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Biographical Sketch of Horatio E. Needham

Horatio E. Needham is a native of Addison County, Vermont, born September 10, 1827, near the village of Shalott. While in his infancy his, parents migrated to St. Lawrence County, New York, remained six years, and then went to Cuyahoga County, Ohio, where they remained until 1852. During this time Horatio was employed on the farm and also at stone-cutting. In 1859 he went to Fremont County, Iowa, and in 1862 enlisted in Company E, Twenty-ninth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and was on duty three years, being in many important engagements, among which were the battles, of Little Rock, Helena, Mobile and Saline River, and his soldier life was extended through the States of Missouri, Kentucky, Mississippi, Louisiana,, Alabama, Arkansas, Texas and Iowa, until he was honorably discharged in 1865. After his return to Fremont County he was engaged in teaming for two years before his removal to Nebraska, where he took up a section of land which he afterward sold and came to Daviess County in 1875. He now owns and cultivates a fine farm in Sheridan Township. Mr. Needham was married, November 25, 1852, to Miss Lucina Bagley, a native of Ohio. Eight children have been born to them, five of whom are living: Whitfield H., Mary I., Ada A., Minnie E. and Willie...

Thomas Coburn

4. THOMAS2 COBURN (Asa1) was b. Sept. 9. 1790; m. Feb. 11, 1817, Almira Stone of Cornish, dau. of Dea. Josiah and Hannah (Weld) Stone, b. Sept. 2. 1792, and d. Jan. 6. 1869. They lived in Potsdam, N. Y. Children: i. HORATIO NEWTON. b. Oct. 19, 1817: d. May 24, 1820. ii. HIRAM BREWSTER, b. April 3, 1819. iii. MARTHA ALMIRA, b. Nov. 7, 1820. iv. SARAH JOANNA, b. July 22,...

Biography of Frederick E. Dillenbeck, M. D.

Frederick E. Dillenbeck, M. D.,of El Dorado, had attained as much prominence in the fleld of medicine and surgery as others of his fantily have gained in the breeding and raising of some of the finest trotting horses known in Kansas or anywhere in the country. Doctor Dilleubeck, who had practiced medicine at El Dorado for twenty years, is local and dispensing surgeou for the Missouri Pacific and the Santa. Fe Railway companies, is consulting surgeon for the Rock Island Railroad Company, is medieal examiner for a number of old line life insurance companies, is a member of the County and State Medical societies, the American Medical Association, the Military Surgeous of the United States, the Clinical Congress of Surgeons of North America and the American Association of Railway Surgeous. He served two terms as coroner of Butler County, and had been county and city physician for several terms. He is not only a capable and painstaking physician with years of succossful practice to his credit, but is a genial and courteous gentleman whose kindly manners have won for him a host of friends in this section of Kansas. Doctor Dillenbeek was born near Gouverneur in St. Lawrence County, New York, April 4, 1867. He is a son of Charles B. and Helen (Visscher) Dillenbeck, Charles B. Dillenbeek is known fan and wide as proprietor of the “City Dairy Farm” at El Dorado, and is one of Kansas men who have gained a national reputation as breeders of staudard trotting horses. Charles B. Dillenbeck was born in Jefferson County, New York, in 1842, a son of Jacob and Catherine...

Biographical Sketch of Myron W. Packard

MYRON W. PACKARD. – This leading citizen of the lower Sound was born in Madrid, St. Lawrence County, New York, in 1830. At the age of twenty-three he left his native place, where he was in the mercantile business, coming as far west as Illinois, and in the same year journeyed on to River Falls, Wisconsin. That was his home for seventeen years, three of which were spent in the Union army, from which he was mustered out as a quartermaster-sergeant. In 1870 he came to Washington Territory, bringing his wife and family of five children, and located on White River, engaging in the mercantile business. Regarding Snohomish a more eligible business point, he removed thither in the summer of 1871, and engaged in the same business until 1879, when he returned to Wisconsin, but was detained no longer than till the year 1882. Returning to our coast he found a location on Skagit river. There he remained until 1885, when he once more went to Snohomish, and with his son in 1887, by purchase and building, opened his present fine store, where he is doing a successful business. Mr. Packard has secured the confidence of the people, and has served the county as probate judge, auditor and treasurer. He was also a member of the first board of trustees of Snohomish, and still holds that position. He is a Republican, and the father of the editor of the well-known journal, The...

