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Biography of Augustus Barnard

Augustus Barnard, formerly of Hopkinton, was one of the brave men who fought for the Union in the Civil War. Born in Haverhill, Mass., he was reared and educated in New York State. After spending a part of his early life in Boston, he came to Hopkinton, where he learned the currier’s trade of Jonathan Osgood. He followed this trade in connection with tanning until the late war was well in progress. Then he enlisted as a private in the Sixteenth New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry for nine months. With his regiment he served his full time, the most of which was spent in Louisiana. The exposure and hardships of the camp and field had undermined his health to such an extent that he lived but three months after his discharge. He died December 16, 1863, at the age of thirty-one, in the house on Putney Hill now occupied by his widow, Mrs. Julia A. Barnard. Mrs. Julia A. Barnard was born May 19, 1823, at Contoocook, this county, daughter of Ichabod and Rebecca (Hazelton) Eaton. Both her parents were born in Haverhill, Mass., where they lived until after their marriage. Mr. Eaton was a mason by trade. In 1822, about a year before the birth of Mrs. Barnard, he came with his family to Hopkinton, locating on Putney Hill, in a house which is still owned by the Eaton family. Here the parents spent their remaining days, the father dying at the age of fourscore years, and the mother when seventy-five years old. They Mrs. Barnard, the youngest, is the only survivor. The others were: Susan, who married Ephraim...

Biography of Joseph Wilkins

Joseph Wilkins, a resident of Pembroke and a veteran of the Civil War, was born May 24, 1844, son of Jeremiah Hall and Mary (Thompson) Wilkins. He is not only a representative of an old New Hampshire family, but a lineal descendant of ancestors who were first settlers in this country. Bray Wilkins, who came from Wales, Brecknock County, was a descendant of Lord John Wilkins, who belonged to a family that traced their lineage back to 1090 and had borne many honorable titles. Lord John was a connection of the Bishop Wilkins who married the sister of the Protector, Oliver Cromwell. Bray, at the age of twenty, is supposed to have come to this country in the same ship with Endicott, about 1630, and to have first settled in Dorchester, Mass. Before 1659 he bought from Governor Richard Bellingham seven hundred acres of land called Wills Hill, which in 1661 was within Salem’s six-mile limit. He died in 1702, a patriarchal land owner, amidst the farms and homes of his sons and daughters. The portion of Bray’s son, John Wilkins, was situated in Danvers, Mass. John, son of John, who was born about 1689, went with his wife, Mary Goodale Wilkins, and two sons to Marlboro, Mass., in 1740. His eldest son, Josiah Wilkins, married Lois Bush, whose grandparents settled in Marlboro in 1690. Of Josiah’s five sons, the third, Jonathan, born in 1755, graduated at Harvard College, studied theology, and was called to preach at the old South Parish, Concord, N.H., in 1789. He married Sarah Hall, whose grandfather, Deacon Joseph Hall, was one of Concord’s first...

Biography of William P. Wood

William P. Wood, a farmer of Plainfield, was born here, December 29, 1859, son of Alban Palmer and Rhoda (Eaton) Wood, of this town. His grandfather, John Wood was the first male child born in Lebanon, N.H. John was one of the foremost and wealthiest farmers in the district and a very religious man. He married Persis Hyde, of Lebanon, who bore him eleven children; namely, Persis, John, Jr., Lucinda, Jemima, Sally, Thomas, Annie, Harriet, Martha, Palmer, and one child who died in infancy. Persis, who was born in 1797, and did not marry, died at the age of fifty. John Wood, Jr., born in 1799, who became a very prosperous farmer and a prominent man in Lebanon, served in all the town offices, and was a Representative to the General Court. He married Sylvia Whittaker, and had two sons-John and Joseph. Lucinda, born in 1801, married Samuel Wood, of Lebanon, a wealthy farmer and real estate owner, and had two children-Hannah and Clara. Jemima, born in 1803, married Isaac Leighton, a farmer of Hartford, Vt. Sally, born in 1805, became Mrs. Silas Waterman, of Lebanon. Thomas, born in 1810, who became a wealthy farmer and speculator of Lebanon, married Joanna Davis, and had two daughters. Annie, born in 1812, died at the age of six. Harriet, born in 1814, married Allen H. Weld, of Lebanon, who was first a professor in a seminary of that town, and later a farmer and the Superintendent of Schools for the county of St. Croix, Wisconsin. Their son, Allen Palmer Weld, became a lawyer in River Falls, Wis., and is now Judge...

