Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Frank Hastings Hamilton

For thirty-three years Frank Hastings Hamilton has been identified with railway service and winning consecutive promotion, has since July, 1896, been secretary and treasurer of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company and its successor company, St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Company, with offices in St. Louis. He was born in New York city, September 5, 1865, and was accorded liberal educational opportunities, completing his studies in the University of France at Paris, where he won his Bachelor of Science degree upon graduation with the class of 1883. Two years later saw the beginning of his identification with railway interests. He was secretary and general agent of the express department of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad at New York city until December 31, 1887, when he became an employe of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad at New York, occupying the position of clerk to the secretary and treasurer in that city from January, 1888, until November, 1890. He was then made chief clerk to the vice president of the same road with headquarters in Boston, where he remained until March, 1893. Until December of the same year he was acting comptroller of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad at Boston and from January until September, 1894, was deputy comptroller at New York, after which he became cashier for the receivers of the same road in that city, thus continuing until December, 1895. At that date he was made treasurer for the receivers of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railway at New York and continued in the position until July, 1896. With the reorganization of the...

Biography of Calvin Perry Bascom

Calvin Perry Bascom, general manager for the business conducted under the name of the Fayette R. Plumb Company, Incorporated, of St. Louis, was born in Ellsworth, Kansas, October 17, 1876. His father, Daniel Craig Bascom, a native of the state of New York, removed to Kansas in 1868 and there engaged in ranching for a number of years, contributing to the early development and progress of that district. He afterward returned to the Empire state, taking up his abode in Rochester, and has now passed away. In early manhood he wedded Agnes Johnson, a native of Vermont, their marriage, however, being celebrated in Ellsworth, Kansas, in 1873. Mrs. Bascom is still living and now makes her home in Rochester, New York. Their family numbers two sons and two daughters. The second eldest of the family is Calvin Perry Bascom, who was educated in the public and high schools of Rochester and also attended the Rochester University and the New York Trade School. He then started with his father in the heating and plumbing business in which he continued for four years, but desirous of improving his education and still further to qualify for the practical and responsible duties of business life he went to Boston where he entered the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was there graduated in 1904 with the degree of Bachelor of Science. He next accepted a position with the Fayette R. Plumb Company, Incorporated, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in October, 1904. He had charge of manufacturing there for six years and on the expiration of that period came to St. Louis in 1910. Here he designed...

Fort Independence

That Bostonians are thankful people truly appreciating their public blessings is amply proved by the way in which they turn out to Fort Independence, Castle Island, now a part of the Marine Park of their city, for the fresh air and unexciting recreation it offers. Other citizens of other cities create parks from their historic places and, then, content to know that they have them when they want them, allot the day and night watchmen entire seclusion in these domains. With Bostonians it is different: On any bright and cheering day throngs can be found at the old fort, of various classes and of widely sundered poles of thought; but joined together in one great common heritage, a capacity for making use of that which they have and of taking their pleasure in a devout and noiseless manner not to be seen amongst the habitants of any other great American city. It is a pleasant place, Castle Island, and the air there on a sunny day sweeping in from the great reaches of Boston’s environing waters is a true elixir. The views in various directions are entrancing, showing, in one direction, wide expanses of blue with dim islands in the distance and cottony clouds overhead; in another, the shipping and sky line of Boston harbor and the jumbled city. Geographically stated, Castle Island is a body of hard, rocky land, most of which is occupied by the historic old fort, and it is situated three miles from the head of Boston Harbor and two hundred yards from City Point, South Boston, to which it is connected by a wooden...

