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The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew Jackson, who witnessed a similar one that of Tecumseh in council assembled with the Muskogee’s, shortly afterwards of which I will speak in the history of that once powerful and war-like race of people. Colonel John Pitchlynn was adopted in early manhood by the Choctaws, and marrying among them, he at once became as one of their people; and was named by them “Chahtah It-ti-ka-na,” The Choctaws Friend; and long and well he proved himself worthy the title Conferred upon, and the trust confided in him. He had five sons by his Choctaw wife, Peter, Silas, Thomas, Jack and James, all of who prove to be men of talent, and exerted a moral influence among their people, except Jack, who was ruined by the white man s whiskey and his demoralizing examples and influences. I was personally acquainted with Peter. Silas and Jack, the former held, during a long and useful life, the highest positions in the political history of his Nation, well deserving the title given him by the...

Slave Narrative of Frank Cannon

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Frank Cannon R.F.D. Location: Palestine, Arkansas Age: 77 “I was born three miles west of Starkville, Mississippi on a pretty tolerable large farm. My folks was bought from a speculator drove come by. They come from Sanders in South Ca’lina. Master Charlie Cannon bought a whole drove of us, both my grandparents on both sides. He had five farms, big size farms. Saturday was ration day. “Our master built us a church in our quarters and sont his preacher to preach to us. He was a white preacher. Said he wanted his slaves to be Christians. “I never went to school in my life. I was taught by the fireside to be obedient and not steal. “We et outer trays hewed out of logs. Three of us would eat together. We had wooden spoons the boys made whittling about in cold rainy weather. We all had gourds to drink outer. When we had milk we’d get on our knees and turn up the tray, same way wid pot-liquor. They give the grown up the meat and us pot-liquor. “Pa was a blacksmith. He got a little work from other plantations. The third year of the surrender he bought us a cow. The master was dead. He never went to war. He went in the black jack thickets. His sons wasn’t old enough to go to war. Pa seemed to like ole master. The overseer was white looking like the master but I don’t know if he was white man or nigger. Ole master wouldn’t let him whoop much as he pleased. Master held...

Biography of Charles R. Freeman

Since 1902 Charles R. Freeman has been practicing law in Checotah, and he is numbered among the representative members of the legal profession in the state. He was born in Clay county, Mississippi, on the 8th of November, 1875, a son of John P. and Anna (Lyon) Freeman, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Mississippi. For some time the father followed agricultural pursuits in his native state and upon the outbreak of the Civil war continued to reside there until the last year of the war, when he enlisted for active service. At the close of the war he went to Mississippi where he bought some land and previous to his death he owned several plantations. His demise occurred in February, 1902. Mrs. Freeman died in May, 1883. Charles R. Freeman received his early education in the common schools of Clay county, Mississippi, and later enrolled in the Iuka Normal Institute at Iuka, that state, graduating from that institution in 1898, with the A. B. degree. Subsequently, determining upon a legal career, he entered the University of Mississippi at Oxford and he received his LL. B. degree in 1901. For the following year he practiced in Starkville, Mississippi, and in October, 1902, came to Checotah. He has built up an extensive and lucrative practice and handles much important litigation before the courts. He has ever remained a student of his profession and has one of the largest law libraries in the state. Outside of his practice Mr. Freeman has other interests being a stockholder and director in the Peoples National Bank of Checotah and...

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