Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Washington M. Wade

WASHINGTON M. WADE. Washington M. Wade, ex-clerk and recorder of Christian County, and a prominent banker of the county, was born in Carroll County, Arkansas, January 21, 1858, and was the youngest of ten children born to the union of Joseph and Nancy (Sivley) Wade. The father was born in Warren County, Kentucky, near Bowling Green, March 4, 1814, and the mother was born in Lawrence County, Ala., in 1816. The latter was the daughter of Mr. and Rachel Sivley, and was the only one of the family to come to Missouri. Our subject’s paternal grandparents were Joseph Wade and his wife, formerly Miss Mounts. The father of our subject came from Alabama to Greene County, Missouri, in 1840, but subsequently moved to Arkansas, where he made his home until 1861. He then moved to Rolla, Missouri, for being a strong Union man his ideas did not accord with his neighbors’, and he thought it prudent to leave. He enlisted in the army, but was rejected on account of his age. His wife took the family and located in the northeast part of Christian County, but after residing there one year, moved to Grand Prairie, in Greene County, north of Republic. In 1866 the family moved to the southwest point of Christian County, Galloway Township, near Highlandville, and there resided until the death of the father, on the 29th of January, 1888. The mother died on the 8th of March, 1883. They came from Alabama to Missouri by wagon, and the father entered land in Galloway Township. Mr. Wade was at one time a Whig, but later, or in...

Biography of Hon. James D. Gideon

HON. JAMES D. GIDEON. No better citizens have come to Christian County, Missouri, than those who crossed the Mississippi River from Tennessee, and who brought as their inheritance the traits of character and life which has ever distinguished them. Hon. James D. Gideon, who is one of the foremost farmers and stockraisers of Union Township, Stone County, first saw the light in Hawkins County, Tennessee, in 1833. His parents, John and Polly (Evans) Gideon, were also natives of that State, the father born in Hawkins and the mother in Jefferson County. Both were fairly well educated for those days, and made their home in Tennessee until 1843, when they removed to Lincoln County, Kentucky Six years later, or in 1849, Mr. Gideon came on foot to what is now Christian County, and being a clock tinker he made the trip to work at his trade. He remained in this State until 1853, having in the meantime taken up a claim in what is now the southeastern part of Christian County (then Taney County), and then returned to Kentucky to get his family. He then settled on his claim, improved a good farm, but during the war he sold this and moved to Greene County. After the war, in 1866, he returned to this county and located on Bear Creek, where his death occurred in 1870, when sixty-six years of age. For many years he was a Baptist in his religions views. In connection with his trade he also carried on farming, and was fairly successful. A Democrat in early life, he later advocated the principles of the Republican party,...

Biography of Hon. Alfred Peters

HON. ALFRED PETERS. A traveler journeying through Pierce Township about a mile and a quarter southwest of Crane postoffice, will see the attractive home and beautifully cultivated farm of our subject, which evidently shows the hand of a practiced and systematic farmer. Mr. Peters was born in western Virginia in 1826, and is a son of Jacob and Keziah (Gardner) Peters, also natives of the grand old Mother of States. Mrs. Peters died there in 1828, and after the father’s second marriage, he moved to Clay County, Ky, where he remained three years. Returning to Virginia, he passed the remainder of his days, dying when our subject was but a boy. He was a farmer, and although uneducated, was an honest, industrious citizen and a man with a host of warm friends. The grandfather, John Peters, was a Pennsylvania Duchman, but an early settler of western Virginia, where he lived for some time in a fort, and where he spent his days engaged in farming, until his death about 1847. Grandfather Gardner died in Virginia. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs, Peters, as follows: Nancy died in Baton Rouge, La.; William is a farmer in Virginia; Alfred our subject; and Matilda, who died in Arkansas. By his second marriage, Jacob Peters became the father of four children: Mathias and Isaac, twins, and Susan and Jacob both of whom died young. Mathias and Isaac both died young, the former before the war and the latter in the hospital at St. Louis during the war. Our subject’s early life was not very different from that of any boy reared...

