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Biography of Gay Hayden

MR. AND MRS. GAY HAYDEN. – Prominent among the many pioneers of the Pacific Northwest who deserve an enduring place in its history are Mr. and Mrs. Hayden of Vancouver, Washington, whose heroism under the many difficulties that beset the emigrants who broke the way for advancing civilization on this far frontier will seem to generations yet unborn, who are destined to read these pages, more like the dream of the novelist than a recital of fact. Mrs. Mary J. Hayden, who at this writing is a handsome, well-preserved and charmingly vivacious woman, as ready-witted, graceful and gentle as though border life had never been her portion, was born in the year 1830 in Athens, Maine, and spent her early childhood with her grandparents in the town of Cornville in that state. At the age of fifteen Miss Bean emigrated with her parents to the wilds of Wisconsin, where she was married in 1847 to Gay Hayden, one of the well-known pioneers of the Pacific Northwest, with whom her lot was cast; and, in the year 1850, they emigrated to that part of Oregon Territory to be known in future as the State of Washington. In recounting her experiences in crossing the plains with teams of oxen, Mrs. Hayden says; “We traveled leisurely at first, but wearily, as the roads were bad in early spring, and accommodation for ourselves and teams could be had at night in the spare settlements, through which we thought it safer not to hurry. But, when we launched out in the open prairie beyond the settlements, we enjoyed a sense of freedom and exhilaration...

Biography of George E. Wells

GEORGE E. WELLS. – The subject of this sketch is a man of great energy and power of adaptability, as is manifested in the occupations that have been engaged in by him during the years in which he has been in this western country, and it is pleasant to remark that during all of these varied undertakings, some of which have been exceedingly arduous and fraught with hardship and danger, he has manifested a stanch and unflinching courage, marked industry and enterprise, with excellent personal qualities of integrity and upright principles, while a good success has attended his efforts, both became of the excellent practical judgment used and because of his keen foresight and untiring efforts to do well whatever his hand undertook. George E. was born in Licking county, Ohio, on November 3, 1850, being the son of John and Sarah (Holmes) Wells. The father came to Oregon in 1859, settling at Oregon City and following the milling business for two years, when he repaired to Vancouver, Washington. The mother and three children then came and they all remained in that place until June, 1865, then they went to Lagrande, landing there on June 1, of that year. The father engaged in packing from Umatilla Landing to the mines of Boise Basin and others in this section. Our subject remained with his father one year in packing and then procured teams and continued the transportation of freight to the various points named until 1871. At that date the father quit teaming and went to dealing in wood in Lagrande and in that business he continued until the time...

Biographical Sketch of Matthias Spurgeon

MATTHIAS SPURGEON. – This pioneer of Clarke County is a native of Iowa, having been born in Cedar County in 1838. In his childhood he was bereft of his parents, and found a home in the family of an uncle, Mr. George Spurgeon. With this relative he came to Oregon while but a boy of fourteen, and found a home in the household of Mr. William H. Dillon. Soon after becoming of age, he spent two years in the mountains and gorges of Idaho prospecting for gold, meeting, however, with but little success. Returning to Clarke county he took up the business of farming, renting the well-known Petrain place near Vancouver, Washington. He was so successful, that in three years he made a portion of this farm his own by purchase, and it is still his home, stock-raising, farming and dairying occupying his attention. He was married in 1877 to Miss Olive Dillon, who was born in Oregon in 1856. They have four children, – Ella A., Mary J., John M. and Matthias J. This is one of the prosperous and well-ordered families of the...

