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Biography of Isaac Burrows Snow

ISAAC BURROWS SNOW – Forty years of experience in the insurance business, preceded by several years of pioneer railroading in the West, represents the experience of Isaac Burrows Snow, who is now living retired in Bernardston. Mr. Snow is a member of the Mayflower Society, being a direct descendant of Elder William Brewster, and of Stephen Hopkins, of the “Mayflower.” Nicholas Snow, the immigrant ancestor of Mr. Snow’s line, came to Plymouth in the ship “Ann” in 1623, and had a share in the division of land in Plymouth in 1624. In 1634 he settled in Eastham, Massachusetts, where he was prominent in town affairs, serving in various public capacities, including the offices of deputy to the General Court and assistant to Governor Prince (or Prence). He married, at Plymouth, Constance Hopkins, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, who came in the “Mayflower,” and the line descends through their son Mark, who married Jane Prince (or Prence), daughter of Governor Thomas Prince; their son Nicholas; their son Jonathan; their son Isaac; their son Deacon Prence Snow, born in Rochester, Massachusetts, June 1, 1746, died April 23, 1828, removed to Bernardston, Massachusetts, in April, 1782, married Content Doty; their son, Deacon Thomas, who was the grandfather of Isaac Burrows Snow. Deacon Thomas Snow, son of Deacon Prence and Content (Doty) Snow, was born in Rochester, Massachusetts, November 9, 1771, and died June 20, 1858. He married, January 20, 1801, Sybil Parmenter, who was born in 1778, and died in 1865, daughter of Elias Parmenter. Their children were: Thomas Anson; Ransel Sheldon; Sophronia Parmenter; Content Doty; Jonathan; Frances Newcomb; Edward Hoyt; Barnabas, of...

Biography of Thaddeus Constantine Frazier, M. D.

Thaddeus Constantine Frazier, M. D. A useful life crowded with activity and crowned with achievement both as a physician and as a citizen, Dr. Thaddeus C. Frazier, of Coffeyville, may still further be considered because he is the pioneer medical man of this city. For forty-two years he has been a physician and surgeon here and additionally has been a leader in all forward movements, accepting public positions as a helpful means of progress for the city, encouraging educational movements and through his stability of character conferring honor upon this whole section. Doctor Frazier was born in Henry County, Tennessee, December 14, 1841. His parents were William and Judith Ann (Sheb) Frazier. The Fraziers were of Scotch extraction but the founders of the American branch came from the North of Ireland and settled in Virginia and North Carolina in colonial days. The grandfather of Doctor Frazier, Julian Frazier, was born in North Carolina. He removed to Tennessee where he subsequently died leaving a large estate to his children. He had been an influential man in politics and at one time served as a member of the Tennessee Legislature. William Frazier, father of Doctor Frazier, was born in North Carolina, in 1812, and died at Wichita, Kansas, in 1895. He married Judith Ann Sheb, who was born in Henry County, Tennessee, in 1815, and died there in 1845. They were the parents of four children: Samuel V., who died in 1872, in Green County, Missouri, was in business as a country merchant; Thaddeus C.; William M., who is a resident of Los Angeles, California, is a wholesale dealer in fruit...

Biography of Hon. Orlando B. Ficklin

Hon. Orlando B. Ficklin, attorney at law, Charleston; he was born in Kentucky Dec. 16, 1808, being the son of William and Elizabeth Kenner (Williams) Ficklin, both of Virginia. His early education was obtained in country schools, in Kentucky and Missouri, except about one year, which he spent at Cumberland College, located at Princeton, Caldwell Co., Ky., under the auspices of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His parents having removed to Potosi, Washington Co., Mo., he commenced the study of law with Henry Shurlds of that place, who was afterward elected to the Circuit Court bench, and at a later period removed to St. Louis and engaged in banking until his death; Mr. Ficklin spent the winter of 1829 and 1830 in the law office of Gen. Robert Farris, of St. Louis; in March, 1830, he was admitted to the bar at Bellville, St. Clair Co., Ill., having been examined by Edward Cowles, then an old and well-established lawyer of that place; from thence he went to McLeansboro, Hamilton Co., Ill., meeting there with Chief Justice William Wilson, who advised him to locate in Mount Carmel, Wabash Co., Ill.; Mr. Ficklin attended the courts of that circuit commencing at Carmi, and when the circuit closed, he located at Mt. Carmel. In 1832, he went to the Black Hawk war in Capt. Elias Jurdon’s Company, and at the organization of the regiments and brigades, was appointed Quartermaster, and was attached to the brigade of Gem Milton R. Alexander, then of Paris, Ill.; in 1833, he was elected Colonel of the militia of Wabash Co., under the old militia system, long since...

Biography of Hon. H. A. Neal

Hon. H. A. Neal, attorney at law, Charleston; is a native of’ New Hampshire; he was born in Tuftonborough, Carroll Co., Dec. 13, 1846; he was raised on a farm until he was ten years of age, and then his parents removed to Great Falls, N. H.; he attended the public schools of that city until 1863, when the family returned to the farm; in the fall of 1864, he entered the army as a member of Co. K, 18t N. H. Heavy Artillery, and served till the close of the war; on his return, he attended one term in the Academy at Effingham, N. H., and the following winter taught a country school; in the spring of 1866, he went to Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and pursued a commercial course of study in Eastman’s Business College, where he graduated in September following; he at once came West, and engaged in teaching in Coles Co.; the next year, he became Principal of the Grammar School in. Paris, and, in 1868, went to Watseka, Iroquois Co., Ill., where he had charge of the public schools for three years; the winters of 1871 and 1872, he spent in the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, reading during vacations in the office of Wiley & Parker, in Charleston; he was admitted to the bar in June, 1873, and began practice in Charleston; in 1.875, he entered into partnership with Messrs. Wiley & Parker, the firm becoming Wiley. Parker & Neal; in 1876, Mr. Parker moved to St. Louis, since which time the firm has been Wiley & Neal. He...
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