Biography of Hon. John H. Anderson

HON. JOHN H. ANDERSON. This part of Missouri has proved a mine of wealth to thousands of industrious and earnest farmers who have come hither from the East and by dint of hard work and enterprise have developed the resources which nature so liberally provided. Among these is John H. Anderson, who was born in North Carolina, in 1826, to the marriage of William and Jane (Scruggs) Anderson, natives of the Palmetto State, where they were reared and married. Later the parents moved to the Old North State and from there to Georgia, where they remained a few years. When our subject was five or six years of age the parents came by team to what is now Moniteau County, Missouri, when that was thinly settled, and in 1846 removed from there to Taney, now Stone County, and settled on Crane Creek. There they remained until the war, and in 1862 he removed with three of his sons to Texas. His death occurred at Ft. Griffin, Shackleford County, Tex., about 1883, when seventy-seven years of age. He followed farming through life and met with fair success. His father, Noble Anderson, was born in South Carolina, and his grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier. The mother of our subject died in the Lone Star State about 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson were the parents of nine children: John H., subject; Polly, wife of David P. Parker, died at Aurora; Francis M., a farmer of Blanco County, Tex.; David died in Texas; Parsedda Trammell, of Texas; Martha Ann, deceased, was the wife of Hiram Leath; James N., of Brown County, Tex.; William...

Biography of J. Frank Seaman

J. FRANK SEAMAN. Among the reputable men of Galena who have made their home in Stone County since 1865, is J. Frank Seaman, whose birth occurred at Carrollton, Carroll County, Arkansas, October 1, 1847. His father, Hon. John F. Seaman, was born in Saratoga County, New York, in 1812, and was of Scotch origin. He remained in his native county until grown, and then became a driver on the Erie Canal. Following this, he became a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in 1834 emigrated to Michigan, where he resided two years. In 1836 he was appointed a missionary to the Cherokee Indians, and was in their nation for two years, after which he was transferred to the Arkansas conference. After a little he gave up his ministerial duties and began the study of medicine under Dr. Forest, of Huntsville, Madison County, Arkansas. Up to 1844 or 1845 he practiced medicine, and then engaged in merchandising at Carrollton. While there, he married Miss Sophia E. Kenner, August 18, 1846, and there remained until 1862, when, on account of his Union sentiments, it became unpleasant for him and he moved to Lawrence County, Missouri. There he resumed the practice of medicine and also tilled the soil until 1869, when he again embarked in merchandising, following this at Marionville, Missouri, until his death, which occurred suddenly, on March 27, 1870. He was a strong Union man, and after the war became a stanch Republican. Mrs. Seaman is still living at Marionville, and is now sixty-nine years of age. She was born in Tennessee, and was the daughter of C. E....

Biography of Thomas L. Viles

THOMAS L. VILES. To attain success in any calling, it is necessary that a man should be possessed of a keen and discerning mind, with the energy and determination to push his business or profession instead of allowing it to push him. These qualities are possessed in an eminent degree by Thomas L. Viles, who is the able prosecuting attorney of Stone County, in which he has made his home for many years. He is a native of Roane County, Tennessee, where he was born October 3, 1850. The son of John and Martha (Roberts) Viles, who were also Tennesseans. They left the State of their birth when their son Thomas L. was a small boy, and located in Illinois; but after remaining in that State for two years, came to Missouri, and in 1854 took up their residence in Stone County, in the northern part of which they settled on a farm, being among its pioneer settlers. In 1862 they moved to Christian County, Missouri, and there the mother was called from life the same year; she was a devoted member of the Baptist Church. The father enlisted in the Fourteenth Missouri Cavalry, and served about eighteen months, first as orderly sergeant, for a few months, and then as first lieutenant of Company F. His regiment was consolidated with the Eighth Missouri Regiment in 1863, and then, receiving honorable discharge, returned home. He saw some hard fighting during his service, and was a faithful and valuable soldier. After the war was over, he began farming in Christian County and there made his home with the three children left...

Biography of William Hembree

WILLIAM HEMBREE. This well-known business man and successful farmer of James Township, Stone County, Missouri, is a product of the Hoosier State, born in Dubois County, March 9, 1836, to the union of John and Maggie Hembree. The father was born in Knox County, Tennessee, and when a young man went to Indiana, was married in Dubois County, and when our subject was six or ten years of age the family came by horse and ox teams to what is now Taney County, Missouri, locating on Bull Creek, where Mr. Hembree improved a farm. Later he moved to White River in Stone County, and still later, farther up White River, where he made his home until the war broke out. He then removed to a point near Buffalo, in Dallas County, and resided there until peace was declared, when he returned to Stone County, locating just below Galena, where he died soon after. He was a lifelong and successful farmer, and was one of the pioneers of the upper White River country. He was a militiaman during the war, a man whose upright, honorable career commended him to all. His father, Drew Hembree, also came to Taney County and there died when our subject was a boy. He was probably born in Tennessee and was a farmer by occupation. The mother of our subject died in Dallas County during the war. Previous to her marriage to Mr. Hembree, she had married a Mr. Butler, by whom she had three children; John, David and James. Her second union resulted in the birth of seven children as follows: Simeon, who went...

