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Taylor, William J. – Obituary

William J. Taylor, one of the most picturesque and best known of the early residents of the Kittitas Valley, passed away at 6 o’clock last evening [May 1, 1924] at his home in East Eleventh Street, of stomach and kidney trouble. He had been ill for several months, his second illness in the 71 years of his unusually active life. Mr. Taylor, not at home out of the saddle, had ridden range in the valley almost continuously from the time he first came here in 1870 until a few months ago. “Bill,” as he was known to all his many friends, rode a horse to the valley in 1870 from Seattle, leading a pack horse. Born at Sublimity, Marion County, Oregon, September 28, 1852, the son of Melville and Cyrena Taylor, who crossed the plains in 1847, Mr. Taylor when 14 set out for himself and landed first in Seattle when there were but two houses there. He was only 17 when he came to Kittitas Valley with $20 in his pocket. He first worked for Walter A. Bull on the latter’s ranch south of Ellensburg, when the coyotes were so numerous they were a nuisance around the house. Next he worked for six years for George S. Smith, riding range, and rode range for Phelps and Wadleigh in the Okanogan Country, when the three were the only white persons in that section of the state. Later he took up a homestead on what later was known as the Smith ranch, but disposed of that. He bought what is now the McKenzie place on the Nanum, and resided there...

Abrams, Hazel Branch Vogel Mrs. – Obituary

Hazel Branch Vogel Abrams, 85, beloved mom and grandma, died Dec. 21, 2004, in the comfort of her home and wrapped in the love of her family. Her funeral will be Monday at 11 a.m. at the First Baptist Church in Cambridge, Idaho. Burial will follow at Cambridge Cemetery. Arrangements are under the direction of Thomason Funeral Home in Weiser, Idaho. Hazel was born July 28, 1919, at Sublimity, Ore., the fifth of six children of Burton S. and Etta Mae Potter Branch. She was raised on their homestead in the Crane Creek area east of Midvale, Idaho, and she had wonderful childhood memories of riding horses, helping her dad with the farming, learning to cook on a wood stove, attending one-room schools, and being surrounded by a large extended family of aunts, uncles and cousins. After finishing eighth grade, Hazel rode her horse into Midvale where she boarded with families so she could attend high school. She was the first in her family to receive a high school education, graduating from Midvale High School in 1936. Soon after that a handsome dark-haired stranger named Bert Vogel swept her off her feet. The two of them were married Aug. 25, 1937, and their love and friendship endured for better or worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health for 38 years until Bert’s untimely death in 1975 at age 64. Most of their 38 years together was spent on their farm five miles southeast of Cambridge, where they worked side by side farming and ranching, milking cows, and raising a family. Hazel always raised a huge garden...

Biographical Sketch of James P. Atwood, M.D.

JAMES P. ATWOOD, M.D. – One of the most successful physicians of Baker City, Oregon, is the gentleman whose name appears as the heading of this sketch. A careful and conscientious gentleman of temperate habits, and thoroughly reliable in all public and professional as well as private matters, he enjoys the confidence of the public, and has a large practice. He was born in Wisconsin in 1846, but was educated in Oregon, at Sublimity and at Corvallis, and took his degree in medicine from the medical department of the Willamette University at Salem, and from the medical department of the Willamette University at Salem, and from the medical department of the Columbia College, New York. His father, A.F. Atwood, a pioneer of 1853, lived on his farm four miles from Corvallis until 1868, when he removed to Walla Walla county, Washington Territory where he died March 24, 1889. Dr. Atwood’s first field was at La Grande; but in 1871 he removed to his present location, where he has since been actively employed. Baker City was then but a village of some seven hundred inhabitants, although money was then in abundant circulation. Mining interests still dominate, and will always be pre-eminent. The surrounding region is remarkably healthy, phthisic being almost unknown. The Doctor was married in 1882 to Miss Florence Thompson of San Francisco, California, and has one child...

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