Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War,1 “when we had not a correct knowledge of the location of the Creek Indians nor of the features of the country.” This situation produced much unhappiness and contention between the people of the two tribes. The Indians had other grievances, and the Creeks took the lead in calling the attention of the officials to their needs by the preparation of a memorial in which they complained of frequent attacks upon them by bands of wild Indians from the south and west of their location. They asked the Government to appoint a commission to meet with them for the redress of their wrongs, and to call a council of the different tribes for the adoption of measures to establish peace and security in their new home. The Creek memorial and a long report by the Secretary of War on February 16, 1832, were transmitted to Congress by President Jackson,2 who recommended that three commissioners be appointed as requested in the memorial, and recommended by the Secretary. It appeared from the report of the Secretary of War that there were then west of the Mississippi twenty-five hundred Creeks, six thousand Choctaw, thirty-five hundred Cherokee and...

Biography of William Turnor Lewis

When death called William Tumor Lewis on the 30th of December, 1915, Racine lost one of its prominent pioneer manufacturers and capitalists, a man who was freely accorded honor and respect, not only because of the success which he had achieved, but also on account of the straightforward and commendable business principles which he always followed and the spirit of helpfulness which he manifested throughout his entire life. He never deviated from a course which he believed to be right in all of his relations with his fellowmen and his memory remains both as an inspiration and a benediction of those with whom he was associated. A native of New York, Mr. Lewis was born in Utica on the 10th of March, 1840, and received his early education in that city. In 1855, when a boy of fifteen, he became a resident of Racine and at an early age studied telegraphy under the guidance of his older brother, James F. Lewis, who afterward became chief justice of the supreme court of Nevada. At the outbreak of the Civil war Mr. Lewis was manager of the Racine office of the Western Union Telegraph Company and handled hundreds of messages relative to the great conflict. He soon enlisted in the Federal Military Telegraph Corps and was stationed at Cartersville, Georgia, at the headquarters of the Fifteenth Army Corps as military telegraph operator and railroad agent. On the 27th of October, 1864, Mr. Lewis was united in marriage to Mary Isabel Mitchell, a daughter of Henry Mitchell, deceased, who was the founder in 1834, of the business which later was incorporated as...

Biography of Barrett Williams

This venerable citizen of Boise City is believed to be the oldest man in the state of Idaho, as on the 7th of March 1899, he celebrated the ninety-sixth anniversary of his birth. He was sixty years of age when he came to this place for the first time, in 1862, and during the years which have intervened he has maintained his earnest interest in the development of the town and the resources of the surrounding country. He has always been strictly temperate in his habits, has led an active, industrious life, and is reaping his reward in the evening of his career, for he enjoys very good health, being sound in mind and body, possesses his senses of sight and hearing almost unimpaired, and still takes long walks about the town with perfect ease. The birth of this worthy old pioneer occurred in Wales, March 7, 1803, and in his native land he learned the saddler’s trade, in his youth. He never attended school a day, with the exception of Sunday school, where he learned to read, and when he grew to manhood he wished to be able to sign legal documents and so learned to write his name. In 1840 he came to the United States and for about a year worked at his trade as a harness-maker in Utica, New York, Licking County, not far from Granville. After four years of farming operations there he removed to Iowa county, Wisconsin, and during the next twelve years successfully carried on a farm. The praises of the great and growing west had been so long heard that at...

Biography of Alexander Duffes

The pretty, flourishing town of Nampa, Canyon County, was founded about thirteen years ago by Alexander Duffes, who has made his home here continuously since the nth of November, 1885, and has given his most earnest efforts toward the development and improvement of the town. At that time the railroad had been constructed through this section and a small station had been built at Nampa. Mr. Duffes, passing through, on his way to his old home in Canada, saw the possibilities of the place as a location for a town, and decided to cast his lot here. He obtained a quarter section of land of the government and laid part of it out into town lots, investing considerable money in improvements. He donated building sites to various denominations for churches, set aside a block for a schoolhouse, and in many ways pro-vided for the advancement of the citizens. His wisdom and foresight have been abundantly proven: the town has steadily grown, and it is now one of the most promising locations in the County. Many of the substantial business blocks and residences here were built by Mr. Duffes, and are monuments to his good taste and skill. A native of the state of New York, Alexander Duffes was born on the 26th of March 1839, in the town of Utica. His parents, John and Elizabeth (Ferrier) Duffes, were both natives of Scotland and in 1835 sailed across the sea to America, where they desired to found a new home. For a number of years they dwelt in the vicinity of Hamilton, Canada, the father working at his trade, that...