Biography of Hervy A. Massey

HERVY A. MASSEY. This worthy citizen, who is one of the leading farmers and stockraisers of Stone County, Missouri, was born in Greene County, Missouri, in 1846, and is a son of Nathaniel and Nancy (Ellison) Massey, who were natives of Tennessee. Previous to marriage, and when children, they came with their parents to Greene County, Missouri, and there, after growing up, their nuptials were solemnized. After marriage they located four miles east of Springfield, on the wild prairie, where they improved a good farm and spent the balance of their days, he dying in 1869, when about forty-seven years of age, and she in 1860. The mother was a Cumberland Presbyterian in her religious views. Mr. Massey was a successful farmer and stock trader and a public-spirited, self-made man. During the war he was a Government contractor, furnishing stock and general supplies to the army. In politics he was a Democrat and a Union man. His father, James Massey, was probably born in the green isle of Erin, but came to this country at an early day and settled in Tennessee. Later he moved to Greene County, Missouri, and located a few miles east of Springfield, where he became the owner of a good farm. There his death occurred during the war. He was twice married and was the father of twenty-two children. His last wife, who died February 15, 1894, married Allen Gentry, of Stone County. Grandfather Thomas Ellison was a Revolutionary soldier, coming to this country from Ireland at an early day and settling in Greene County, Missouri, where his death occurred before the war. His...

Biography of J. D. Melton

J. D. MELTON. The question of food supplies is one that agitates the whole human family, and is the first with which they have to grapple. Without doubt the well-appointed grocery establishment furnishes the best solution of feeding the masses, and in this connection due reference is made to that over which J. D. Melton presides and of which he is the proprietor. He was born in the neighborhood of Galena, Missouri, December 6, 1842, a son of Austin and Elsie (Haley) Melton, and grandson of Ansel Melton, who was one of the pioneers of Tennessee. In that State Austin Melton was born in 1805, and from that region he came to Polk County, Missouri, in 1834, and there made his home for some three or four years. He then came to Stone County and settled about one mile south of where Galena now stands, on 100 acres of Government land, which he entered. Oh this land he built a log house in which he lived until 1858, when he moved to the town of Galena. After the death of his wife there he moved to Laclede County and from that time until his death, which occurred in 1892, he resided on a farm about eight miles from Lebanon. All his life he was a Democrat and held a number of township offices. His wife, a Tennessean by birth, bore him eleven children, seven sons and four daughters: Elizabeth, John, Catherine, Elisha, Emeline, James A., George, Martha, William, J. D. and Thomas, of whom five are living. The second wife was Mary Dennis, by whom he became father of...

Biography of James Harlin Hale

JAMES HARLIN HALE. In all ages of the world industry, perseverance and energy, where intelligently applied, have achieved results which could only have been gained by having one end in view, and by improving every opportunity of ultimately attaining that object. Mr. Hale is an example of what can be accomplished when the spirit of determination is exercised, in connection with the every-day affairs of life. His farming and stockraising operations have resulted most satisfactorily, and he is one of the substantial men of his section. Like so many of the representative men of Christian County, Mr. Hale is a Tennessean, born in Washington County, October 10, 1832. His parents, Mark and Polly (Mulkey) Hale, were natives of that county also, the former born in 1809 and the latter in 1811. They were reared and married in that county, and, when our subject was a boy, they removed to Barren County, Kentucky, where Mrs. Hale died two years later. Mr. Hale returned to Tennessee, and was married in McMinn County, that State, to Miss Long. Soon after, he removed to Barren County, Kentucky, where he made his home until 1850, at which date he removed to McMinn County, Tennessee, and thence to Bradley County the following year. In 1852 he came to what is now Christian County, Missouri, but later settled in Stone County, where he remained until 1858, when he returned to Barren County, Kentucky His death occurred about 1870. He was a blacksmith, and followed that trade all his life. He was married three times. His second wife became the mother of two children: John and Henry....
Page 2 of 512345

Pin It on Pinterest