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Lee, Nancy Ann Pointer – Obituary

Lee–In Stockton, September 7, 1932, Mrs. Nancy Ann Lee, widow of the late Jay Right Lee, mother of Sarah Anna Thomas of Walla Walla, Wash., Rosalie Shinkosky of Stockton, Ethel Delano of Hooper, Wash., Addie Thomas of Bremerton, Wash., Goldie Nickerson of Stockton, Jessie Day of Sacramento, Manuel Lee of Colfax, Wash., Clarence Lee of Fairfield, Wash., Jay Right Lee, Stockton; sister of William Pointer of Los Angeles, Sarah James of Dayton, Wash., Ossie Pointer of Spokane, Wash.; a native of Walla Walla, Wash., aged 65 years, 8 months, and 29 days. Friends are invited to attend the funeral services this evening (Thursday, Sept. 8), 8 o’clock, at the chapel of B. C. Wallace, 520 North Sutter Street. Remains will be shipped tomorrow evening, Friday, Sept. 9, on the 7:50 o’clock Southern Pacific train to Colfax, Wash. Interment in Colfax Cemetery. Stockton Daily Evening Record, September 8, 1932 Contributed by: Shelli...

Findley, Ada Frances Holman – Obituary

FINDLEY–In Stockton, Calif., February 11, 1948, ADA FRANCES FINDLEY, wife of the late Frank N. Findley; beloved mother of Mrs. Pearl Carpenter of Stockton; loving grandmother of Mrs. Fern Higuera of Stockton and George Lyons of San Francisco; great grandmother of Charles Higuera of Stockton; a native of Missouri; aged 85 years, 2 months, 13 days. Friends are invited to attend funeral services Saturday, February 14, 1948 at 10:30 AM in the chapel of Frisbie & Warren, 809 North California Street at Flora. Committal at Rural Cemetery. Stockton Record, February 12, 1948 Contributed by: Shelli...

Cooke, Edward V. – Obituary

Edward V. Cooke, 84, long-time Ellensburg resident, died at a local nursing home Wednesday. Born May 4, 1888 in Ellensburg, he was son of pioneer family, Father was C. P. Cooke, Mother Verenda Wheeler, whose parents were early-day settlers here in the valley. He was married to Ada Rich 1908, in the Fairview District. They moved to Yakima, where he learned the plastering trade and later went into contracting. He lived in Portland, Ore., and Stockton, Calif. and returned to Yakima and later moved back to Ellensburg, where they purchased a home o Rt. 3, and lived until his retirement. In 1964 they moved to E. Eighth street, and then moved to Trinal Manor. He is survived by his wife, two daughters, Mrs. Nina Bauer and Mrs. Cleroa Pickup, both of Ellensburg; two sons, Rex, of Klickitat, and Carl of Wenatchee; two sisters, Mrs. Marjorie Gillis, of Kittitas, and Mrs. Susan Huss, of Ellensburg; eight grandchildren and 19 great grandchildren. Funeral will be Friday, 2 p.m. Evenson’s Chapel. Rev. Craig Willis will officiate. Burial will follow in I.O.O.F. Cemetery. Edward Vander Cooke died June 28, 1972. He married Ada Cleora Rich on June 24, 1908. According to the 1900 Kittitas Co. census, his father was Edward Cooke. Charles P. Cooke was his grandfather. The headstone below shows his...

Biography of David D. Banta

David D. Banta is the business manager and principal owner of the Riverside Mills. This mill was built by the Riverside Mill Company, Walker & Banta, in May, 1887, and conducted by that firm until the death of Mr. Walker in 1888, since which time Mr. Banta has had the sole management of the enterprise. The Riverside Mills ranks as one of the leading industries of the city, being 106 x 40 feet, and is fitted with the most improved machinery for the manufacture of doors, sash, moldings and all class of work required in building and interior finishing. Mr. Banta, a skilled workman of years of experience, is one of the largest employers of skilled labor in the city, engaging some fifteen men, most of whom are mechanics. The machinery of his works is run by steam, requiring an engine of thirty-horsepower. Mr. Banta was born in Bergen County, New Jersey, in 1859, and was reared and schooled in his native place until eighteen years of age. He then went to New York City and entered upon an apprenticeship at the carpenter and builder’s trade. After serving as an apprentice for four years he engaged as a journeyman, working in that city. He spent nearly six years in New York City and then started Westward, and was engaged as a carpenter and builder in Chicago, and later in Kansas City. In 1883 he came to California, and after six months in San Francisco located in Stockton, and was there employed as a foreman by the firm of P. A. Buell & Co., and later as their bookkeeper. In...

