Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Albert Joseph Davis

Albert Joseph Davis is successfully engaged in the investment business lit St. Louis as the head of the firm of A. J. Davis & Company, which he organized in 1911 and which deals in corporation and municipal bonds. He is a native son of St. Louis, his birth having occurred on the 25th of June, 1883, his parents being Thomas D. and Martha (Littler) Davis, the former born in Cardiff. Wales, and the latter in Newbigging, Musselburgh, Parish of Imberesk, County of Edinburgh, Scotland. His education was obtained in the graded and high schools of St. Louis and in 1901, when a youth of eighteen years, he became connected with the Winkle Terra Cotta Company, serving as assistant to the secretary and as private secretary to Joseph Winkle, the president of the concern, until September, 1908. He then entered the investment business and three years later organized the firm of A. J. Davis & Company for handling corporation and municipal bonds, in which connection he has since built up an enterprise of most extensive and gratifying proportions. In 1904, at Kirkwood, Missouri, Mr. Davis was united in marriage to Miss Mary Sneed, daughter of Samuel E. Sneed, and they have become parents of a son, John Hewitt, who was born on the 5th of April, 1911. Mr. Davis gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is widely recognized as a most progressive and public-spirited citizen whose aid and influence are ever found on the side of right, reform and improvement. In January, 1918, he was appointed director of personnel of the ordnance department of the United States...

Biographical Sketch of Charles Ferdinand Wimar

Charles Ferdinand Wimar, usually known as Carl Wimar, was born in Germany, 1828; died in St. Louis, November, 1862. Came to America and settled in St. Louis during the year 1843. A few years later he met the French artist Leon de Pomarede, with whom he later studied and made several journeys up the Missouri for the purpose of sketching. Went to Europe and returned to St. Louis about 1857. His Buffalo Hunt, now reproduced, was painted in 1860, exhibited at the St. Louis Fair during the autumn of that year, when it was seen by the Prince of Wales, later Edward VII, for whom a replica was...

Houses of the Illinois Confederacy

Although the tribes of the loosely constituted Illinois confederacy claimed and occupied a wide region east of the Mississippi, in later years centering in the valley of the Illinois River, nevertheless certain villages are known to have crossed and re-crossed the great river. Thus, in the early summer of 1673, Père Marquette arrived at a village of the Peoria then standing on the right Mississippi, at or near the or west bank of the later it had removed to the upper Illinois. Two months passing the Peoria, Marquette discovered another of  the Illinois tribes, the Michigamea, living near the northeastern corner of the present State of Arkansas, and consequently west of the Mississippi. On the map of Pierre van der Aa, circa 1720 two small streams are shown flowing into the Mississippi from the west, a short distance south of the Missouri. The more northerly of the two is probably intended to represent the Meramec and a dot at the north side of the mouth of the stream bears the legend: “Village des Ilinois et des Caskoukia “probably the Cahokia. This stream forms the boundary between Jefferson and St. Louis Counties, Missouri, and a short distance above its junction with the Mississippi are traces of a large villages with many stone-lined graves, probably indicating the position of the Illinois village of two centuries ago. Also on the d’Anville map, issued in the year 1755, an “Ancien Village Cahokias” is shown at a point corresponding with the mouth of the small Rivière des Pères, a stream which joins the Mississippi and there forms the southern boundary of the city of...

Biographical Sketch of Lawrence Long

Lawrence Long, of Culpepper Co., Va., settled in St. Louis Co., Mo., in 1797, and built a saw and grist mill. His children were Gabriel, John, William, James, Nicholas, Nancy, Sally, and Elizabeth. John married Rachel Zumwalt, by whom he had Lawrence and Andrew J. He died soon after, and in 1823 his widow and her two sons removed to Warren County, where she married Newton Howell. Lawrence married Malinda Hutchings, of St. Charles County. Andrew J. married Mary W. Preston of St. Charles...

Biographical Sketch of John Chambers

John Chambers, of Ireland, settled in North Carolina and married Mary Thompson, of Kentucky, by whom he had John, Jr., William, Sarah, James, Thomas, Alexander, Nancy, and Jane. In 1798 Mr. Chambers came to Missouri and settled in St. Louis County, and in 1800 his wife died. After that he lived with his son, Thomas, in St. Charles. Thomas married Eleanor Kennedy, and the names of their children were Prospect, Riley, Sarah, Julia, Harriet, Davis H., Ellen, Rhoda, and Thomas, Jr. Thomas and Alexander Chambers were rangers together in Captain Musick’s company, and were at the battle of the sinkhole in (now) Lincoln County. Alexander married the widow of Frank McDermid, who was killed at Callaway’s defeat. Her maiden name was Ruth Costlio. James, son of John Chambers, Sr., was a tanner and lived in (now) Warren...

