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Biography of Edward A. Blades

EDWARD A. BLADES. The farming class of America is notable for the degree of intelligence that is possessed among its representatives. Our subject belongs to one of the most progressive of families, and is proud of the fact that his father was one of those fast disappearing landmarks of a heroic past-an early pioneer. Mr. Blades was born in Monroe County, East Tennessee. In 1830, but his parents, Edward and Ellen (Maner) Blades, were natives of North Carolina, where they grew to mature years and united their fortunes. From there they removed to Tennessee, and about 1836 came by ox-team to Greene County, Missouri, being about two months on the road. They located in the woods on the Pickerel, and there was but one house within a distance of five miles. Mr. Blades spent the rest of his life there engaged in cultivating the soil, and died about 1847. He was a great hunter and sportsman, etc., and a man well and favorably known for miles around. He was one of the pioneers of Greene County, settling there when Springfield was but a mere hamlet of log houses, and he contributed his full share toward the improvement and development of the county. He was of English origin. His wife died in Greene County in 1855. They were the parents of an old-fashioned family of fourteen children, as follows: Sally Ann, deceased; R. D., of Billings; Nancy, deceased; Isaac T., Cynthia, Edward A., Rebecca L., William, Elizabeth, James R., Frances, George Washington, and two died young. Our subject was reared amid the rude surroundings of pioneer life, and to obtain...

Biography of Maj. Charles Galloway

In the veins of the gentleman whose name heads this sketch flows sterling Scotch blood, for his paternal grandfather, James Galloway, was born in the land of ” thistles and oatmeal,” of Scotch parents. He immigrated to this country from the land of his birth in early manhood and later settled in the district known as the old Crab Orchard, Kentucky He was the founder of the family in this country, and eventually passed from life in Knox County, Tennessee He was one of the pioneers of that State, was active in its development, and took part in a number of engagements with the Indians, when his home and that of his neighbors was threatened. Politically he is a Democrat. He reared a family of four sons and five daughters, Jesse Galloway, the father of the subject of this sketch, being one of the former and a native of the “dark and bloody ground.” He was taken to Tennessee when quite small, and after residing there until about sixty years of age he removed to Indiana, and in 1839 became a resident of Barry County, Missouri, of which place he was a resident until his death ten years later. Like his father before him he was a Democrat, and also like him he was active in assisting in the settlement of his section, which at that time was in a very wild state,’ inhabited by plenty of wild game of various kinds. He took part in the Creek, Seminole and Cherokee Indian Wars, and was also a participant in the War of 1812. He was married in Tennessee to...

Biography of Thomas C. Wade

THOMAS C. WADE. This wide-awake, energetic and capable county official is a native of Lawrence County, Missouri, where he was born September 26, 1853, his parents, Joseph and Nancy (Sivley) Wade, having been born in Kentucky March 4, 1814, and Lawrence County, Ala., April 11, 1816, respectively. The paternal grandfather, William Wade, was also a Kentuckian. He was a soldier of the Revolution, and was also with Gen. Jackson at New Orleans. He was an early emigrant to Texas, where he died soon after the close of the Civil War. The early days of Joseph Wade were spent in his native State, but he was married and lived in Alabama for a few years. In 1852 he removed to Missouri and settled in Lawrence County; thence to Carroll County, Arkansas, and a few years later took up his residence in Webster County, Missouri, finally settling in Greene County, fourteen miles west of Springfield, on Grand Prairie. His last move was to Christian County, where he died January 19, 1888. He made farming his life occupation, at which he secured a competency, for he was industrious and thrifty in all his ways, and he became well known and highly respected throughout southwest Missouri. Politically he was a Republican, socially a member of the A. F. & A. M., and in religion was a Methodist, of which church he was long a member. Mrs. Wade was a daughter of one of the early pioneers of Alabama, and was called from life on the 26th of March, 1883, at which time she was an earnest and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal...

