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Biography of Judge M. V. Harrison

JUDGE M.V. HARRISON. – This early builder of Arlington, Oregon, and highly esteemed gentleman, was born in West Virginia in December, 1857, and in 1865 accompanied his parents to Indiana. He enjoyed educational advantages in a graded school at Dayton, gaining a good foundation for his later studies. In 1877 he began reading law under J.R. Carnahan at Lafayette, Indiana, but after a year abandoned this project and formed the purpose of learning the requirements and forms of mercantile life, and in pursuance of this plan accepted a position as clerk in a store. In 1880 he sought a larger life upon our Pacific coast and came hither, locating in the Yakima country. The following year he undertook the hard and adventurous trip back across the Rocky Mountains as one of the drovers of a band of cattle to Cheyenne. In the fall of 1882 he returned to our coast, locating at Arlington, where he opened a store, having an excellent assortment of goods, – the first stock of the kind placed in Arlington. In 1883 he disposed of this business and engaged with Mr. J.W. Smith, who had in the meantime brought in a very large stock of goods. In 1883 he established the hardware business, which he still manages with satisfactory results. In his public relations, Mr. Harrison has been active and efficient. He has served as councilman in the city of Arlington ever since its incorporation, being at present a member of the board. In December, 1888, he was appointed county judge to fill the unexpired term of W.W. Steiwer. He is a member of the...

Biography of Daniel Johnson

DANIEL JOHNSON. – Among the pioneers of Oregon, no one bore a better reputation than the subject of this sketch, whose doors were always open to the homeless stranger, and whose memory will be fondly cherished by the many who have been sheltered and fed by him. Daniel Johnson was born in 1812 in Berkshire county, Massachusetts, and at ten years of age removed with his parents to Onondaga county, New York, remaining with them some thirteen years, and doing any kind of work he could get to do. However, during the latter part of this time, he labored at stone-masonry. Right here we cannot forbear citing the reader to one piece of labor performed by him. In 1883 H. Johnson, son of Daniel, while traveling through that section of New York, paid a visit to an old fashioned cobble-stone house built by his father in the year 1835, and which is really as firm and solid as when it was first completed, the couple for whom it was built still occupying it. In the year 1837, Mr. Johnson, leaving friends and home, struck out for the “old West.” Arriving in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, he labored at masonry, plastering, as foreman in a large pork-packing establishment, and breaking prairie lands, until 1844, within which time he had accumulated property to the value of about seven hundred dollars. During the time he lived in Indians, he met and won the love of Miss Elsina Perkins, whom he married January 22, 1844. She was born in Cattaraugus county, New York, in 1828, and was the daughter of Eli and Sallie Perkins,...

Biography of James Johnson

JAMES JOHNSON. – James Johnson, a pioneer of 1844, son of James Johnson of Berkshire county, Massachusetts, was born on his father’s farm in 1814, and as a child moved with his parents to a new home in Onondaga county, New York, living there until he attained his manhood. In 1836 he gave rein to the desire for change and adventure and freedom, which ultimately made of him one of the early pioneers of Oregon, going in that year with his brother Daniel to Tippecanoe county, Indiana, and engaging in work as carpenter near Lafayette. In the winters, when there was little building on hand, he gave attention to pork-packing, becoming an expert and commanding a good salary. In 1839 he began a substantial domestic life, marrying Miss Juliet, daughter of Eli Perkins of Tippecanoe county. During these and the following years, however, he was hearing much about the great new West, the land of Oregon; and his natural craving to form and enjoy a career unhampered by the restrictions of life in the older communities made him anxious to come to the Pacific coast. In 1844 he was able to accomplish his purpose. In April, in company with his brother Daniel, and with John and Eli Perkins and Ruel Olds, he procured his outfit and proceeded to the rendezvous near Independence. There they found a considerable company assembled, among whom may be named Joseph Smith, Barton Lee, Colonel Ford, Captain Levi Scott, Captain Bennett and Captain Hedges. In all there were one hundred wagons; and Ford was chosen captain. It was late in May before the caravan moved....

Biography of Hon. Philip A. Marquam

HON. P.A. MARQUAM. – Judge Marquam is one of our most substantial citizens, whose faith in the Pacific Northwest, and in Portland in particular, has been rewarded by a fourfold recompense. A genial gentleman, adding to his native force of will and business sagacity refined literary tastes and love of natural beauty, he is now, in his hale, ripe years, a man most delightful to meet, and whose acquaintance or friendship is a valuable possession. His further claims, which are numerous, upon the recognition of society and history, will appear as this sketch proceeds. His father, Philip W. Marquam, a cabinet-maker, came from England at the age of twenty, and settled in Maryland, marrying Charlotte Mercer Poole, a daughter of the wealthy planter upon whose manor now stands Poolesville. It was near Baltimore that our subject was born, February 28, 1823. By sickness and financial misfortune the father was induced to seek a new home at the West, locating first in Ohio, but soon afterwards in Tippecanoe county, Indiana. There he entered an eighty-acre tract of government land, which was “just as God had made it,” – nowise despoiled of tree or bush. But father and mother and the ten children, of whom Philip was the eighth, went to work with vim and discretion, and pressed back the woods from about the cabin, bringing at length as much as half of the farm into cultivation. As the children grew up they began to press out into the world, feeling after a career. The daughters, of whom there were six, received fine educations, married and settled near their old home...