Biographical Sketch of William Banks Rogers

Rogers, William Banks; clergyman; born at Cincinnati, Dec. 7, 1857; son of Joseph Hill and Mary Rose (Mcllvain) Rogers; academic and collegiate course St. Xavier’s College, 1869-1875; St. Stanislaus Seminary, Normal, Florissant, Mo., 1875-1879, Woodstock College, Maryland, philosophy, science, 1879-1881; Louvain, Belgium, metaphysics, ethics, 1881-1882; Woodstock College, theology, 1887-1891; taught English and classics, St. Ignatius College, Chicago, 1882-1884; St. Xavier’s College, Cincinnati, 1884-1887; ordained Roman Catholic priest, 1890; perfect studies, St. Xavier’s College, Cincinnati, 1891-1892, Marquette College, Milwaukee, 1893-1895, St. Louis University, 1896-1898; pres. Marquette College, 1898-1900, St. Louis University, 1900-1908; resigned February, 1908, on account of ill health; in 1903, secured Marion-Sims-Beaumont College of Medicine, St. Louis, as medical department, St. Louis...

Biography of Arthur Winford Goodwin

Arthur Winford Goodwin. When the details of his career have been examined it will be seen that Arthur W. Goodwin had been the architect of a successful career in commercial fields. He started at the bottom, laboring as a boy in country stores to pay his own way in the world. He gained more than mere wages. All those early experiences he had turned to profit since he became a business man on his own account, and at the present time he is a member of the firm which conducts the largest department and general merchandise establishment at Howard, in Elk County. He is of an old American family. The Goodwins came from England and settled in New Hampshire in Colonial days. His grandfather, Daniel Goodwin, was a native of New Hampshire, where he was born in 1795. Little more than a boy, he served as a soldier in the War of 1812. He subsequently became an early settler in Louisville, New York, where he followed the trade of carpenter and the business of farmer until his death in 1883 at the venerable age of eighty-eight. The father of the Howard merchant was Rev. W. C. Goodwin, who became well known in Kansas as a pioneer minister of the Methodist Church, and whose career is sketched above. Rev. Mr. Goodwin married Miss Ellen Southworth, who was born in Louisville, New York, in 1837, and died at Moline, Kansas, in January, 1884. A record of their children is as follows: Carl E., who is connected with the Polar Mercantile Company at Emporia, Kansas; Frank S., a farmer at Granada, Colorado;...

Cowles, Ada – Obituary

Baker City, Baker County, Oregon Ada M. Cowles, 83, a former Baker City resident, died January 9, 1999, at St. Louis, Mo. Private vault interment will be at Mount Hope Cemetery. Mrs. Cowles was born Feb. 13, 1915, at High Valley to Frank Leslie and Elva Virgie Ross Burford. She married Charles C. Cowles in Cove on December 31, 1936, and moved to Baker City in 1949. Mrs. Cowles was a homemaker and had lived in Missouri for the past 15 years. She was preceded in death by her parents, her husband and a son. Survivors include her niece, Margaret Shinoki of California: a nephew, Leslie Connell of Portland; and a great-niece, Amy Fae Shinoki. Memorial Contributions ay be made to a charity of one’s choice through the Coles-Strommer-Monroe Funeral Home, 1950 Place St., Baker City, OR 97814. Contributed by: Margaret...

Biography of Henry Jackson Waters

Henry Jackson Waters, president of the Kansas State Agricultural College at Manhattan since 1909, is a leader in that group of men who have served to elevate and dignify the science of agriculture. His work and influence are of growing value every passing year. His reputation is by no means confined to Kansas and Missouri, the states in which most of his work had been done. The agricultural journals and writers all over the country are coming to pay special attention and respect to any movement or experiment with which the name Henry Jackson Waters is in any way associated. Professor Waters was born at Center in Ralls County, Missouri, November 23, 1865, and is a son of the late George Washington and Lavinia Jane (Smith) Waters. His grandfather, George Waters, was a Tennesseean, moved from Wilson in that state to Missouri in 1829, and after a short residence in Pike County moved to a farm in Ralls County, where he not only followed farming but also preached as a minister of the Gospel. Professor Waters comes from a long line of agriculturists, and his father in particular was for years a noted authority on many phases of agriculture, and gained the reputation of being an expert not so much from his association with the former schools and laboratories of agriculture as from the stern school of practical experience. The late Col. George W. Waters was born in Ralls County, Missouri, August 1, 1836, and died at his home in Hope, Arkansas, February 23, 1906. He was reared in a country district, attended local schools, also an academy at...

Biography of Myron M. Buck

Myron M. Buck was born in Shortsville, Ontario county, New York, January 16, 1835. His ancestors settled in central New York, when the state was wild and uncultivated, his maternal grandfather, Theophilus Short, in whose honor Shortsville, New York, was named, having been a member of the “Old Holland Land Purchase Company,” and prominent in every way in the affairs of the community. Attracted by the fertility of the soil in this undeveloped district, the company purchased a large portion of central New York. They at once proceeded to establish homes for the pioneers who were the leading spirits. The venture was a daring one, but it proved so successful that not only did the settlers establish homes for themselves, but they were able to leave valuable legacies to their descendants. It was there that Myron M. Buck, founder of one of the largest railroad supply houses in the country, was born and spent his earlier years. His education, which was a good one for the time, was received in the public schools of his district, and at the age of eighteen years he was in a position to make his way in the world. He traveled extensively through, western New York and Canada, locating finally in New York City, where he secured employment in a manufacturing establishment. He showed great natural aptitude for this line of work, but, as it had always been his ambition to build up a business of his own, it was but natural that he should look farther west as the field best adapted to this idea. He removed to Chicago, where he spent...
Page 4 of 512345

Pin It on Pinterest