jaeger Funeral Home, N1306 Monroe St. to the Groseclose Mortuary, Walla Walla, Wn., where services will be held Thurs., Oct. 5 at 2 p.m. burial services at Mountain View Cemetery, Walla Walla. Contributed by: Shelli...

Whitson, Edward N. – Obituary

Edward N. Whitson, judge of the United States Circuit Court of the Eastern District of Washington, died at his home in this city Saturday night, following an attack of paralysis last Wednesday morning. Judge Whitson was born in Salem, Ore., October 6, 1852. His education was received in the public and high schools of that day and in Oregon College. In 1879 he was admitted to the bar. September 3, 1885, he was married to Leora Nellie Bateman at Walla Walla. He lived a large part of his life in the Yakima Valley and was prominently identified with the commercial growth and political life of that section. In 1875-76 he was auditor of Yakima County and was Mayor of North Yakima from 1886 to 1888. He was a member of the territorial legislature in 1877-78. He assumed the duties of district judge March 14, 1905, at the time of the division to this state into districts. Contributed by: Shelli...

Lee, Robert E. – Obituary

Robert E. Lee, 69, range keeper for the state game department at the Kettle Falls game farm died suddenly from a heart attack while attending an auction sale in Colville Saturday [May 1, 1954]. He was born May 17, 1884 at Walla Walla and resided at Kettle Falls the past five years. Survivors include his wife Hattie at the home; one daughter Mrs. Rex Jones [Roberta] of Dayton, Wash., a son Robert Lee Jr., of Milton-Freewater, Ore.; three sisters, Mrs. Jos. Wilkenson [Charlotte] of Omak and Mrs. Carl Penner [Edith] and Mrs. Guy Kent [Margaret] of Walla Walla; three brothers, Roy T. Lee of Spokane, John H. Lee of Pendleton, Ore., and Theodore R. Lee of Walla Walla, and two grandchildren. The body was taken to Walla Walla by the Moser & Egger funeral home for final services. Interment was in the Blue Mountain Cemetery, Walla Walla. Contributed by: Shelli...

Bryson, Elmer D. – Obituary

Elmer D. Bryson, 605 Boyer, died Saturday afternoon at a local nursing home. H was 59 years old and was a resident of this region for 40 years. Bryson was a woolgrower and for 25 years, secretary of the Wenaha Wood Growers association. He graduated from the Weston normal school and the Portland Business college. He had been in the wool business 31 years and was born December 1, 1881 near Weston. Surviving him are his wife, Charlotte; a daughter and son Blanche and Howard, both of Walla Walla, and two sisters, Mrs. Daisy Scott of Enterprise, Ore. And Mrs. Bessie Davis of Redmond, Ore. Bryson was a member of the Mason, Shriners, Elks and the Odd Fellows. –Walla Walla Union-Bulletin (WA), Sunday, 8 June 1941, front...

Bryson, Howard – Obituary

Native Walla Wallan Howard Roscoe Bryson, 76, died July 18, 1989, at the Seattle Veterans Administration Medical Center. The funeral service was held today at Washington Soldiers’ Home Chapel in Orting, Wash., and the memorial service was at Sumner (Wash.) Presbyterian Church. Burial was at Veterans of all Wars Court in Mountain View Cemetery, Tacoma. Memorial contributions may be made to the Sumner Presbyterian Church through hill Funeral Home, 217 E. Pioneer Ave., Puyallup, Wash. 98372. Bryson was born July 21, 1912, in Walla Walla. He was a direct descendant of William I. Price of Orange. Bryson’s ancestors settled at New Amsterdam, N.Y. from the Netherlands and later in Iowa. Some came West in a covered wagon and settled in Cove, Ore. He attended elementary school in Walla Walla. While at Walla Walla High School, he participated in numerous activities and won a tennis championship. He graduated from high school at 15 with an IQ of 150. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in economics in 1933 from Whitman College when he was 19. While at Whitman, he was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity, French club, the sophomore play staff, was a advertising manager of The Pioneer, in pep band, manager of the operetta “Pirates of Penzance,” and a member of the Drama Club, participating in “Blue Moon.” He taught commercial and business subjects in the Clarkston High School and later at Washtuncna High School. He also managed his father’s sheep ranch for about five years when his father was in ill health. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Bryson enlisted in the U.S. Army in January...