Biography of Matthew Patton

MATTHEW PATTON. – This well-known and now venerable pioneer was born in Monongahela county, Virginia, November 15, 1805. As a child he moved with his parents to Highland county, Ohio, and four years later to Brown county, remaining until he was sixteen years old. Being naturally mechanical, he was sought and gladly received as an apprentice to a cabinet business by a certain Mr. Eli Collins, and at the end of four years of diligent application mastered the trade. Being young and ambitious, he turned his face to the far West, as Ohio, Indiana and Illinois were then called. After five years of labor and saving, he established a cabinet business at La Fayette, Indiana. In that city he wedded the daughter of Joshua and Ellen Grimes of Adams county, Ohio, on the 15th of April, 1830. Owing to the scarcity of money, and the limited demand for the products of his skill, he was obliged to take produce from the farmers as pay in exchange for his goods; and, having a large surplus of manufactured stuff, he determined to build a flatboat, load her with furniture, and embark for New Orleans. After encountering many dangers and hardships, he accomplished the trip, exchanging his load for merchandise; and, returning, he established himself as a merchant at Frankfort, Indiana. He removed subsequently to Newtown, and thence to the locality where he laid out and founded the town of Pattonsburg, Missouri, which he made his home until 1847, building during that time a saw and grist mill. Learning, however, of the vast resources of Oregon, and having had much trouble with...

Biography of Jesse Newton Dick

Jesse Newton Dick. The communities which do not have the proportion of intelligent retired farmers, many of whom are capitalists, as residents lack an element that may be one of great importance. The farmer’s life leads to thought and contemplation and a man who through his own toilsome efforts can acquire a competency and retire to enjoy it while yet in middle life must be possessed of excellent judgment, which should be a valuable addition to community life. He should be a man with clearer views concerning many things and more able to give sensible advice and offer practical suggestions in regard to the everyday problems that have to be settled when interests clash, as they do in congested sections contrasted with the larger freedom of country life. In the pleasant town of Philo may be found fine examples of the retired farmer who have become exceedingly useful members of this community, and one who was held in general esteem was Jesse Newton Dick, who was called from this life on the 10th of August, 1917. He lies buried in the Maharry Cemetery near Wingate, Indiana. Jesse N. Dick was born in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, December 7, 1857. His parents were Eli H. and Jane P. (Maharry) Dick, the former of whom was born at Baltimore, Maryland, August 15, 1822, and the latter in Indiana, February 10, 1829. They came to Champaign County in 1878 and settled on a farm in Philo Township which Mr. Dick had purchased in 1876. He carried on the usual agricultural industries here during the rest of his active life, and died at Philo...

Biographical Sketch of Frank L. Bishop

Frank L. Bishop, proprietor of the Bee-Hive store, dealer in dry goods and notions, boots and shoes, etc. Charleston; was born in Mt. Vernon Co., Ohio, Nov. 20, 1846; he is a son of Stephen and Joanna (Bane) Bishop, and came with his father’s family to Coles Co., as stated in his fathers biography; he was engaged as a clerk for Mathews, Alexander & Co., in Charleston, for three years, after which he spent three years in La Fayette, Ind; he then engaged in general merchandising in Loving-ton, Ill., the firm being Dickson & Bishop; after remaining there three years, he returned to Charleston and established his present business in September,...

Biographical Sketch of S. E. Ray

S. E. Ray, dealer in dry and fancy goods, boots and shoes, etc., Charleston; was born near Montpelier, Vt., Aug. 5, 1833; in early childhood, he accompanied his parents to Geauga Co. (now Lake), Ohio; there, his father resided until his death, and his mother still resides there; at about the age of 20 years, Mr. Ray went to La Fayette, Ind., and engaged as a traveling salesman for Luce Brothers in the stationery business; and, after remaining with them four years, went to Chicago, and for about six years traveled for the well-known stationery house of Culver, Page, Hoyne & Co., establishing the Memphis branch of that house, under the name of C. H. Chamberlain & Co., which continued until after the breaking-out of the war; in 1862, he returned to Chicago, and the following year came to Charleston and engaged in the livery business; in 1875, he disposed of his business, and engaged in merchandising. Mr. Ray was married March 31, 1863, to Miss Josephine Bunnell, of Charleston; she died Sept. 18, 1867, leaving one child-Henrietta, since deceased. He was married again Dec. 10, 1867, to Mrs. Elizabeth J. Willhoit, of Edgar Co., Ill., and has one child -Samuel A. Mr. Ray is President of the Board of Education of Charleston, of which he has been a member for the .past two years, and has served two terms on the Board of...
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