Biographical Sketch of Abbot, Francis Ellingwood

Abbot, Francis Ellingwood, son of Joseph Hale and Fanny (Larcom) Abbot, was born in Boston, November 6, 1836. His early education was obtained at home, and in the Boston public Latin school. Fitting for college, he entered Harvard in 1855, and was graduated with the class of 1859. He spent three years in the Harvard divinity school and Meadville (Pa.) Theological Seminary. It is a fitting tribute to the mother of the subject of this sketch that he has filially attributed his best education to her early training and blessed influence. Mr. Abbot was principal of the Meadville (Pa.) Female Seminary three years ending in June, 1863, while still studying for his profession. He was ordained minister of the Unitarian society in Dover, N. H., August 31, 1864, and resigned April 1, 1868, to become minister of the Independent religious society in the same city. He resigned this position at the end of six months, because, in consequence of a famous lawsuit (set forth at great length in the New Hampshire Reports, Vol. 53), the new society voted not to maintain its own independent position. He served as minister of the Independent society of Toledo, Ohio, from July 1869 to March 1873, and editor of the Toledo (afterward Boston) “Index” from January 1, 1870, to July 1, 1880. He kept a classical school for boys in New York until September 1881, and has had since that time a “Home for Boys” in Cambridge, fitting pupils for Harvard College by private instruction. Mr. Abbot was married in Nashua, N. H., August 3, 1859, to Katharine Fearing, the daughter of David...

Biographical Sketch of Agassiz, Alexander

Agassiz, Alexander, son of Louis and Cecile (Braun) Agassiz, was born in Neufchatel, Switzerland, December 17, 1835. His early educational training was received in the gymnasium of his native place. He came to this country in 1849, after his father, the celebrated naturalist, and entering Harvard College, was graduated there from in the class of 1855. He inherited the tastes of his father, and pursued his studies in the Lawrence scientific school (Harvard) during the years 1857 to ’61 inclusive. In 1859 he was engaged with the United States Coast Survey: in 1861 he was made assistant in the Zoological Museum, Cambridge, and became director of this institution in 1874. He was superintendent of the Calumet and Hecla Mining Company, 1866 to 1869. He was treasurer till 1871, when he was made its president, which position he still holds. Professor Agassiz was married at Jamaica Plain, November 13, 1860, to Anna, daughter of George Robert and Sarah P. (Shaw) Russell. Of this union were three children: George R., Maximilian and Rudolph L. Agassiz. Professor Agassiz has been overseer of Harvard College, and is now fellow of this...

Biographical Sketch of Allen, Charles H.

Allen, Charles H., son of Zenas and Caroline (Randall) Allen, was born in Boston, June 14, 1828. He received his early educational training in the public schools of Boston. He began his business life as youngest boy in a dry goods jobbing store. Subsequently he became bookkeeper fro Francis Skinner & Co., commission merchants engaged in selling cotton and wollen fabrics for manufacturers; afterward a member of the firm of Leland, Allen & Bates in the same business. He is now president of the Central National Bank of Boston, also of the Home Savings Bank. Mr. Allen was married in New Ipswich, N. H., July 2, 1849, to Caroline F., daughter of George and Caroline (Muzzey) Sanders. Of this union are two children; Charles F. and Francis S. Allen. Mr. Allen was a member of the Mercantile Library Association and a member of its government from 1846 to 1853, being elected its president in 1851; member of the common council of Boston 1867-’68, the last year acting as its president; member of the Cochituate water board of Boston 1869 to 1872, serving as president of the board 1871 and ’72; member of the House of Representatives 1878 and ’80; member of the state Senate 1881 to ’82; member of the board of aldermen of Boston 1885-’88; elected as chairman of the board in 1886 and again in 1888. From 1855 to 1860 Mr. Allen was an active member and lieutenant of the famous Boston Light Infantry. Mr. Allen has filled a well-rounded career of official life, and has honorably earned the respite he now claims from such responsibilities. In...

Biographical Sketch of Allen, Stillman Boyd

Allen, Stillman Boyd, son of Horace O. and Elizabeth Allen, was born September 8, 1830, at Waterborough, New county, Maine. He received his education in the academies at North Yarmouth, Kennebunk and Alfred, Maine. In September 1853, he was admitted to the bar, and practiced law in Maine until May, 1861, when he removed to Boston, and two years later became associated with the Hon. John D. Long, who subsequently retired from the firm upon his election as governor of the State. He is now the senior member of the law fir of Allen, Long & Hemenway (Governor Long since his retirement from congressional life having resumed his former relations). Mr. Allen has been largely engaged in jury trials, and has the reputation of winning for his clients the largest verdicts against railroads and other corporations ever rendered in this country. Mr. Allen was married at Kittery, Maine, September 7, 1854, to Harriet S., daughter of Joseph and Mary Seaward. Their children are: Willis Boyd Allen, who was a partner in his father’s firm for six years and has since been engaged in literary pursuits, and Marion Boyd Allen. In 1876-’77 Mr. Allen represented the city of Boston in the House of Representatives, serving the first year upon the judiciary committee. The following year he was chairman of the committee on probate and chancery. In 1877 he conducted an examination, made by the Legislature in to alleged abuses existing in the state reform school, which resulted in an entire change in the management of that institution. For three years Mr. Allen was president of the Mercantile Library Association of...