Biography of Dr. Alden H. Steele

DR. ALDEN H. STEELE. – “Olympia will always be a place for pleasant homes,” says one of her citizens well qualified to render an opinion, – the gentleman whose name appears above. The wide streets, magnificent shade-trees and comfortable residences of the capital of Washington Territory, together with her delightful climate, an extensive view of water and mountains, fully justify the remark; and no place could have a more pleasant recommendation. The Doctor has also examined the facilities of the place for a naval station, and finds that the location is most desirable from the following particulars: Safe anchorage and good harbor; ease of defense; abundance of coal, iron and ship timber; opportunity for a fresh-water dock and basin at small cost at Priest’s Point; ease of communication; and advantage of tide. Doctor Steele, whose presence as a resident contributes much towards the pleasantness of Olympia, is a native of New York State, having been born in 1823 at Oswego, where his father had long been a successful merchant. At the age of twenty our subject graduated from the medical department of the University of New York, and also from the office of Doctor James R. Woods, the distinguished professor of surgery. The first practice of the young physician was at Oswego, new York; but in 1849, in company with the mounted riflemen under Lieutenant-Colonel Loring, he crossed the plains to Oregon and stopped at Vancouver, where he practiced his profession four years. In 1854 he was united in marriage to Miss Hannah H. Blackler, of Marblehead, Massachusetts. Her grandfather was a captain in the war of the Revolution,...

Biography of John Wagener

John Wagener is one of the owners of the Trook and Jennings mine and five-stamp mill, one mile southeast of Silver City. He is also proprietor of several stock ranches and since pioneer days has been active in the development of the business resources of this state. A native of Germany, he came to America hoping to better his financial condition, and whatever success he has achieved is due entirely to his own labors. Mr. Wagener was born June 30, 1833 and in his native land acquired his education. When a young man of nineteen years he bade adieu to home and friends and in 1852 sailed for America, coming to this country in limited circumstances and without any knowledge of the language, manners or customs of the people. It is astonishing how rapidly our foreign-born citizens adapt themselves to new surroundings and be-come an integral part in our public life. Mr. Wagener took up his residence in New York City and began learning the wagon maker’s trade, at which he worked for a number of years. He then left the Atlantic for the Pacific coast, and in 1858 visited Idaho, when it was still a part of Washington Territory. He crossed the plains to Vancouver’s, thence came to Florence in 1862, and after engaging in placer-mining at the latter place for a year, went to Idaho City in the Boise basin, where he worked at placer-mining, receiving three dollars per day and his board in compensation for his services. In January 1864, he arrived in Boonville, now called Dewey, and engaged in sawing lumber for the different stamp...

Biography of Thomas T. Redsull

Great, indeed, have been the changes that time and man have wrought since Thomas T. Redsull landed on the Pacific coast. California yet belonged to Mexico, and much of the land, especially in the southern part of the state, was divided into large estates, owned and occupied by Spanish families. Mr. Redsull was then but eleven years of age, yet had started out to make his own way in the world. He was born in the County of Kent, England, on the 15th of November, 1827, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Goymer) Redsull, both of whom were natives of England and representatives of ancient families of that country. They were both members of the Episcopal Church, and the father was a collector of excise for the government. He departed this life in 1858, at the age of fifty years, and his widow is now living at the age of one hundred and three years. They had seven children, but only three are now living. Mr. Redsull of this review acquired his early education in England, and when only eleven years of age was bound out as an apprentice to the Hudson’s Bay Company, and in their service came to the United States in 1838, landing in California. He is consequently one of the oldest pioneers of that state. The same year he also went to Oregon, and therefore can claim the honor of being a pioneer of that state, too. He made his home at Vancouver and was for twenty years a pilot on the Columbia River at Multnomah. On Multnomah island, May 4, 1854, Mr. Redsull was...

Biography of Auren G. Redway

For thirty-six years Auren G. Redway has been a resident of Boise, and for many years was prominently connected with her banking interests, but is now living retired, enjoying that well earned rest which is the fitting reward of an honorable and active business career. He comes from the far-off east and is a representative of a family that was established in America in colonial days. His grandfather, Preserved Redway, served his country throughout the war of the Revolution, was one of General Washington’s bodyguard, and had the honor of being a corporal of the guard at the time of the surrender of General Burgoyne. He lost one of his limbs in that great struggle for independence, but it was a willing sacrifice for the great cause of American liberty. By occupation he was a farmer, making that pursuit his life work. In religious belief he was a Presbyterian, and his death occurred April 28, 1837, when he had attained an advanced age. His wife, Azuba Redway, survived him a number of years, and passed away January i, 1853. Their son, Abel Redway, father of our subject, was born in Adams, Jefferson County. New York, February 8, 1805, and married Sally Charlotte Grinnell, a representative of the prominent Grinnell family of the Empire state. She was born at Galway on the 19th of May, 1810, and at the time of her marriage went to her husband’s home, on one of the farms of Jefferson County. They were also members of the Presbyterian Church, and by their union were born six children, four of whom are still living. Auren G....

