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Biography of William A. Kelsoe

William Austin Kelsoe was born in Greenville, Bond county, Illinois, February 1, 1851. Upon the death of his mother, a few weeks later, he was committed to the care of Mrs. Sarah Phelps, of Pocahontas, in the same county, and her daughters, one of whom is now Mrs. Kate L. Doubt, a resident of St. Louis. From the age of two years until he reached manhood he was a member of the family of William and Martha Greenwood Watkins and lived with them in Pocahontas, Greenville, Vandalia and East St. Louis, Illinois, also for three years on a farm a few miles northeast of Highland, Illinois. His father, Alexander Kelsoe, circuit clerk of Bond county for twelve years, died in January, 1862, and Mr. Watkins, who was his mother’s brother, was appointed his guardian. He attended the public schools of three of the towns named and also the Greenville Institute, a private school for boys conducted by Rev. Samuel W. Marston, father of Edgar L. Marston, a St. Louis attorney in the ’80s and now a prominent New York banker. Mr. Kelsoe entered McKendree College, Lebanon, Illinois, in the fall of 1866 and during the winter of 1870-1 he taught a country school in St. Clair county, Illinois. In 1872 he received the degree of A. B. from McKendree and three years later that of A. M., the intervening time being spent, for the most part, at the University of Heidelberg, Germany, which he entered in 1872 with one of his McKendree classmates, Dr. A. C. Bernays, later internationally famous as a surgeon, and Robert Luedeking, later dean of...

Biography of Henry D. Blatchley

Henry D. Blatchley came to Caldwell when it contained but one building, and has therefore witnessed its entire growth and development. In the work of progress and advancement he has ever borne his part and today is numbered among the pioneers and leading business men to whom the city is indebted for its upbuilding. A spirit of enterprise, so characteristic of the west, is noticeable in all that he does and has been manifest in his connection with Caldwell. He has ever merited the confidence and regard of his fellow men, which he receives in an unlimited degree, and in this volume well deserves mention among the representative merchants of Idaho. Mr. Blatchley is a native of Idaho, his birth having occurred in Blanchester, March 2, 1854. He is of Welsh lineage and his ancestors were among the early settlers of Pennsylvania and Ohio. One of the number, David Blatchley, was an officer in the Colonial army in the war of the Revolution; and the Comstock family, from which our subject is descended on the maternal side, was also represented in the struggle for American independence. They settled in Ohio, and one of the towns in the Buckeye state now bears the name of Comstock, it having been founded by relatives of our subject. His father, Daniel W. Blatchley, was born in Pennsylvania and was married there to Sylvia Ann Comstock, of Scranton, that state, a daughter of Zebulon Comstock, a prominent landowner of Scranton, and a representative of an old Virginian family. At a later date Mr. Blatchley removed with his family to Ohio, where for many years...

King, John – Obituary

Elgin, Union County, Oregon A Direct Descendant of the Pilgrim Fathers, and an Honered Pioneer of Eastern Oregon At the home of his daughter, Mrs. E.L. Harris, in Elgin. December 12, 1904. John King, aged 84 years, 9 months, 10 days. The deceased was among the well known citizens of Union and Wallowa counties, in which territory he had made his home since 1882. A son of Jacob King, one of Ohio’s pioneer settlers, he was able to trace his lineage directly to the Pilgrim Fathers, whose landing at Plymouth Rock in 1820 (Says 1820) marked one of the events which were to have distinctive quality in the history of our land. He was the third born in a family of eight children and was born near Zanesville, in Perry County, Ohio, March 2, 1820 of which family only three are now living. In 1849, on July 4th, he was united in marriage to Miss Maria A. Dawson, and to this union was born eight children, four of whom are now living. In early manhood he hewed out his home in the timbered regions on the south bank of the Maumee river, thirty miles from Teledo, Ohio, and here it was that his own family was born and reared. here, too, at his early home, he was wont to receive visits from many of Ohio’s great pioneers, among whom were general James Steelman and General Mead, whose records as Ohio pioneers are part of the state’s history. At his boyhood home, the tavern built by Jacob King beside the old stage road near Fremont, Ohio, he attended school at...

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