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Biography of Hon. Clanrick Crosby

HON. CLANRICK CROSBY. – This gentleman, of whom an excellent portrait appears in our work, was born in East Brewster, Massachusetts, January 6 1838. He is a son of Captain Clanrick and Phoebe H. (Fessenden) Crosby. In 1849 he came with his parents via Cape Horn on board the brig Grecian, of which his father was captain and part owner. The father was a sea-faring man until his arrival in San Francisco in the above year. After a short stay there, he brought his vessel to Portland, and there selling her quit the sea. The family remained in Portland, Oregon, during the spring and summer of 1850, while Mr. Crosby, Sr., went to Milton, Oregon, where the family joined him during the summer, excepting the son Clanrick, who was attending school at Tualatin Academy at Forest Grove, then in its incipiency. In the fall of 1850, the father went to Puget Sound and purchased the famous water-power and mill property at Tumwater, Washington Territory (then Oregon), the family following him in the spring of 1851. Here the Captain resided until his death. When Clanrick had attained his majority, he learned the trade of wagon and carriage maker, which business he followed for five years. He then found employment in his father’s store for one year. Then, embarking in the manufacture of buckets, he introduced the first pail made by machinery in Washington Territory. After this he became a member of the firm of Leonard, Crosby & Cooper, and engaged in the manufacture of sashes and doors in Tumwater; but in six months he sold out and undertook a sawmilling...

Biography of Francis H. Cook

FRANCIS H. COOK, – Mr. Cook was born in Marietta, Ohio, in 1851. He went with his parents to Iowa at the age of twelve. His father was a farmer, and have his attention to agriculture and to sawmilling; but it was decided to make a printer of the boy. He was accordingly apprenticed to work at the cases in the office of the Harrison County Union, a paper owned and edited by Judge Henry Ford, who was also sitting on the bench of the northwest district of Iowa. The journal changed proprietors quite frequently, young Cook remaining through the two administrations succeeding Judge Ford’s; but, at the next call for a change, he and another ambitious young man embraced the opportunity to buy the Union themselves, conducting it a year and a half. But feeling the need of a more complete intellectual equipment, the young journalist sold out his share and attended Iowa State University. His studies there were cut short at the end of the second year by the failure of the man to whom he had sold, making his notes worthless. He had, however, fifteen dollars, earned at Iowa City; and with this for capital he set forth at the age of nineteen to see the world. His printer’s trade gave him employment. There is never so care-free a traveler as the compositor; and young cook saw the inside workings of newspaper offices all the way from the Burlington Hawkeye to the New York Tribune, stopping a few weeks or a few months at any city where he could learn most and where the wages were...

Biography of A. H. Chambers

A.H. CHAMBERS. – This wealthy and influential resident of Olympia is a native of Washington Territory, and a son of one of the earliest pioneers, his parents having crossed the plains to Oregon in 1844. Andsworth was born near Olympia, at Chambers Prairie, June 25, 1851. He began his career at the early age of twelve as a herder of stock, and continued in this business until nineteen years of age, acquiring thereby a knowledge of life and of practical affairs which has been of great value. At the above age, in partnership with his father, he successfully established a butcher business at Olympia, and in 1881 enlarged it by the purchase of his father’s interest, conducting it himself for the following eight years. In the spring of 1889, he disposed of his retail business, and now confines himself to stock-raising and the wholesale butcher business. In 1888 he erected the beautiful building which bears his name, a view of which, together with his own portrait, appears in this work. Although beginning with small means, Mr. Chambers early mastered the art of attending to his business with close attention, and has thereby gained a competency, never, however, resorting to miserly, avaricious methods, nor relying upon fortune, nor taking advantage of his fellow-man. There is no more enterprising citizen in the capital city, nor indeed in the state, than A.H. Chambers; and every enterprise which tends to public improvement or benefit finds in him a warm supporter. As an illustration of his extensive business relations, we may mention that he has a controlling interest in the Gas and Electric Light...

