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Genealogy of Joseph Baker of Marshfield Massachusetts

Z173. NICHOLAS BAKER: probable father of Z174 SAMUEL BAKER: made Freeman in 1657; m. Eleanor Winslow. Z175 KENELIN BAKER: b. 1657; m. Sarah Bradford. Z176. KENELIN BAKER: b. 1695; m. Patience Dolen. Z177 WILLIAM BAKER: b. Oct. 16, 1734; m. Hannah Lincoln. Z178 WILLIAM BAKER: b. Sept. 10, 1759; m. Abigail Low. Z179 JOSEPH BAKER: b. Marshfield, Mass., Sept. 24, 1794; m. Olive Cushing. Z180 JOSEPH BAKER: b. Marshfield, Mass., Feb. 27, 1827; m. Martha Jane Perrin. Sarah James: b. Thompson, Conn. a181 JAMES BAKER: b. Nov. 28, 1824; m. Lydia Ann Mentzer, b. Jan. 8, 1826; had John, James, Emma, Susie and Abraham. Abraham: b. July 21, 1860; m. Sophia Jane Graham (b. 1864) on Dec. 23, 1885. William: b. 1887; m. Elizabeth Fry. Beuford. James. Ralph: b. 1889. Arthur: b. 1890. b182. JACOB HULL BAKER: b. Jan. 10, 1838, in Allegany Co., Md.; m. Julia Harriett Dudley of Virginia. She was born Feb. 20, 1858, in Glade Hill. Was a breeder of thoroughbred horses; d. 1903. Thomas Dudley: b. Nov. 6, 1898, at Lyons, Mont. Graduate of the Montana State School of Mines in 1923. Mining engineer for the Anaconda Copper Mining Co. of Butte. Mary H.: b. Jan. 18, 1900, at Lyons, Mont.% 9Graduate of the University of Washington, and teacher of Art at the Montana State Normal School. c183 O. O. BAKER: descendant of a family that came to America about 1750, settled in Clarion County, Pa., and later moved West; m. Louise Kloepfer. E. R. Baker: b. Feb. 28, 1889, Cleveland, Ohio; m. Florence E. Nickels, Dec. 31, 1917. Neal Ellis: b. Jan. 22,...

Biography of James W. and Elisha S. Converse

The descent of the Converse family, of Thompson, from Roger de Coigneries, one of the trusted chieftains of William the Conqueror, has been elsewhere given in this volume, and need not be repeated here.. The first member of the family to emigrate from England to America was Deacon Edward Convers, who settled in Woburn, Mass. His grandson, Samuel Convers, in 1710 removed to, Thompson parish, then Killingly, and became the progenitor of all branches of the family who bear the name, in Thompson. In the line of descent was Edward Convers, whose son Jonathan was the father of Deacon Jonathan Converse (the orthography of the name having been at this time changed), who resided in Thompson. His son, Elisha Converse, born in 1786, married, in 1807 Betsey, daughter of Deacon James Wheaton, of the same town. Their sons, James W. and Elisha Slade Converse, are the subjects of this biography. James W. Converse was born in Thompson, Windham county, Conn., January 11th, 1808, and in early youth removed with his parents successively to Woodstock, in the same county, to Dover and Needham, Mass. In 1821, while yet a mere lad, he started for Boston, a poor boy, and there began an eventful, useful and very successful career. He obtained employment with his uncles, Joseph and Benjamin Converse, who afterward assisted him to begin business in the Boylston Market. In 1832 he formed a co-partnership with William Hardwick, for the purpose of conducting the boot, shoe and leather business in Boston. One year later he joined Isaac Field in the hide and leather trade. Later he became a partner of...

Biography of Aaron White

Aaron White died at Quinebaug, in the town of Thompson, April 15th, 1886, aged 87 years and six months. He was born in Boylston, Mass., October 8th, 1798, and was the eldest of ten children, seven sons and three daughters, of Aaron and Mary White. His ancestry were of the early puritan settlers of Eastern Massachusetts, and among them on the side of his mother, were the Adams’ of Boston, her grandmother being a sister of Governor Samuel Adams, a distinguished patriot of the revolution. His father kept a country store, cultivated an adjoining farm, was a leading man in town affairs, town clerk for twenty-two years, many years a member of the board of selectmen, and repeatedly a representative to the legislature. The father having determined to give his son, Aaron, Jr., the advantages of a liberal education, sent him to the academies in New Salem and Leicester, and in his fourteenth year the boy entered Harvard, graduating in the class of 1817. Having concluded to establish himself in the practice of law in Rhode Island, Mr. White after a brief period of study in the offices of General George L. Barnes, of Woonsocket, in Smithfield, and of the late judge Thomas Burgess, of Providence, was admitted to the bar of Rhode Island, at Providence, at the September term of the supreme court, 1820 a little under twenty-two years of age, and opened his office at Cumberland Hill, in the town of Cumberland. A mail route was laid out over Cumberland Hill, and the office of postmaster there was held by him until he removed to Woonsocket Falls...

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