Parlier, Lola G. Madill Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Lola G. Madill Parlier, 84, of Baker City, died Sept. 13, 2004, at her home. Her funeral will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2, at Grace Methodist Church in Stockton, Calif. She is interred with her husband at Park View Cemetery in French Camp, Calif. She was born on Dec. 21, 1919, at French Camp and had lived at Stockton, Calif., until January. She was a graduate of Manteca High School and the College of the Pacific at Stockton. She taught kindergarten at Jefferson and Fillmore Schools. She was a lifetime member of Beta Sigma Phi. She belonged to many social and civic groups, including the Philamatheon Club and the Stockton Garden Club. She was a member of Grace Methodist Church. Her lifelong interest included gardening, music, bridge and fishing. She was preceded in death by her husband of 52 years, Dale Parlier and her good friend, Ed Grant. Survivors include her brother, Mike Madill; a sister, Rita Simms of Anchorage, Alaska; her daughter and son-in-law, Lynne and Philip Burroughs of Baker City; her son and daughter-in-law, Ed and Donna Parlier of Corvallis, Mont.; three grandchildren and a great-grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Diabetes Association, P.O. Box 1131, Fairfax, VA 22038-1131 or online at www.diabetes.org. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, September 24, 2004 Transcribed by: Belva...

Biography of Ottley Papineau

Ottley Papineau, is a manufacturer and dealer in harness, saddles, buggy robes, etc., and also proprietor of one of the leading business establishments of Riverside. His products are well known in the county and his trademark “O. P.” is a sufficient guarantee for first-class material and workmanship. The subject of this sketch is a native of England, dating his birth in London, in 1846. The first ten years of his life was spent in that city and at Canterbury in attending school. In 1856 he went to Australia and joined his father, who had preceded him to that country in 1852. His father located in Sydney, and there Mr. Papineau engaged in schooling until the summer of 1858, when he removed with his parents to Melbourne, Victoria, and attended school there until seventeen years of age. He was then apprenticed at the harness and saddlers’ trade, and after serving his apprenticeship worked as a journeyman in that city until 1874. In that year he immigrated to the United States, and upon his arrival in California located in Stockton. The next year he decided to seek a home in Southern California, and came to Los Angeles, where he obtained employment at his trade with Bell & Green, and later was manager of a well-known harness shop of William M. Osborne. In 1882, seeking a desirable location in which to establish himself in business, he came to Riverside, and in February of that year opened a harness establishment on Main street, between Ninth and Tenth streets. May 1, 1890, he removed to the new store on Eighth Street, in the Daily...

Biography of George W. Suttonfield

George W. Suttonfield was born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, February 14, 1825. His father, Colonel William Suttonfield, a native of Virginia, was in the regular army, under General Harrison, in the Black Hawk war. He built the first house in Fort Wayne and lived there until his death, which occurred in 1841. His wife, Laura (Taylor) Suttonfield, was a native of Connecticut. They had six children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fourth. He attended Wabash College at Crawfordsville, Indiana, for four years, and in 1849 came to California. He started from Fort Smith, Arkansas, in April, and in October of the same year arrived in San Francisco. Mr. Suttonfield can tell some interesting stories of how they had to eat dried pumpkins and beans for many days at a time. Their train was a wealthy one from the South. They had some very fine stock, but lost heavily and arrived on the coast with almost nothing. Many of them were afoot and out of provisions. At one time all that Mr. Suttonfield had was but a pint of green coffee. He crossed the Colorado Desert afoot and followed a trail to San Diego. From there he went to San Francisco on a coal bark, and didn’t have a cent of money when he got there. He knocked around all day and got very hungry. At last he bargained to work for a restaurant keeper at $1 a day, digging and wheeling a bank of earth into the bay. He played a few games of cards and won $16. At night he unloaded vessels at $2...