Biographical Sketch of Hon. Melancthon Z. Goodell

HON. MELANCTHON Z. GOODELL. – The family of which this pioneer is a member has ever been prominent and influential in the Pacific Northwest since its arrival hither. Jothan W. Goodell, the father was a pioneer of Ohio; and it was at Vermilion that Melancthon was born in 1837. In 1850 the family crossed the plains, the eight children being deemed no serious hindrance. A stop-over was made at Salt Lake one winter; and it has been thought that they missed but little a great calamity from Mormon treachery. Reaching Portland in 1851, they made their first home in Polk county, Oregon, but in 1853 removed to Grand Mound, Washington Territory. When the Indian war broke out, young Melancthon enlisted in Captain Hay’s Company, serving ten months. At the dawn of peace following this troublesome period, he leased a farm in Lewis county, and was engaged in agriculture until 1860. His next home was near Elma, where he lived on a farm more than twenty years. In 1883 he occupied his present residence at Montesano, Washington, engaging in business as dealer in lumber and in real estate, being thus employed at present. His public services have been important and various, – two terms as sheriff and two terms as assessor of Chehalis county. In 1882 he held a seat in the legislature, to which he was re-elected in 1884. He is at present mayor of Montesano. He was married in 1858 to Miss Rebecca Byles, a native of Kentucky, but an early resident of Thurston county. They have eight...

Biography of Hon. William F. Keady

HON. WM. F. KEADY. – “The pen is mightier than the sword;” and the editor is greater than the captain. He is not simply a gossip and talker, but a thinker. The man who has grown up in a newspaper office can make his way in the world wherever a way is possible, and becomes a pillar in society. This is the case with Mr. Keady, who was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1821. He learned the printer’s trade, and entered the printing office of the Iroquois Journal at Middleport, Illinois, in 1852. Within six months he was half owner of the paper, and at length purchased the entire interest. He conducted this publication four years, until the formation of the Republican party, of which he became an active supporter. Having conducted his paper as a Democratic organ, he found it necessary now to sell it out, but continued living in Middleport until 1867. Entering the newspaper business once more, he purchased a half interest in the Kankakee Gazette, staying with it two years, and, after a short residence in Iroquois county, purchased a job office in Kankakee, Illinois, and published The Times continuously for twelve years. In 1881 he felt the drift towards the Pacific coast, and upon reaching Olympia, and observing its beautiful residences and extensive views, felt no inclination to go farther, but there set his stakes, and has since remained. He was elected justice of the peace soon after his arrival, and has held the office continuously. As school director he has interested himself deeply in educational matters. He has a delightful residence; and...

Biography of Hon. Charles H. Mason

HON. CHARLES H. MASON. – Mr. Mason was born at Fort Washington, on the Potomac river, Maryland, in 1830. At the age of seven, with his widowed mother, he removed to Providence, Rhode Island. He graduated in 1850 with distinguished honors at Brown University, and was admitted to the bar of Rhode Island in 1851. On the election of President Pierce, he was recommended by the Rhode Island bar for the office of United States district attorney for that state. On the declination of the secretaryship of Washington Territory by Major Farquaharson, in September, 1853, Mr. Mason received the appointment and arrived in the territory in October, and continued in office until his death. It was, however, as acting governor of the territory through several critical periods that he distinguished himself, and endeared himself to our people. His first gubernatorial services were from March 26, 1854, to December 1st of that year. Again, when Governor Stevens went to the Blackfoot Council at Fort Benton, from May 12, 1855, he acted as governor until January 19, 1856. It was during this time that the Indian war was inaugurated; and his administration during the trying months of October, November and December was marked with energy, decision and wisdom. He immediately called for volunteers. He wisely and promptly separated the friendly from the hostile, humanely treating all Indians as friendly who were not arrayed with the hostiles, or had not broken out into actual hostility. He proclaimed the country from Olympia to the Snohomish river on the eastern side of the Sound as war ground, and established the friendly Indians upon the...

Biographical Sketch of Alexander C. McClelland

ALEXANDER C. McCLELLAND. – The present registrar of the United States land-office at La Grande, Oregon, is a native of Indiana, having been born there in 1842. He received his education at the Berlin High School, Wisconsin, and in 1863 came west to Montana as a gold-seeker. He found the employment of his intellectual acquisition more profitable, however, and for a number of years engaged in school-teaching and educational work in the Willamette valley. In 1867 we find him in the mines at Baker City, looking after “lodes” and “leads,” and also in 1870 engaged in the stock business with his present partner, B.W. Bartholomew. In 1874 he was married to Miss Mary, the only daughter of the pioneer David J. Chambers, of Chambers Prairie. Engaging in business at Olympia with A.H. Chambers, three years were spent until a change to the dryer climate of Baker county became necessary from considerations of health. In 1879 he sold his stock ranch, and located the next year at Island City, following such pursuits as were suited to the condition of his health. He is at present residing at La Grande, having been appointed as head of the land-office of that district by President...