Biography of George H. Adams

George H. Adams, of Hill, the senior proprietor of the Hill Needle Factory, was born at Haverhill, Mass., son of the late Harrison Adams, the founder of the needle industry in this place. The first of the Adams family in this country was Enoch Adams, the great-grandfather of George H. He came to America from England, and settled, first in Newbury, and afterward in Salisbury, N.H. His last years were spent in the western part of the latter town, near Kearsarge Mountain. His son, Russel, after his marriage with Susanna Fifield, moved to Hill, where a family of eight children were born to him. Of these the only survivor is Enoch, who resides in Belmont, N.H. In early life Harrison Adams was a shoemaker and worked in Massachusetts. Subsequently on account of failing health he returned to Hill and carried on a farm here for about fifteen years. He moved into the village proper in 1866, after which he had no regular occupation for several years. He then started the needle business with his sons and others, and afterward retained an interest in the concern until his death at the age of seventy-five years. He was the second Republican to represent this town in the State legislature, and he served in the capacity of Selectman and in other town offices. A devoted member of the Congregational church, at the time of his death he had been senior Deacon, for some time. His wife, in maidenhood Margaret Morse, was the mother of George H. and Charles F. Adams. George H. Adams, the elder son of Harrison Adams, has always been...

Biography of William Gregg Andrews

William Gregg Andrews, a prosperous farmer of Sutton, Merrimack County, N.H., was born July 7, 1834, on the farm upon which he now lives. His father was Nathan Andrews, Jr., a native of Sutton; and his paternal grandfather was Nathan Andrews, Sr., born in Danvers, Mass., in 1767, a son of Samuel Andrews. He came to Merrimack County when a young man, and in 1795 he married Hannah Gregg and at once settled upon a farm at Fishersfield. His wife was a daughter of James and Janet (Collins) Gregg, and, though lame from childhood, was energetic and industrious, and lived to the age of ninety-four, a very bright and interesting old lady. In 1811 Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Andrews, Sr., built a frame house in Sutton, which with other buildings was burned in 1834. They then built a brick house, which was destroyed by fire on August 28, 1890. Mr. Andrews passed to the higher life September 7, 1853. Mrs. Andrews died April 7, 1866. Their son, Nathan, Jr., was born in Sutton, March 30, 1802, and died March 16, 1883. He married Dolly Sargent Pillsbury, who was born February 16, 1801, and died June 29, 1883. In early years they attended the Congregational church at Bradford Centre, but were later identified with the Baptist church at Bradford Mills Village. Uncle Nathan, as he was called, was a very strict Baptist, very decided in his opinions, and almost Puritanical in his methods of training his family. He was a very well-read man, intelligent and a great student of the Bible as well as of other literature; and his wife,...

Biography of George Whitefield Abbott

George Whitefield Abbott, of Penacook, President of the J. E. Symonds Table Company, cabinetmakers, was born in West Boscawen, now Webster, N.H., on March 13, 1837. His parents were Nathaniel and Mary (Fitts) Abbott, the former a resident of West Boscawen and the latter of Sandown, N.H. George W. Abbott in his youth, after attending the public schools of Warner, completed his education at a private academy in West Salisbury, N.H. He went immediately to Boston, Mass., where he was employed as a clerk until 1861, when he came to Penacook, N.H., to engage in the grocery business with his brother, under the firm name of H. & G. W. Abbott. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Seventh New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry, going directly to St. Augustine, Fla., remaining until May, 1863. From that city he went to Morris Island, South Carolina, being engaged all summer at Forts Wagner, Gregg, and Sumter. He then went to St. Helena, S.C.; and in February, 1864, General Truman Seymour, the objective point of which was Lake City, Fla. Severely wounded at the battle of Olustee, Fla., on February 20, he was obliged to stay in the hospital until April, 1865, shortly before the close of the war. Later he was returned to his regiment, and mustered out at Goldsboro, N.C., in June, 1865. Mr. Abbott then returned to Penacook, and engaged in mercantile pursuits until 1882, when he formed a copartnership with Mr. J. E. Symonds, for the manufacture of furniture, making a specialty of tables, desks, etc., their plant being one of the largest of the kind in New...