Biography of Hon. Henry Montague Willis

Hon. Henry Montague Willis, San Bernardino, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, September 21. 1831. His ancestors were among the first English settlers of the colony of Virginia and Maryland prior to the Revolution. His father, Mr. Henry H. Willis, was a captain in the merchant marine, with whom the subject of this memoir made a number of voyages before he was twelve years of age, alternating between school and the sea. At the age of twelve he adopted a seafaring life, and during six years’ sailing the briny deep he visited the ports of the Mediterranean, England, France, Ireland, Rio Janeiro, Montevideo, Buenos Ayres, Pernambuco and Valparaiso, and rose by successive steps to full seaman, and finally to officer of the vessel. While in Rio Janeiro in 1848 as second mate of the bark Helen M. Fiedler, a fleet of clippers arrived with the first passengers for the gold fields of California. This was the first intelligence received of the discovery of gold. One of the ships of this fleet being disabled, his vessel was chartered to carry a portion of her passengers to California; and loading with such cargo as was most appropriate for the market of San Francisco, the bark started on her voyage. June 28, 1849; the vessel anchored in San Francisco harbor, having touched only at Valparaiso for supplies. Soon after his arrival the young mariner purchased an interest in the pilot-boat Eclipse, and with his associates ran her up the Sacramento River with a cargo of freight and passengers; but being attacked by the chills and fever Mr. Willis abandoned this enterprise and took...

Eccles, Richard David – Obituary

Richard David Eccles, 78, of Stockton, Calif., died Saturday, May 3, 2003, in a hospital. A memorial service was held in Stockton. Eccles was born Sept. 2, 1924, in Hood River and lived in Whitney and Prairie City where he attended the first grade. He lived in Stockton for 50 years. Eccles was a self-employed helicopter pilot for 40 years, and was a former president of Helicopter Association of American and Helicopter Association International. He served in the Naval Air Corps as a lieutenant and was a veteran of World War II and the Korean War. He is survived by his children, Richard, Kathleen and Robert, a brother Samuel Davis Eccles of Nyssa, Oregon and Naomi Ann Eccles Chitwood and six grandchildren. Memorials may be made to the American Diabetes Association, San Joaquin Chapter, 2720 Gateway Oaks, Suite 1 Used with permission from: The Record Courier, Baker City, Oregon, May, 2003 Transcribed by: Belva...

Biography of Marcellus Marcus Pietrzycki, M.D.

MARCELLUS MARCUS PIETRZYCKI, M.D. – Doctor Pietrzycki, the well-known surgeon, was born April 25, 1843, in Horodyszeze, Sambor District, Galicia, Austria, and was educated as an apothecary and chemist. He came to the United States in 1866, before the Austro-Prussian war. He engaged, soon after his arrival in the United States, as assistant and prescription clerk with Doctor Arnold of Hazelton, Pennsylvania, who had a very extensive coal-mining practice, and remained with him for one year studying medicine. He emigrated to California in the fall of 1867, and settled in San Francisco, receiving the appointment as an apothecary in the German Hospital, where he remained for five years, during part of which time he attended the Pacific (now Cooper) Medical College, from which he graduated in 1872. The next spring he went to Stockton, California, to practice his profession, and in November, 1873, remove to Rio Vista in Solano county, California. We quote from the history of Solano county, California: “Doctor Pietrzycki came to this county in November, 1873, and settled in Rio Vista, where he now resides and practices medicine. He always took an active part in enterprises pertaining to the welfare of the town. He was twice elected school trustee, and also clerk of the board. He took a very active part, and, in fact was one of the prime movers in establishing the Montezuma telegraph line from Suisun to Rio Vista. He married, June 29, 1876, Miss Mary Warren of San Mateo, daughter of Rev. J.H. Warren, superintendent of the Home Missionary Society of the Congregational church.” He left California in November of 1879 for Portland,...
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