Biography of Hon. Robert C. Hill

HON. ROBERT C. HILL. – Mr. Hill, one of the most responsible men of Washington, and a pioneer of an early day, was born in Hatboro, Pennsylvania, September 14, 1829, the son of Doctor John Hill, his mother’s maiden name having been Eliza L. Davis. At the age of seven he moved with his parents to Philadelphia, and received his education at the excellent grammar and high schools of that city. He entered upon a business career as clerk in a wholesale dry-goods store in the city, and followed that occupation four years. In 1848 he removed with his parents to New Jersey. In 1850, with his father and two brothers, he came to the new empire on the Pacific shore, making the trip via Panama, and arriving in San Francisco on board the steamer New World in July. In partnership with his father he opened a lumber yard at that city, and a year later tried the fortunes and vicissitudes of life in the mines, but shortly afterwards accepted a position as manager of the ranch of his brother in Sonoma valley. Seeking for something better to the north, he arrived at Whidby Island in February, 1853, and found located there his brothers Nathaniel D. and Humphrey, who had located in the fall of 1852. He took an adjoining place, and with them went to the Indian war. In 1862 he returned to California, and in that state and in Nevada engaged in the hazardous business of mining, remaining thus occupied with the exception of one year spent at the East, until 1867. Coming back to Whidby in...

Biography of A. B. Rabbeson

A.B. RABBESON. – Mr. Rabbeson, who observes that “he was born of rich but honest parents” at New York in 1824, was devoted from his youth to the most interesting and desperate adventures. Nevertheless, he was always delivered from his perils just at the right time, and lives to-day in hale age at Olympia. His boyish adventures began not many years after the death of his father in 1833. His step-father he did not like, and consequently left home. We find him out in Canada, soon at New York City with his grandparents and attending school, but within a few months on a coasting ship to Florida, where, with two mutinous sailors, he left ship and wandered through Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky to Cincinnati, where his companions left him to shift for himself. Making his way to Columbus, Ohio, he obtained steady work, but also found and read the biography of a Rocky Mountain man, which fired his mind with a burning youthful desire to go West and try it for himself. Nevertheless, it was not until after more wanderings in Canada, a short period at buffalo, a trip on the lakes, and a few years in the old West, – Ohio and Illinois, – that he finally got his feet on the Oregon trail; for it was mythic Oregon which was his lure. The autumn of 1846 found his party broken down and given out on the steep brow of Laurel Hill. Young Rabbeson was the one to go down to Foster’s on the Clackamas and obtain of that kind-hearted gentleman five yoke of oxen free,...

Biography of Elisha H. Lewis

ELISHA H. LEWIS. – This well-known gentlemen was born in New York in 1824. He was raised on a farm, and received a common-school education at his home on the slopes of the Catskill Mountains. In 1845 he went to Chicago and thence to Wisconsin, where he worked as millwright until 1849. Coming in that year by the Isthmus to California, he was mining in several camps with the usual checkered luck of those days, making a return to the “States” for a visit. In the spring of 1852 he returned by water to California, and in the fall of the same year came on to Oregon, locating at Portland and engaging as carpenter with Porter & Carson. In 1853 he removed to Rainier, continuing in his work as carpenter and builder. In January, 1855, he was married to Miss Harriet L. Barlow of Cowlitz county, Washington Territory, who crossed the plains from Michigan in1852. In 1854 they removed to Vancouver, where he operated as contractor for six years. In 1862 he sought a new and more permanent location in Eastern Oregon, and laid the claim where the town of North Union now stands. In 1863 he moved his family and effects to the new location, and together they have seen the town of Union grow from one log cabin, constructed by themselves, into a beautiful town embowered with beautiful fruit and ornamental trees, and boasting of a population of one thousand people. Mr. Lewis has identified himself with the development of the place in many ways, having not only erected the first log cabin and the first house...
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