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West Virginia Naturalization Records

Naturalization to become a U.S. citizen was a two-part process: the Declaration of Intent to Naturalize, or First Papers, and the Naturalization Record (including the Naturalization Petition), or Final Papers. The First Papers were normally filed five years before the Final Papers because of the five-year residency requirement to become a citizen. No centralized files existed before 1906. In 1906 federal forms replaced the various formats that had been used by the various courts. Copies were sent to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), creating a central file for naturalization papers. The INS is now known as the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). These naturalization records can be found on two different websites, one paid and one free. There is no difference between the indices at either location, it really depends on what software you may be using to record your family tree, as you will want to use Ancestry’s database if you’re using either their online tree or FTM and have a membership. Ancestry – West Virginia, Naturalization Records, 1814-1991 – $$$ Family Search – West Virginia, Naturalization Records, 1814-1991 – Free Barbour County WV Naturalization Law Orders, 1903-1904 Berkeley County WV Declarations of Intention, 1908-1922, v. 1 Declarations of Intention, 1922-1929, v. 2 Declarations of Intention, 1930-1978, v. 3 Naturalization Certificates, 1911-1916 Naturalization Certificates, 1917-1924 Naturalization Certificates, 1924-1929 Naturalization Lists, 1840-1991, v. 1 Naturalization Loose Papers, 1840-1905 Naturalization Petitions, 1930-1946 Naturalization Petitions, 1946-1958 Naturalization Records, 1904-1906, v. 1 Naturalization Records, 1930-1953 Naturalization Records, 1953-1991 Petition Records, 1908-1920, v. 1 Petition Records, 1921-1929, v. 2 Brooke County WV Applications for Oath of Allegiance, 1937 Declarations of Intention,...

Collateral Tribes of the Siouan

Before treating of these better known names, several other tribal names or synonyms, for each of which there is but a single authority, may be mentioned. They were all probably of the same Manahoac or Monacan connection, but it is impossible to identify them positively with any of the tribes mentioned by Smith or with any of those prominent in the later colonial records. This is not necessary, however, as Smith himself, in speaking of the two Virginia confederacies just referred to, distinctly states that each had other tribes besides those which he names, while as for the interior of Carolina, it was entirely unknown excepting along the line of the great trading path until after the Tuskarora war of 1711 and the Yamasi war of 1715 had brought about an upheaval and readjustment of tribal relations by which many of the old names disappeared and new ones took their place. In the meantime the Indian wars of Bacon’s rebellion and the constant inroads of the Iroquois had served further to complicate the problem. The Mahoc Indians Lederer is the sole authority for this tribe. From his narrative it appears that in 1670 they were living on the upper James, with their village at the junction of a stream coming in from the north which he judged to be about 100 miles above the Monacan town. This estimate is too great, but it is probable that they were located about the foothills east of the Blue Ridge. The name suggests the Manahoac, but, as he mentions both Mahoc and Managog in a list of tribes, they may have been...

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