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Mission’s Among the Southern Indians

In the year 1819 the Synod of South Carolina resolved to establish a mission among the Southern Indians east of the Mississippi river. The Cherokees, Muskogee’s, Seminoles, Choctaws and Chickasaws then occupied Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Rev. David Humphries offered to take charge of the intended mission. He was directed to visit the Indians, obtain their consent and select a suitable location. Rev. T. C. Stewart, then a young licentiate, offered himself as a companion to Mr. Humphries. They first visited the Muskogee’s (Creeks), who, in a council of the Nation, declined their proposition. They then traveled through Alabama into Mississippi, and proposed to establish a mission among the Chickasaws. They found them on the eve of holding a council of the Nation to elect a king. In that council, held in 1820, permission was granted the missionaries to establish missions in their Nation, and a charter was signed by the newly chosen king. The two missionaries then returned to South Carolina. During the return Mr. Humphries concluded that he was not called to preach to the untaught North American Indians. But the Rev. T. C. Stewart, during the same journey, firmly resolved to undertake the self-denying work, and offered to take charge of the contemplated mission. The Synod gladly accepted, and he at once commenced making preparations to enter upon the life of a missionary to the Chickasaws. In January 1821, he reached the place chosen for a station, and named it Monroe Station, in honor of James Monroe, the then president of the United States. Mr. Stewart was the only missionary. Two men, however, accompanied him...

Slave Narrative of Nathan Jones

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Nathan Jones Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Gibson County, Tennessee Date of Birth: 1858 Place of Residence: 409 Blake Street Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE NATHAN JONES-EX-SLAVE 409 Blake Street Nathan Jones was born in Gibson County, Tennessee in 1858, the son of Caroline Powell, one of Parker Crimm’s slaves. Master Crimm was very abusive and cruel to his slaves. He would beat them for any little offense. He took pleasure in taking little children from their mothers and selling them, sending them as far away as possible. Nathan’s stepfather, Willis Jones, was a very strong man, a very good worker, and knew just enough to be resentful of his master’s cruel treatment, decided to run away, living in the woods for days. His master sent out searchers for him, who always came in without him. The day of the sale, Willis made his appearance and was the first slave to be put on the block. His new master, a Mr. Jones of Tipton, Tennessee, was very kind to him. He said it was a real pleasure to work for Mr. Jones as he had such a kind heart and respected his slaves. Nathan remembers seeing slaves, both men and women, with their hands and feet staked to the ground, their faces down, giving them no chance to resist the overseers, whipped with cow hides until the blood gushed from their backs. “A very cruel way to treat human beings.” Nathan married very young, worked very hard, started buying a small orchard, but...

Biography of Dr. J.M. Wright

Dr. J. M. Wright has been an able and popular physician of Lake County for eighteen years, and was the son of Moses and Lericy (Farris) Wright. His father was born in Kentucky in 1812 and his mother in Giles County, Tennessee in 1814. When quite young he came to Tennessee, and married Miss Farris in Obion County, where they made their home. They had three sons, two of whom are farmers and stock raisers in Texas. Mrs. Wright was a Cumberland Presbyterian, but there being no church near her of that denomination, she united with the Methodists. In politics Mr. Wright was a Whig. He was an extensive farmer, and died in 1852. After his death Mrs. Wright spent a few years with her sons in Texas, then returned and lived with Dr. J. M. Wright until she died, in 1883. Dr. J. M. Wright was born April 24, 1837, in Obion County; was raised on the farm, receiving a good education. After studying medicine for a year under Dr. Horace Head, of Troy, Tennessee, he entered the medical department of the University of Louisiana, graduating there in 1861, locating at Troy; but the war commencing, he volunteered in Company B, of Twenty-seventh Tennessee Infantry, Confederate Army, as first lieutenant. He was soon disabled by ill health and returned home, soon after returning as assistant medical surgeon. In 1865 he was invited to go before the medical board to be examined for a position in the navy, but failed to reach his destination in time, as the greater part of the railroad route was torn up. For two...