Biography of Adams, William T.

Adams, William T., son of Laban and Catharine (Johnson) Adams, was born in Medway, Norfolk County, July 30, 1822. He was educated in the public and private schools of Boston and vicinity, and when a mere lad displayed a talent for writing, his first article being published in the “Social Monitor.” For three years Mr. Adams was the master of the “Lower Road” school in Dorchester. In 1846 he resigned his position to assist his father and brother in the management of the Adams House, Boston. Mr. Adams resumed teaching in 1848, in the Boylston school, Boston, becoming the master in 1860, and on the establishment of the Bowditch school, he was transferred and held the post of master of that school till he resigned in 1865. He then went abroad and traveled throughout Europe, dating his career as an author from this period. Mr. Adams’s nom de plume, “Oliver Optic,” originated from his having written a poem in 1851 which was published under the heading of “A Poem delivered before the Mutual Admiration Society, by Oliver Optic, M. D.” The name “Optic” was suggested by a character in a drama at the Boston Museum, called “Dr. Optic.” To this Mr. Adams prefixed “Oliver,” with no thought of ever using it again. But soon after two essays appeared in the “Waverley Magazine,” by “Oliver Optic,” which were so well received that he continued to write under this pseudonym until it became impracticable to abandon it. His books, numbering over a hundred volumes, are widely and deservedly known. Mr. Adams was married October 7, 1846, to Sarah, daughter of Edward...

Biographical Sketch of Allen, Charles

Allen, Charles, son of Sylvester and Harriet (Ripley) Allen, was born in Greenfield, Franklin county, April 17, 1827. He was graduated from Harvard in the class of 1847. He was admitted to the bar in 1850. He practiced law in Greenfield until 1862, and then moved to Boston. He was appointed by Governor John D. Long justice of the supreme judicial court, which position he now holds. Judge Allen was reporter of decisions of the supreme judicial court from 1861 to 1867. He was attorney general of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 1867 to 1872. In 1880 he was appointed one of the commissioner to revise the general statutes. Judge Allen was never...

Biographical Sketch of Adams, John Gregory, Bishop

Adams, John Gregory Bishop, son of Isaac and Margaret Adams, was born in Groveland, Essex County, October 6, 1841. He obtained a common school education, and spent the greater part of his boyhood and youth in that locality. In the early summer of 1861 he enlisted in Major Ben; Perley Poore’s rifle battalion, which later became the nucleus of the 19th Massachusetts regiment. He served through the war, rising to the rank of captain. He participated in every march, and was engaged in every battle of the army of the Potomac in which his regiment took part. At Fredericksburg he saved the colors of his regiment from capture, after eight color bearers had been killed. He was twice severely wounded in the second day’s fight at Gettysburg, and while in the advanced lines before Petersburg, on the 22d of June 1864, he was captured with his regiment, and for nine months suffered the miseries of a southern prison pen. After the war he was for some years foreman in the factory of B. F. Doak & Co., but on account of failing health resigned that position to enter the inspector’s office in the Boston Custom House. He remained there fifteen months, when he was appointed postmaster at Lynn, which office he held eight years. On the establishment of the reformatory prison at Concord, he was appointed deputy superintendent, and in 1885 was made sergeant-at-arms for the Commonwealth, which important position he now holds. Captain Adams was the first recruit mustered into Post 5, G. A. R. He was three times chosen commander, and was one year department commander of...
Page 7 of 23« First...3456789101112...20...Last »

Pin It on Pinterest