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Jason H. Helms

Musician, Navy. Born in Union County; son of Mr. and Mrs. T. L. A. Helms. Entered service June 27, 1917, at Monroe, N.C. Sent to Norfolk, Va., and then transferred to U. S. S. “Minnesota,” then to U. S. S. “Utah.” On convoy and patrol duty off Irish Coast with “Utah.” Mustered out at Norfolk, Va., Aug. 12,...

Joseph A. Helms

Ensign, Navy. Born in Union County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. T. L. A. Helms. Entered service at Monroe June 1, 1917. Was sent to Brooklyn and from there to Norfolk, Va. Was sent to Engineering School in New York. Promoted to rank of Ensign July, 1919. Mustered out in New York, Aug.,...

Bryson Blake Belk

Sergt. Air Service Co., 80th Squadron; of Union County; son of S. E. and Mary Belk. Entered service Aug. 2, 1917, at Charlotte, N.C. Sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky., then to Kelly Field, Texas. Transferred to Long Island, N. Y. Sailed for France Dec. 25, 1918, 3rd Aviation Center. Promoted to rank of Corpl. Aug. 24, 1917, and then Sergt. Served 15 months in the Air Service overseas. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 8,...

Waxhaw Tribe

Waxhaw Indians. A small tribe that lived in the 17th century in what is now Lancaster County, South Carolina, and Union and Mecklenburg Counties, North Carolina. They were connected with the neighboring Sugeree, and both were apparently related to the Catawba, and therefore were Siouan. The custom of flattening the head, practiced by the Waxhaw, was also mentioned as a custom of the Catawba. Lederer (1672) says they were subject to and might be considered a part of the Catawba. Lawson visited the Waxhaw in 1701 and was hospitably received. He mentions two of their villages situated about 10 miles apart. He describes the people as very tall, and notes particularly their custom of artificially flattening the head during infancy. The dance ceremonies and councils were held in a council house, much larger than the ordinary dwellings. Instead of being covered with bark, like the domiciles, it was neatly thatched with sedge and rushes; the entrance was low, and around the walls on the inside were benches made of cane. Near the Waxhaw were the Catawba, or more likely a band of that tribe. They were probably so reduced by the Yamasee War of 1715 as to have been obliged to incorporate with the Catawba. For Further Study The following articles and manuscripts will shed additional light on the Waxhaw as both an ethnological study, and as a people. See Mooney, Siouan Tribes of the East,...

The Waxhaw and Sugeree Indians

The two small tribes bearing the above designations are hardly known except in connection with the Catawba Indians, with whom they were afterward incorporated. They may be treated together. The tribes lived, respectively, about Waxhaw and Sugar (i. e., Sugeree) creeks, two small streams flowing into Catawba River from the northeast, within, what is now Lancaster County, South Carolina, and Union and Mecklenburg counties, North Carolina. As previously mentioned (The Eno, Shoccoree, and Adshusheer indians) the Waxhaw practiced the custom of flattening the head, a custom probably followed also by the Catawba and other neighboring tribes, whence they were called Flatheads. The first notice of either tribe seems to be that of Lederer, who visited, the Wisacky (Warsaw) in 1672, and found them living next south of the Sara, i. e., about where they were afterward known. He dismisses them with the brief statement that they were subject to the Ushery (Catawba) and might be considered a part of that tribe1 . In 1701 Lawson visited the Waxhaw and was received in the most hospitable fashion. He mentions two of their villages as being situated 10 miles apart, showing that they might be considered a tribe of some importance at that time. From incidental references in Lawson’s work it is evident that at the time of his visit they were on good terms with their neighbors as well as with the Saponi farther toward the north. He says that the Waxhaw were very tall, and describes in detail their method of flattening the head. This was accomplished by laying the infant in a sort of cradle, consisting chiefly of...

Union County, North Carolina Cemetery Transcriptions

North Carolina Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the North Carolina county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Union County, North Carolina Tombstone Transcription Project) Baucom Family Cemetery Fincher Cemetery Helms-Pressley Cemetery Old Godwin Cemetery Pleasant Hill Baptist Church Cemetery Presson Cemetery Prospect United Methodist Church Cemetery...
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