Biography of George Monroe Carpenter

George Monroe Carpenter. In those activities which lead to success George M. Carpenter had pursued an undeviating career since early manhood. He is one of the leading bankers, capitalists and business men of Southern Kansas and Northern Oklahoma, and is the founder of the City of Elgin, Kansas, where he resided. He began life in comparatively humble circumstances. He knows what it is to be poor and work hard, and his sympathy had always gone out to the man who is struggling to get ahead. He was born in St. Lawrence County, New York, November 16, 1842. The public schools of his native county gave him his early education, he graduated from the Lawrenceville High School at the age of nineteen, and then spent three years in the Academy at Gonverneur, New York. Leaving school in 1864 be was for several years employed in a flour mill at Lawrenceville. Going west to Clinton County, Iowa, he worked as a farm laborer three years. Mr. Carpenter first came to what is now Elgin, Kansas, in 1872. He became identified with the cattle industry when practically all the southwestern country was a vast cattle range. After coming to Elgin he went back to Iowa, and soon began driving cattle back and forth over the trails from Texas to the north. His second arrival in Elgin was with a bunch of cattle from Texas, For forty years or more Mr. Carpenter had been identified with the cattle business, at one time was among the largest cattle men in the state, and is still interested in that line, though not so extensively as...

Biography of Benjamin A. Jenne

Character and ability will come to the front anywhere. As boy and man, many a man has been buffeted by fortune and had almost insurmountable obstacles thrust in his path, but per-severance has cleared them away and he has gone on to success. Such has been the experience of the subject of this sketch, one of the rising and popular citizens and public men of Bingham County, Idaho, a man with a heart for any venture, and a smile for friend and foe. Benjamin P. Jenne, deputy sheriff and jailer of Bingham County, Idaho, was born at Poor Man’s Gulch, California, October 22, 1855, and is descended from English and French ancestry. His grandfather, Benjamin P. Jenne, was born in France, whence he emigrated to the United States and settled in St. Lawrence County, New York. There his son Benjamin P. Jenne, 2d, was born and reared. He went, while yet a young man, to California, and there married Miss Annie Ann Richardson, who died in giving birth to her only child, the subject of this sketch. Benjamin P. Jenne, 2d, died, aged eighty-seven, in 1894. When he was four years old, Benjamin A. Jenne was taken to Ohio to live with his uncle, Ansel Jenne, and remained there, attending school after he was old enough, until he was twelve. He then went back to St. Lawrence County, New York, where he had a home with relatives, and at fifteen began to earn his own living. For two years he was a sailor on the great lakes between Ogdensburg, New York, and Chicago, Illinois. Then he went into the...

Biography of Chester P. Coburn

Among the well known and highly respected citizens of northern Idaho who have borne an important part in the development of the state is Chester P. Coburn, of Lewiston, whose name is enrolled among the pioneers who came to this section of the country in 1862. He aided in the organization not only of the state but of the territory, and has ever been a prominent factor in the progress and advancement which have wrought a marvelous transformation here. It is a well attested maxim that the greatness of a state lies not in its machinery of government, nor even in its institutions, but in the sterling qualities of its individual citizens, in their capacity for high and unselfish effort and their devotion to the public good. Regarded as a citizen, Mr, Coburn belongs to that public-spirited, useful and helpful type of men whose ambitions and desires are centered and directed in those channels through which flow the greatest and most permanent good to the greatest number, and it is therefore consistent with the purpose and plan of this work that his record be given among those of the representative men of the state. A native of Vermont, Chester P. Coburn was born in Rochester, that state, May 3, 1832. His ancestors were early settlers of New Hampshire and the Green Mountain state, and his grand-fathers, Abraham Coburn and Benjamin Stone, fought for the freedom and independence of the colonies in the Revolutionary war. His father, Thomas Coburn, was a native of New Hampshire, and in early life learned the tanner’s trade, but in later years became a farmer....