Biography of John D. Graves

JOHN D. GRAVES. Mr. Graves is accounted a prosperous farmer and stock-man of Stone County, Missouri, and like the majority of native Missourians he is progressive in his views and of an energetic temperament. He was born in Livingston County August 28, 1847, to the union of James C. and Lititia (Webber) Graves, the former a native of Virginia, born March 15, 1803, and the latter of Boone County, Kentucky, born October 10, 1808. The Graves family came originally from England and settled in the Old Dominion at a period antedating the Revolution. Joseph Graves, our subject’s grandfather, was born in Virginia, but at an early date moved to Kentucky with his family, and passed the remainder of his days in Boone County. In that county James C. Graves, father of subject, grew to mature years and married. In 1831 he came to Livingston County when it was a wilderness, and was one of the first settlers of the State. He became prominent in county affairs, and was sheriff of the same for some time. He also held the office of justice of the peace for twenty years, and was an upright, law-abiding citizen. He was a Democrat in politics and a man strong in his convictions. Mrs. Graves’ father, Phillip Webber, was a native of Wales, and came to the United States when a mere boy. During the Revolutionary War he served as captain in the Light Horse Cavalry from Virginia. At an early date he settled in Kentucky, was a pioneer there, and there passed the closing scenes of his life, dying when quite an aged man....

Biography of William Brown

WILLIAM BROWN. Christian County has long had the reputation of being one of the best farming and stockraising counties in the State. Not only do the farmers here give much attention to these industries, but they are generally men of enterprise and information who are well posted on all the current topics of the day. Prominent among those who have done their full share in advancing every interest of the county is William Brown, who was born in Wilkes County, N. C., April 27, 1845, and is the youngest of four children born to Rufus B. and Ruth (Barnes) Brown. The other children were named as follows: Sarah, single, died in Stone County; Nancy is the wife of William Pope, of Stone County, and Elias died in Arkansas when young. The early days of our subject were passed on a farm with limited educational advantages, and from the age of eight years he was reared in southwestern Missouri whither he had come with his parents. For a time he served in the Seventy-second Missouri State Militia, and was in a fight at Hemphill Barrens, in Stone County. About 1868 he was married to Miss Eliza White, a daughter of Jonathan White, an old resident and prominent farmer of Stone County. Mrs. Brown was born in Tennessee, and died May 7, 1892. Eight children were the fruits of this union: Lizzie, deceased, was the wife of Sherman Vance; Robert, Peter, Lydia, Henry, George, Carrie and Emma. For two years after his marriage our subject resided on his father’s farm in Stone County, and then located on his present farm one...

Biography of J. M. Gideon, M. D.

J. M. GIDEON, M. D. There is generally a wide diversity of opinion among people outside of the medical profession in their estimate of the skill and ability of a particular physician. A family is likely to pin its faith on one practitioner and distrust all the rest. If there is a member of the profession in Ozark who has successfully fought down this prejudice and now stands secure in the confidence and high esteem of the general public, that man is Dr. J. M. Gideon, a man whose research in the field of science has produced such remarkable results as to leave no question of his intellectual greatness. The Doctor was born on the old home of the family near Ozark, in Christian County, December 11, 1855, and until fourteen years of age he spent his life on the farm. He then went to the Hoosier State and attended school in Howard County for a year or so, after which he returned to Christian County and again entered the schoolroom. When eighteen years of age he began the study of medicine under Dr. Parker, of Ozark, and remained in his office for about a year. After that he began practicing at Kirbyville, Taney County, remained there one year and then went to Galena, the county seat of Stone County, where he practiced his profession for two years. Later he moved to Highlandville, Christian County, and for twelve years was in active practice there, but during that time he located in Clinton County, Indiana, where he practiced for a short time. In the year 1893 he came to Ozark...

Biography of George B. Shepherd

GEORGE B. SHEPHERD. This gentleman is one of the prosperous farmers and successful merchants of Stone County, Missouri, and has resided here since 1871, coming thither from the vicinity of Terre Haute, Indiana He was born in Floyd County, Kentucky, August 31, 1832, and was a son of David and Lucretia (Hale) Shepherd, both of whom were natives of Lee County, Virginia They were among the early pioneers of the Blue Grass State, and made their settlement at the head of Licking River where they improved a farm, and where the father also followed the-calling of a stone mason and did considerable contracting in this line in Louisville and other large cities of Kentucky. He died in that State when nearly one hundred years old, having been a Henry Clay Whig throughout life. He became possessed of a considerable amount of worldly goods and was the owner of a good farm and mill, which at the time of his death came into the possession of his children, who are named as follows: Abram, John, Benjamin, Dicey, Elizabeth, Bryce H., Jacob, David, George B. and Polly. John, Bryce H., George B. and Polly are the surviving members of this family. After the death of their mother the father took a second wife and by her had two children who are now living on the old homestead in Kentucky. The parents were members of the Christian Church and were highly esteemed in the section in which they resided. The paternal grand-father, Jonathan Shepherd, has a brother William, who was a colonel in the Revolutionary War, and was a participant in the...
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