Biography of John Krall

Few lives have been more active or more thoroughly filled with incidents of interest and of unusual nature than has that of John Krall, one of the pioneers of Idaho, and for about thirty-five years a resident in the vicinity of Boise City. Now a wealthy man, he is indebted to himself alone for his fortune, for he started out in youth to fight the battle of life, a poor boy, and by the exercise of industry and perseverance, in the face of great difficulties, he came off victor over all. Mr. Krall is a native of Germany, born December 10, 1835, his parents and ancestors likewise being of German birth. His father owned a flouring mill and the lad early learned the business. When he had mastered the branches of learning taught in the government schools he went to England, and there, at sixteen, took up the study of the English language and customs, while he worked as a baker and confectioner. Desiring to see something of the world, and well equipped to earn a living, as he was familiar with two languages and had mastered two trades, he shipped aboard a vessel and in the next few years sailed to various parts of the world. Once, when sailing around Cape Horn, he was shipwrecked, and the disabled vessel was towed to Valparaiso by an English man-of-war. From that city Mr. Krall went to Honolulu, and thence to San Francisco, where he remained until 1856. He then went to Oregon and Washington, and rented a mill at Dallas, Oregon, and also carried on business near Salem until 1859....

McEwen, Martha Grewell – Obituary

Old Pioneer Of Valley Dies At Toppenish Mrs. Martha Mcewen Passes Away After Lingering Illness Of Several Months Mrs. Martha Grewell McEwen, an old pioneer of this vicinity, passed away at Toppenish Sunday morning at 7 o’clock after a lingering illness which confined her to her bed for the past several months [died December 22, 1918]. Mrs. McEwen was born February 22, 1860, in Iowa, and three years later crossed the prairies in an ox team with her parents, settling at Vancouver, Wash. When she was 13 years old she moved to this vicinity where she has since made her home and where she has many friends. She was married in 1877 to Harvey McEwen, by whom she is survived. She has been a staunch member of the Christian Congregational church practically all her life. In addition to her husband she is survived by eight children. Four sons, Ed, Ernest, Clarence and Carl, all living at Toppenish, and a fifth son, Oscar, resides here [Ellensburg]. Two daughters, Mrs. Iva McElhinney, is of Seattle. She is also survived by two sisters, Mrs. William Taylor of Ellensburg and Mrs. Belle Little of Mabton; one brother, Clayton Grewell of White Bluffs, Wash., and three grandchildren, besides many other relatives. All of her children will be present for the funeral, but it is not known whether the brother and sister who live out of town can be here. The body arrived today from Toppenish and is now at the Bridgham undertaking parlors. The funeral will take place tomorrow morning at 10 o’clock from the parlors and interment will be made in the Odd...

Wigle, Malinda Jane Dixon – Obituary

Mrs. Malinda J. Wigle died in Mabton, Dec. 29, 1916, aged 86 years, 2 months and 13 days. Funeral services were held in the M. E. Church Sunday, and burial was in Mabton cemetery. Mrs. Wigle was a native of Illinois, residing there until her marriage to Thomas Grewell, and moved to Corydon, Iowa. In 1863 she, with her husband and family, started across the plains. When in Wyoming, her husband was taken ill and died at Independence Rock, Wyo. With her children she resumed her journey westward, arriving at Vancouver, Wash. the same year. Two years later she was united in marriage to Daniel D. Wigle, and to this union was born one child, Elizabeth Belle Little of Mabton, with whom she spent her last days. In 1902 she was again left a widow. She was one of the earliest pioneers of Kittitas Valley, going to that place in 1873. She was a devoted Christian, converted at an early age and uniting with the M. E. Church. [Listed as Wagle in the obit] The Mabton Chronicle, January 4, 1917 Contributed by: Shelli...
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