Biography of Wallace Fairbank

WALLACE FAIRBANK. – The subject of this sketch is one of the substantial and capable men of Union county, and one who showed the metal of which he was made at the time Columbia called for sons to avenge her insult and to put down the minions of rebellion, at which time he responded and did good service until the work was completed and he was honorably discharged, carrying, however, until this day the serious effects of his service and the wounds that he received. Mr. Fairbank was born in St. Lawrence county, New York on July 27, 1848, being the son of Luther and Nancy (Green) Fairbank. At the early age of ten he started for himself and when he was fifteen years old he enlisted in Company H, First Wisconsin Cavalry, under Colonel Lagrange. In June, 1864, he was detailed to take a wagon train from Nashville, Tennessee, to Atlanta, Georgia, and enroute he was troubled much with guerilla bands, and on one occasion he was prostrated from over exertion, which, with its effects, is present with him, now. While attacking General Wheeler at Spring Hill, he had a horse shot from under him, and in falling the animal crushed the side of our subject, and although he was sent to the hospital, he never recovered his wonted vigor. After his discharge he returned home, and in 1871 went upon an expedition to hunt buffalo, wolf, bear, and so forth, which lasted for three years. Making a good thing from this trapping and hunting expedition, he then turned his attention to farming, taking a homestead in Filmore...

Biographical Sketch of Arthur Nathan Doud

Doud, Arthur Nathan; civil engineer; born, New York, 1872; son of George C. and Martha Dunbar Doud; graduated High School, Winthrop, N. Y., class of 1895; took three years special engineering course at Clarkson Technical School, Potsdam, N. Y., finished there in 1900; married, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 14, 1901, Nellie M. Wilson; two daughters; followed surveying and engineering work in New York state for three years; then engaged on the hydro-electric development on the St. Lawrence River; for two years and nine months member of the engineering corps, War Dept., U. S. Army, as chief of field party on location survey of forks and dams on the Ohio River, and in charge of lock construction until Oct., 1906; was for some time with Westinghouse. Church, Kerr & Co., on the construction of the New York Terminal of The Pennsylvania Rail-road; from Sept. 1, 1911, to the present time, mngr. of the Acme Equipment & Engineering Co., manufacturers of Doud handling equipment; member Cleveland Engineering Society and National Geographical Society; member Brasher Lodge, No. 541, F. & A. M., Brasher Falls, N. Y. Recreation: Hunting. Inventor and patenter of the Doud Steel Buckets and Cars for handling concrete and excavating...

Warren, Mary E. Mrs. – Obituary

Lostine, Wallowa County, Oregon Funeral services were held at the Christian church at Lostine, Friday morning, September 18, at ten o’clock for Mrs. Mary E. Warren, who died at the home of her daughter, Mrs, Jessie Hammack. Rev. Ford of Enterprise conducted the services and internment was in the Wallowa cemetery by the side of two grand-daughters who preceded her in death. Mary E. Warren was born March 6, 1852 in Stockholme, N. Y., and died Sept., 17, 1931 at Lostine at the age of 79 years, 6 months and 11 days. She was married to Mason Sherman Allen at the age of 19 years. To this union four children were born, two of whom are living, Lester Edgar Warren and Mrs. Jessie Hammack, both of Lostine. Mr. Allen died and in 1881 Mrs. Allen married Samuel Warren. Five children were born and all are living. They are: David Warren of Dayton, Wash., James Warren and Samuel Warren of Ontario, Or, Mrs. Maude Whittit, Enterprise and O.P. Warren, Lostine. Besides her seven children she leaves 18 grandchildren. Mary Warren came west in 1888 and has been a resident of Oregon for twenty years. She was a member of the Adventist church for many years. “Grandma” Warren, as she known to her many friends, spent her last years with her daughter Mrs. Hammack. Note: Mary’s maiden name was Mary Elizabeth Harris. Mrs. Hammack was Jessie May Allen, Purinton, Robinson, Hammack. She was the wife of James Lafayette Hammack. Enterprise Record Chieftain, September 24, 1931, Page 6 Contributed by: Sue Wells O. P Warren is Orpheus P. –...
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