Mary Elizabeth Todd Brand of Utica NY

BRAND, Mary Elizabeth Todd8, (Zerah7, Jehiel6, Stephen5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born June 17, 1838, in Milford, Otsego County, N. Y., died June 30, 1871, in Utica, N. Y., married Oct. 8, 1867, in Oswego, N. Y., James H. Brand, who was born March 24, 1831. Child: I. Byron S., b. June 26, 1871, d. Aug. 24,...

Biography of James Porter Greves, M.D.

James Porter Greves, M. D., deceased, was familiarly known as the “Father of Riverside,” and well he deserved the title. He was the real founder of the Colony Association, the first to visit and select the land, and the first to occupy them, camping upon the desert plain now occupied by the city of Riverside, September 19, 1870. For nearly twenty years his life and life’s efforts were intimately interwoven with the history of Riverside and the colony. No man in the community was better known or more universally respected and esteemed than he. His death was sincerely mourned and left many an aching heart among his old friends and associates. Dr. Greves was born in Skaneateles, Onondaga County, New York, September 6, 1810. When a youth he was apprenticed to a printer in Utica, New York, and served four years. In 1828 he began the study of medicine under the tutorship of Dr. Batchelor, a well-known physician of that city, and at the age of twenty-one graduated from the Fairfield Medical College, and commenced the practice of his profession. In 1833 he marred Miss Helen Sandford, a native of Ovid, New York, and moved to Marshall, Michigan; there he followed his profession until the summer of 1845, when he removed to Milwaukee, and followed his profession there until 1859; then he went to St. Louis. Late in the fall he went to New Orleans, and spent the winter of 1859-’60; thence to Baton Rouge, with his brother, Samuel P. Greves, a lawyer, where he remained until June, 1860; thence to New York city. He remained there until March,...

Biography of William B. Ruggles

WILLIAM B. RUGGLES WILLIAM Benjamin Ruggles was born at Bath, Steuben County, N. Y., on the 14th of May, 1827. He is the son of William and Mary Ruggles. At the age of thirteen he was in a Bath printing office, trying to work his way up from the printer’s case, with the determination of becoming some day an educated man. At the same period he attended a part of the time the public school of Bath, with a view of preparing himself for a collegiate course. ” We remember him,” writes one, ” when a boy, as a studious youth, and call to mind the hours when we found him stretched out evenings on the old ‘ bank ‘ of the printing office studying his books by the aid of a tallow dip, fitting himself for entrance to Hamilton college.” In 1846 he had the great satisfaction of entering Hamilton college, in the sophomore class, though still obliged during vacation to set type in order to secure the necessary funds to carry him through college. He went through, graduating in 1849, with the highest honors of his class. And we venture to say that no graduate ever left the halls of that excellent institution of learning with more scholarly pride and satisfaction than did young Ruggles with his diploma in hand. While he had experienced the truth that there is “no royal road to learning,” he had also found that his industry and perseverance had overcome all obstacles in the way; and he stepped out into the world ready for its more active and stirring duties – an...

Biography of James Neild

JAMES NEILD – The Neild family came from the North of England. Thomas Neild, a native of Halifax, Yorkshire, England, a stone cutter by trade, now living in Jamestown, New York, was born on February 9, 1854, and came to America in 1882, locating first at Albion, New York, where he procured work in his trade. He later moved to HoVey, New York, and in 1893 came to Holyoke, Massachusetts, and entered the mill of the American Thread Company, working there for four years. After this he returned for a time to England, but later came back to America and settled in Jamestown, New York, where he has since been engaged in mill work. Soon after his arrival in this country he became an American citizen, joined the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and became an active member of the Methodist Church. Thomas Neild was married to Anna Rowlinson who, like himself, was of English birth; a native of Windhill, England, born March 9, 1850, and died in 1892. There were five children of the marriage: Frank Rowlinson, born in England. Sarah, born in England. James, of whom further. Clara. Florence. Thomas Neild married a second time and there is one son, John, of the second marriage. James Neild, son of Thomas Neild, was born in Albion, New York, March 3, 1884, educated in the schools of Holley, New York, came to Holyoke, Massachusetts, and went to work for the Farr Alpaca Company. When fifteen years of age he went to England and remained there four years in order to learn the trade of wool grading and sorting. After...

Pin It on Pinterest