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Lee, Claudia H. Swenson – Obituary

Claudia H. Lee, 95, resident of Tumwater for two years, died of natural causes Thursday, Aug. 10, 1995, in Mother Joseph Care Center. She was born May 3, 1900 in Gaylord, Minn., to Swen and Augusta (Erickson) Swenson. She married Melvin Lee on April 3, 1947 in Seattle. Mrs. Lee worked as a beautician and in the insurance industry. She belonged to Plymouth Congregational Church of Seattle. She enjoyed knitting and crocheting. She also liked gardening and flowers, crossword puzzles and spending time with her grandchildren and great grandchildren. Mrs. Lee is survived by her daughter, Rosemary Hortin, and husband, Dean, Olympia; three grandchildren; four great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, Melvin Lee. A memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 15, in Mother Joseph Care Center, Olympia. Minister Dr. Larry L. Speicher will officiate. Inurnment will be at a later date. [IOOF Cemetery, Ellensburg, WA] The family suggests memorial donations be made to Mother Joseph Care Center, Olympia. Arrangements are by Mills and Mills Funeral Directors, Olympia. Contributed by: Shelli...

Tumwater, Vancouver, Port Townsend, Washington

Tumwater, the initial point in the ‘history of the settlement of Puget Sound, was incorporated in Nov. 1869. In time it numbered more manufactories than any other town on the Sound. Vancouver and Early Settlers Vancouver was the fourth town in size in western Washington, having in 1880 about 3,000 inhabitants. It was made the county seat of Clarke County by the first legislative assembly of Washington, in March 1854, its pioneers, both English and American, long retaining their residences. Among the early settlers were James Turnbull, born in England, came to Washington in 1852, and with him William Turnbull, his nephew, long known in connection with steam boating on the Columbia. Both died in 1874. P. Ahern, born in Ireland, came to Vancouver with troops in 1832. Was elected county auditor in 1855, and representative in 1857. Stephen P. McDonald, born in Illinois, came with the immigration of 1852 to Washington. Engaged in printing, and was publisher of the Vancouver Register for a time. He represented Clarke County in the legislature in 1869, after which he was city recorder and clerk of the city council. He died Oct. 24, 1876. J. S. Hathaway, a native of New York, removed to Michigan when young, married in that state in 1847 and came to Clarke County in 1852. He was active in the volunteer service during the Indian war, and was afterward county judge. He died Jan. 12, 1876, at the age of 52 years. Levi Douthitt, born in North Carolina, immigrated in 1852, settling near Vancouver, where he resided until 1870, when he removed to Marion County, Oregon, where...

Biography of Hon. Clanrick Crosby

HON. CLANRICK CROSBY. – This gentleman, of whom an excellent portrait appears in our work, was born in East Brewster, Massachusetts, January 6 1838. He is a son of Captain Clanrick and Phoebe H. (Fessenden) Crosby. In 1849 he came with his parents via Cape Horn on board the brig Grecian, of which his father was captain and part owner. The father was a sea-faring man until his arrival in San Francisco in the above year. After a short stay there, he brought his vessel to Portland, and there selling her quit the sea. The family remained in Portland, Oregon, during the spring and summer of 1850, while Mr. Crosby, Sr., went to Milton, Oregon, where the family joined him during the summer, excepting the son Clanrick, who was attending school at Tualatin Academy at Forest Grove, then in its incipiency. In the fall of 1850, the father went to Puget Sound and purchased the famous water-power and mill property at Tumwater, Washington Territory (then Oregon), the family following him in the spring of 1851. Here the Captain resided until his death. When Clanrick had attained his majority, he learned the trade of wagon and carriage maker, which business he followed for five years. He then found employment in his father’s store for one year. Then, embarking in the manufacture of buckets, he introduced the first pail made by machinery in Washington Territory. After this he became a member of the firm of Leonard, Crosby & Cooper, and engaged in the manufacture of sashes and doors in Tumwater; but in six months he sold out and undertook a sawmilling...

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