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Slave Narrative of Polly Colbert

Person Interviewed: Polly Colbert Location: Colbert, Oklahoma Age: 83 I am now living on de forty-acre farm dat de Government give me and it is just about three miles from my old home on Master Holmes Colbert’s plantation where I lived when I was a slave. Lawsy me, times sure has changed since slavery times Maybe I notice it more since I been living here all de time, but dere’s farms ’round here dat I’ve seen grown timber cleared off of twice during my lifetime. Dis land was first cleared up and worked by niggers when dey was slaves. After de War nobody worked it and it just naturally growed up again wid all sorts of tress. Later, white folks cleared it up again and took grown trees off’n it and now dey are still cultivating it but it is most were cut now. Some of it won’t even sprout peas. Dis same land used to grow corn without hardly any work but it sure won’t do it now. I reckon it was on account of do rich land dat us niggers dat was owned by Indians didn’t have to work so hard as dey did in de old states, but I think dat Indian masters was just naturally kinder any way, leastways mine was. My mother, Idea, was owned by de Colbert family and my father, Tony, was owned by de Love family. When Master Holmes and Miss Betty Love was married dey fathers give my father and mother to dem for a wedding gift. I was born at Tishomingo and we moved to de farm on Red...

Biography of Captain George B. Hester

The name of Captain George B. Hester figures prominently on the pages of Oklahoma’s history. About the middle of the nineteenth century he became a resident of the Indian Territory and from that time forward left the impress of his individuality and ability upon the history of this great region which is now known as the state of Oklahoma. He was born in North Carolina on the 26th of March, 1832, and was a young man of but twenty-three years when in 1855 he came to the Indian Territory, settling at Tishomingo, in what is now Johnson County, then the capital of the Chickasaw Nation. There he established a store and his business as a merchant brought him into close relations with the Indians and with political and social affairs. His influence as a man of honor and fair dealing left a deep impress on the life of the community. The Indian people soon recognized his entire trust-worthiness and his advice and counsel were frequently sought. He possessed an unprejudiced mind of a judicial caste and his opinions were fair, impartial and ever given for the benefit of those who sought his aid. He worked untiringly for the peace and progress of the community in which he lived and thus aided in smoothing the way for the advent of the white settlers and for the new and better order of things existing in the state. On June 7, 1859, Captain Hester was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Fulton, who was then a missionary in the Indian country. She is a daughter of the Rev. D. T. Fulton, a...

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