Biography of Josiah C. Trask

Josiah C. Trask was one of the 180 victims of the terrible Quantrill raid and massacre at Lawrence, on August 21, 1863. He was a young and brilliant editor at the time of his death and few men of Kansas were more beloved. His father was a minister, who preached in Massachnsetts for many years, and he himself was born at Warren, that state, May 9, 1837. He pursued an academic course at Fitchburg, and when sixteen years of age went to Boston, where he was employed as a printer in various newspaper offices. Through his father-in-law, Joel B. Hibbard, one of the founders of Cortland (New York) Academy, Mr. Trask imbibed strong anti-slavery convictions, and in February, 1857, in company with his brother, left New York for the Territory of Kansas. He first secured employment in the office of the Herald of Freedom, Lawrence, and in 1861, with Hovey E. Lowman, bought the paper and changed its name to the Kansas State Journal. Soon afterward he edited a paper at Topeka and published one at Yankton, Dakota. In the fall of 1862 he returned to New York, married and settled at Lawrence. In the following year, besides editing the Journal, he went as a delegate to the canal convention held in Chieago, and in the following July spent the Fourth, with his young bride, at Junction City. Arrangements had been completed for adding a daily issue to the Journal and the press arrived only a few days before his death. For several years he had done a large portion of the printing of the laws of Kansas, was...

Biography of John G. Haskell

John G. Haskell, who made a reputation both as a soldier and an architect, was born in Chittenden County, Vermont, February 5, 1832, and was educated at Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham, Massachusetts, and Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. In 1855 he entered an architect’s office in Boston, and two years later settled at Lawrence, Kansas. During the Civil war Captain Haskell served as assistant quartermaster general of Kansas, as quartermaster of the Third Kansas and the Tenth Kansas Volunteers, as captain and assistant quartermaster on the staff of Gen. James G. Blunt, and chief quartermaster of the Army of the Frontier. In 1866 he was made architect of the state house, building the east wing, and as state architect subsequently constructed much of the capitol; also the State University, Snow Hall, the insane asylums at Topeka and Osawatomie, the reform school at Topeka and the reformatory, were all designed and largely built by...

Will of James Naybor – 1671

JAMES NAYBOR, Huntington, “Cooper.” Leaves to youngest daughter, Martha, “my Great Trunk and best chest with linnen and woolen clothes.” “To my grandchild, Mercy, when 21, £10, to be raised out of my house in Boston,” which I leave to my five daughters, Mary, Sarah, Elizabeth, Rachel, and Martha. Makes his daughter Martha executrix, and Mr. Wm. Bartholemew and Goodman Sundall, both of Boston, executors in trust. “I desire Thomas Scudder and Joseph Bayley, of Hunttington, to be helpfull to my daughter Martha as executor.” Dated January 27, 1671. Witnesses, Matthew Owen, Peter Floyd, Joseph Bayley. Proved at Court of Sessions, Southampton, and confirmed March 19, 1671. LIBER 1-2, page...

Charlestown Mass. Bells

Thomas Bell, merchant, from London , England , lived on the Town Hill in 1655. Abraham Bell, waterman, was in New Haven in 1643 and came to Charlestown in 1647. It appears by the town records that he was “cast away 31 Dec., found 4th [Jan.], buried 7th [1662-3].” His children were: Hannah; Mary; Abraham, died January 16, 1656-7 ; Abraham, born November 17, 1657 ; Dorothy; Isaac, born October 10, 1661 , or 1662. John Bell, taxed, 1736 and 1738. Thomas Bell, in court, 1743; estate taxed 1744. Samuel Bell of Boston and Salem , married Sarah Calder, February 5, 1746-7 . John Bell of Bellerica, married Sarah Foster, also of Bellerica, December 12, 1774...
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