Biography of G. W. McDowell

This gentleman is one of the oldest and most reliable merchants of Yellville, and is in every way deserving the large patronage which he commands. He has been a resident of the town since 1868, but owes his nativity to the Old Dominion, where he first opened his eyes upon the light April 12, 1832, his parents being Thomas and Rebecca (Lytle) McDowell, the former of whom was born on the Isle of Erin, and came with a brother to the United States about 1800. He-settled in Virginia and his brother in one of the Carolinas, and he became a very wealthy farmer and trader. He was a finely educated gentleman and of unblemished reputation, and left the heritage of an honorable name as well as a goodly property to his descendants. He was born in 1780 and died in 1840. He was married after coming to the United States to a Miss Patton, who bore him five children, two of whom are living: John, of Batesville, Arkansas, and Elizabeth, of Texas. His second mar-riage took place in Virginia, and was to the mother of the subject of this sketch, by whom he became the father of ten children, four now living: Mary, of Summerville, Ore.; G. W.; Cyrus D., who is also in Summerville, Ore.; Virginia, of Howell County, Missouri Four of the others grew up, David, Thomas, Sarah and Missouri, and two died young. None of the sons took part in the Civil War except Cyrus D., who was a soldier in the Union Army. Thomas McDowell emigrated to Missouri in 1835, and after five years’ residence...

Biography of Milton G. Cage

Among the practitioners at the Boise bar holding marked prestige among the members of the legal fraternity is Milton G. Cage. A native of Tennessee, he was born in Tipton County, near Covington, that state, January 26, 1862, and is descended on both sides from prominent old families of the south. His paternal ancestors came originally from Wales and established a home in America at an early period in our country’s history. His father, Gustavus Adolphus Cage, was born in Middleton, Tennessee, and married Miss Charlotte A. Green, a native of North Carolina. His father was formerly a planter and during the greater part of his life has been identified with the ministry of the Methodist church. He is now living in Colorado, at the age of eighty years. His mental faculties remain unimpaired, and he is still occasionally seen preaching in different pulpits, as opportunity calls. Milton G. Cage was only ten years of age when he accompanied his parents on their removal to Colorado. He was graduated in the high school of Greeley, that state, in the class of 1882, and then, determining to make the practice of law his life work, he became a student in the office of his brother-in-law, Hon. Samuel P. Rose, a prominent attorney of Denver. Lender his preceptorage he continued his reading until the fall of 1883, when he was matriculated in the Michigan State University, where he was graduated, on the completion of the law course, in 1885. He then began the practice of his chosen profession in Denver, and in 1886 was appointed assistant United States attorney under Henry...

Biography of Nathaniel Malone Mitchell

Nathaniel Malone Mitchell; whose many friends call him “Nat,” is well known to the automobile trade of Muskogee. Enterprise and commendable ambition prompted him to enter upon a line of business which he recognized as a growing one. He determined to reap some of the benefits enjoyed in connection with the constantly increasing use of the motor cars and has wisely directed his efforts into this field of commerce, his labors being attended with gratifying success. Mr. Mitchell is a native of Tennessee, his birth having occurred in Mason, Tipton county, on the 26th of September, 1882. He is a son of the Hon. Samuel H. and Anna Alexander (Clement) Mitchell. The father was a prominent planter of Tennessee, who owned and successfully conducted a large tract of land; nor was his attention confined solely to business affairs. On the other hand he recognized the duties and obligations of citizenship and his fellow townsmen, appreciating his ability and public spirit, chose him to represent them in the state senate. Nathaniel Malone Mitchell, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, acquired a public school education and when he started out in the business world he secured a position as a traveling salesman. For eight years he remained on the road and built up a substantial trade for the houses which he represented. Moreover, he gained valuable experience in salesmanship and this knowledge has been of great benefit to him since starting in business on his own account. In the year 1913 Mr. Mitchell arrived in Muskogee and here aided in organizing the Wright Motor Car Company, distributors of the...

Biographical Sketch of George W. Cross

George W. Cross, a prominent lawyer of Manchester, Tennessee, was born in Anderson County August 31, 1849. He is the son of William and Jane (Black) Cross, both of English descent and natives of Anderson County. The former, born in 1810, is still living; the latter, born about 1820, died February 26, 1885. Married in 1836 the elder Cross-engaged in farming. He is a democrat, and sympathizes with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church of which his wife was a member. Our subject, the fifth of eight children, was educated chiefly at Cumberland University, at Lebanon, Tennessee, and the military school of Knoxville, Tennessee, from which he graduated in 1874. After three years’ teaching in Decherd and Salem, Tennessee, in September 1877, he took ten months at Vanderbilt University Law Department, and the professor granted him license to practice. Since 1878, when he came to Manchester, he has become one of the most successful lawyers of Coffee County and among the ablest in this section. January 17, 1882, he married Beulah Hickerson, born in 1861, the daughter of Judge W. P. Hickerson. She was a cultured lady. Her death occurred July 24, 1885. Mr. Cross is a decided...

Tipton County, Tennessee Cemetery Transcriptions

Tennessee Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Tennessee county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Tipton County, Tennessee Tombstone Transcription Project) Chapman Cemetery Old Salem Cemetery  ...

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