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Biography of John E. French

John E. French, one of the leading men of affairs of Bradford, Merrimack County, was born in this town. February 27, 1843. He is a son of Daniel French, and the grandson of Offin French, an early settler of Bradford. Offin French was born in South Hampton, N.H., in 1761; and when but a boy he entered Paskey Pressy, one of the brave soldiers who enlisted from Warner; and after the war was over he came to Bradford, N.H., and, continuing the acquaintance formed on the battlefield, met, wooed, and won as his wife, Susannah, a daughter of Mr. Pressy. After marriage the young couple settled on a farm one-half mile east of Bradford Centre; and here were born and reared their children, thirteen in number. Offin French lived to the age of threescore years and ten; and his wife, who was born some years later than he, died within the remembrance of her grandson, John E., at the age of eighty-seven years. Daniel French came into possession of the old homestead, and cared for his parents in their declining years. He afterward settled on a place a third of a mile north-east of Bradford, where he farmed for twenty-eight years, removing then to the village, in which he lived until his death in 1867, aged threescore and ten years. His wife survived him, dying in 1876, aged seventy-six years. Her maiden name was Abigail Cressy. She was born in Bradford, and was a daughter of John Cressy, whose father was a soldier in the French and Indian War, and also in the Revolution, probably serving from Bradford. Daniel...

Biography of William Gregg Andrews

William Gregg Andrews, a prosperous farmer of Sutton, Merrimack County, N.H., was born July 7, 1834, on the farm upon which he now lives. His father was Nathan Andrews, Jr., a native of Sutton; and his paternal grandfather was Nathan Andrews, Sr., born in Danvers, Mass., in 1767, a son of Samuel Andrews. He came to Merrimack County when a young man, and in 1795 he married Hannah Gregg and at once settled upon a farm at Fishersfield. His wife was a daughter of James and Janet (Collins) Gregg, and, though lame from childhood, was energetic and industrious, and lived to the age of ninety-four, a very bright and interesting old lady. In 1811 Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Andrews, Sr., built a frame house in Sutton, which with other buildings was burned in 1834. They then built a brick house, which was destroyed by fire on August 28, 1890. Mr. Andrews passed to the higher life September 7, 1853. Mrs. Andrews died April 7, 1866. Their son, Nathan, Jr., was born in Sutton, March 30, 1802, and died March 16, 1883. He married Dolly Sargent Pillsbury, who was born February 16, 1801, and died June 29, 1883. In early years they attended the Congregational church at Bradford Centre, but were later identified with the Baptist church at Bradford Mills Village. Uncle Nathan, as he was called, was a very strict Baptist, very decided in his opinions, and almost Puritanical in his methods of training his family. He was a very well-read man, intelligent and a great student of the Bible as well as of other literature; and his wife,...

Biographical Sketch of Lawrence D. Bailey, Judge

Judge Lawrence D. Bailey, long a resident of Emporia and the pioneer lawyer of Southwestern Kansas, also accomplished much in forwarding the agricultural interests of the state. He was a New Hampshire man, born at Sutton, Merrimack County, August 26, 1819. He was of an old Euglish manufacturing family, and his American ancestors are said to have built the first woolen factory in America at what is now Georgetown, Massachusetts. The judge was educated in Pennsylvania, read law and was admitted to the bar in July, 1846, and after practicing three years in New Hampshire started for California, by way of Cape Horn. After spending four years on the coast, engaged in lumbering, gold digging, practicing law and editorial work, he returned to New Hampshire in the fall of 1853. He then practiced law in his native state until he started for Kansas in the spring of 1857. On the second of April, of that year, Judge Bailey settled on a claim near Clinton, Douglas County, but in the following September opened a law office at Emporia. In 1858 he was elected to the Territorial Legislature; in the following year became associate justice of the Supreme Court of Kansas, under the Wyandotte constitution, and in 1862 was re-elected for six years, under statehood. In 1863 he assisted in organizing the State Board of Agriculture, serving as its president for four successive terms. In the same year he established the Kansas Farmer, and was one of the founders of the State Normal School. The later years of his life he spent in the management of his large agricultural intereats, becoming...

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