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Biography of James W. Miller

Was born near Staunton, Augusta county, Virginia, May 14, 1823, where he lived with his parents, George M. and Margaret A. Miller, until his fourteenth year. He received a common school education, having attended the early subscription schools of his native county. Leaving home in 1836, he went to Lexington, Rockbridge county, Virginia, where he was employed as a clerk in the store of Moore & McCue, remaining with them until 1840, when he was employed in the same capacity by Samuel B. Finley, of the same place. From Lexington he went to Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1842, and accepted a situation as clerk in the store of John Cochran, remaining until 1843, when he returned to Augusta county and was employed by Thomas McCorkle, of Greenville, where he remained until 1847, then became associated with his employer as a partner, at Anthony’s Creek, Greenbrier county, Virginia, under the firm name of McCorkle & Miller. Retiring from the firm in 1848, he went to Hillsborough, Pocahontas county, same State, where he established himself in the mercantile business and continued there until 1854, when he migrated to Missouri, and settled upon a farm in what is now Jamesport township, this county. In 1861 he cast his lot with the Confederacy, enlisting in the Missouri State Guards, under General William Y. Slack, Captain John McNeel, and serving during the war in the Trans-Mississippi department, General Sterling Price commanding… At the conclusion of hostilities he returned to Daviess county and, from that time up to 1877, gave his entire attention to farm pursuits, but since the latter date has been employed by different...

Letter from John Crosby, Deputy Clerk, to Franklin D. Love

Staunton, Virginia, May 13th, 1903. Mr. F.D. Love, Georgetown, Texas. Dear Sir: I am in receipt of your letter of the 14th, of April, last, addressed to the Clerk, which has been handed to me by him for reply. Our records run back to 1745, the records show the names of Robert, Samuel, Ephriam and Joseph Love, who came to this county from Pennsylvania about 1747, but as these old records are poorly indexed and some of them not indexed at all, it is quite a laborious task to look up matters of this character, and I could not undertake to furnish you with the information desired for a less sum that a fee of $25.00, on receipt of the amount I will gladly take the matter up and ascertain what the records in this office show in reference to the Loves, I have quite recently been interest in an other branch of this same family and have a great deal of information already compiled. Yours very truly, John Crosby, Deputy Clerk. Note: This is the place from which great-grandfather, Robert Love, came, and doubtless these records show a vast amount of information that I have not yet ascertained. It is not an established fact as to the exact number of brothers that this Robert Love had, nor has it been ascertained definitely that Daniel Love was his grandfather, nor is known exactly how many brothers his Father, Samuel Love, had, besides Joseph, who married a Tase. If these records were closely searched the whole thing would perhaps be solved.-F.D....

Biography of William Horner Cocke

With various corporate interests William Horner Cocke has been closely associated, these various business enterprises benefiting by the stimulus of his industry, keen sagacity and capable management. He has made for himself a most creditable position in business circles and since 1908 has been president and general manager of the Commercial Acid Company which in 1918 became the Southern Acid & Sulphur Company of St. Louis, while with various other concerns he is also associated as stockholder or official. He was born in City Point, Virginia, September 12, 1874. His father, Henry Teller Cocke, was born in Prince George county, Virginia, October 5, 1841, and came of English ancestry, the family having been founded in Surry county, Virginia, in 1684. Representatives in the direct line remained In Prince George county, which was formerly a part of Surry county until William H. Cocke left Missouri in 1894 or for a period of two hundred and ten years. They were always prominent in the social and political life of Virginia. Henry Teller Cocke served for four years with the Prince George Cavalry of the Confederate army and in days of peace devoted his time to farming and merchandising. He married Elizabeth Welsh Horner in December, 1870. She was born April 3, 1848, at Warrenton, Virginia, and was also of English lineage, the Horners having first settled at Port Tobacco, Maryland, but in the early part of the eighteenth century they removed to Fauquier county, Virginia. Henry Teller Cocke died on the 20th of December, 1888, and his wife passed away February 27, 1918, having long survived her husband. William Horner Cocke...

Biographical Sketch of John McKinney

John McKinney, of Staunton, Virginia, served in the American army during the latter part of the revolution, and had his thigh broken by a musket ball, which lamed him for life. He settled at Lexington, Kentucky, where he taught school, and was elected Sheriff of the County. He married a Mexican woman, by whom he raised a large family. In 1805 he came to Missouri on a trading and prospecting tour, and in 1809 he moved his family here. When the Indian war began, he took his family back to Kentucky, to get them out of danger. His son Alexander remained married Nancy Bryan, who was only sixteen years of age, and settled near Charrette creek, in (now) Warren County. He was a surveyor and a fine business man, and accumulated a fortune before his death. He also served in the State Legislature during several sessions. His sister Elizabeth married John King, who settled near Marthasville. John McKinney traveled back and forth between Kentucky and Missouri as long as he lived, trading in land and land...

Biography of Tams Bixby

When historians of the future write of the state of Oklahoma, or recite the romance of the American Indian, they needs must tell the story of Tams Bixby. Above his signature five great Indian nations ceased to be, one hundred and one thousand red-men foreswore allegiance to their tribal chieftains to become citizens of the United States and twenty-one million acres of Indian hunting grounds were made ready for admission to the Union. It was in 1897 that Tams Bixby left Minnesota, where he had gained national prominence as chairman of the Republican state central committee and came to Indian Territory with a portfolio from President McKinley as a commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. Here in the Indian Territory the people of the five tribes the Choctaws, Chickasaws, Cherokees, Seminoles and Creeks were making their last stand against the advancing civilization of the white man. Driven from their homes in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi they had migrated hence with great fortitude and suffering to a land that had been promised them “as long as grass grows and water flows.” Already they had adopted the white man’s modes of living in a rough wild way but they clung, with the fidelity of their fathers, to their tribal forms of government. Each nation owned its land in common, each red-man squatted upon that ground which best pleased him and there built his abode. And now the inevitable advance of the white man, the march of civilization that would not be denied, was pressing down upon them, crowding them further and further beyond-and there was no other place for them to...

Biography of Rev. St. Michael Fackler

THE REV. ST. MICHAEL FACKLER. – The Reverend Mr. Fackler was the first clergyman of the Protestant Episcopal church in Oregon. He was a native of Staunton, Virginia, first moved to Missouri, and then crossed the plains for his health in the year 1847. This was greatly improved by the trip; and he soon undertook such work as he could do, teaching and preaching as opportunity offered. For a short time he taught in the Methodist school at Salem, the progenitor of the present Willamette University. At an early day he secured a farm not far from Butteville, where he resided for a number of years. While thus occupied in secular affairs he was not idle as a clergyman; for he spent his Sundays in holding services at Champoeg, Butteville, Stringtown, Oregon City, Portland and on the Tualatin Plains. In the course of time he fitted up a schoolhouse at Champoeg for services and built a neat little church at Butteville, doing most of the work with his own hands. It was the day of small things then, and those who knew anything of the Episcopal church were very few indeed. In 1853 the Reverend Mr. Fackler was one of a small number of Episcopalians who met at Oregon City to consult in regard to the interests of the church in the then territories of Oregon and Washington. He was appointed chairman of a committee to draft a report to be sent to the board of missions in New York, asking for the appointment of a missionary bishop for these territories. The report concluded with the recommendation that the...

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