Bryson, Blanche – Obituary

Blanche H. Bryson, 85, of 605 Boyer Ave. died Oct. 9, 1995, at the Washington Odd Fellows Home. Those who wish may meet at Mountain View Cemetery, 2120 S. Second Ave., for the 2 p.m. graveside service Thursday. The Rev. Pat Robbennolt of the First Congregational Church will officiate. Memorial contributions may be made to a charity of the donor’s choice through Herring Funeral Home, 315 W. Alder St. Miss Bryson was born March 26, 1910 in Walla Walla to Elmer D. and Charlotte Doane (sic-not her name) Bryson. She attended schools in Walla Walla and graduated from Walla Walla High School and Whitman College. A lifetime Walla Walla resident, she taught school in the Touchet-Gardenia area for a time. She was in the sheep business and worked in the family business and helped set up camp for sheepherders. She devoted her entire life to helping her parents in this venture. Miss Bryson was a member of First Congregational Church, Daughters of the Pioneers, Daughters of the Nile, Order of the Eastern Star, Rebekah Lodge Narcissa No. 2, Colonial Dames, Huguenot Society and the Whitman College Alumni Association. Surviving are a sister-in-law, Vivian Bryson of Tacoma; and two nieces, Barbara Bishop of Pullman and Katherine Holden of Woodinville, Wash. Her brother, Howard Bryson, preceded her in death. –Walla Walla Union-Bulletin (WA), Tuesday, 10 October 1995, pg....

Biographical Sketch of Otis Patterson

OTIS PATTERSON. – Mr. Patterson, editor of the Heppner Gazette, at Heppner, Oregon, and one of the representative men of common sense and energy in the Inland Empire, was born at Danville, Indiana, September 4, 1858. He remained in that city until the age of eighteen, receiving a good common-school education. He also improved himself by a scientific course, graduating as B.S. from the Centeral Normal College of Danville. In 1876 he acted upon the advice of a celebrated father of his profession, and came to Emporia, Kansas, where he engaged in educational work. In 1882 he performed the rest of the journey across the continent, stopping in California. Remaining there only a short time, however, he came by way of Portland, Oregon to Walla Walla, where he once more became a teacher of schools, following that occupation in various schools in Walla Walla county until 1885. In that year he became principal of the Heppner Public School, and conducted that institution with great success. The following spring he entered into business, successfully establishing a store in the hardware line. Seeing the opportunity and feeling the desire to occupy a somewhat more advanced position as educator, not simply of children but of men and of the people at large, he purchased in 1888 the Heppner Gazette and has conducted that periodical to the present time with very marked success, now owning one of the best-appointed newspaper offices in Eastern Oregon, and every week issuing a clean, honest and able paper, of which the county is justly proud. In 1884, he was married to Miss Mary Gregg of Walla Walla,...

Biography of William C. Painter

WILLIAM C. PAINTER. – William C. Painter was born in St. Genevieve county, Missouri, April 18, 1830. His parents, Philip and Jean, lived on a farm; and the early years of William’s life were passed in that home. In 1850 his father started for Oregon with his family of wife and seven children, but died of cholera on the Little blue river. Two of his sons had been buried as they camped by that stream two days before; and only the mother, with her two daughters, Margaret A. and Sara J., and three sons, William C., Joseph C. and Robert M. were left to continue their sorrowful journey to the Pacific coast. Upon the family’s arrival in the Willamette valley, they took up several Donation claims in Washington county; and the one taken by William was retained by him until his removal to Washington Territory in 1862. When the Indian war of 1855 broke out, he was one of those who enlisted for that campaign as a member of Company D, First Regiment, Oregon Mounted Volunteers, continuing to follow the fortunes of his company until it was mustered out of service late in 1856. It was the opportune arrival of this command upon the scene of action that caused the Indians at the battle of Walla Walla, in December, 1855, to give up the struggle and retreat into the Palouse country. He participated with credit to himself in all the battles and skirmishes of that war east of the Cascades, prior to the disbandment of his company. Mr. Painter was chosen by his comrades as the bearer of a...

Biography of Mrs. Hannah J. Olmstead

MRS. HANNAH J. OLMSTEAD. – Life upon the Pacific coast brings out the heroic qualities in women as well as in men. It is a social and conventional form which keeps them in the shadow of their husbands’ names. But everybody knows that the greater part of the incentive which a man has to win a position or a fortune comes from his wife. It has long been remarked that the women in the immigrant trains showed more pluck than the men; and many a dispirited husband was cheered up and almost carried through by his brave better half. Delicate women, not used to severe work, would wield the axe or the ox-whip when it fell from stronger hands, and in case of the loss of their companions could take care of their children. Mrs. Olmstead is one of these women, – a lady who can run a farm, transact her own business, and provide for and educate her children. She lives at Walla Walla, Washington, and owns her home. She is a native of South Salem, New York, was born in 1835, and is the daughter of Lewis and Eliza Keeler, well-to-do farmers, who, by the way, are still living, and are now eighty-one and seventy-six years old, respectively. In 1851 Miss Hannah was married to Daniel H. Olmstead, of Port Huron. Soon after their nuptials he was led to the Pacific coast by the California gold excitement. Like the most of the gold-hunters, Mr. Olmstead expected to make his fortune in a few months, – in a year at the longest, – and then go home to...
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