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Narrative of Robert Eastburn – Indian Captivities

A Faithful Narrative of the Many Dangers and Sufferings, as well as wonderful and surprising deliverances, of Robert Eastburn, during his late captivity among the Indians. Written by Himself. Published at the earnest request of many persons, for the benefit of the Public. With a recommendatory Preface by the Rev. Gilbert Tennent. Psalms 24, 6, 7, and 193, 2, 4. Philadelphia: Printed. Boston: Reprinted and sold by Green & Russell, opposite the Probate Office in Queen street, 1753. Preface Candid Reader: The author (and subject) of the ensuing narrative (who is a deacon of our church, and has been so for many years) is of such an established good character, that he needs no recommendation of others where he is known; a proof of which was the general joy of the inhabitants of this city, occasioned by his return from a miserable captivity; together with the readiness of divers persons to contribute to the relief of himself and necessitous family, without any request of his, or the least motion of that tendency. But seeing the following sheets are like to spread into many places where he is not known, permit me to say that, upon long acquaintance, I have found him to be a person of candor, integrity, and sincere piety, whose testimony may with safety be depended upon; which give his narrative the greater weight, and may induce to read it with the greater pleasure. The design of it is evidently pious; the matters contained in it and manner of handling them, will, I hope, be esteemed by the impartial to be entertaining and improving. I wish it...

St. Regis Colony, or Band

This community is an off-shoot of the Iroquois stock, but not a member of the confederacy. It originated in the efforts commenced about the middle of the 17th century, by the Roman Catholic church of France, to draw the Iroquois into communion with that church. It was, however, but a part of the public policy, which originated in the reign of Louis XV., to colonize the Iroquois country, and wrest it from the power of the British crown. When this effort failed, replete as it was with wars, intrigues and embassies, battles and massacres, which make it the heroic age of our history, the persons who had become enlisted in the ritual observances of this church, were induced to withdraw from the body of the tribes, and settle on the banks of the St. Lawrence, in the area of the present county of St. Lawrence. It was, in effect, a missionary colony. Its members were mostly Mohawks, from Caughnawaga, with some Oneidas, and perhaps a few of the Onondagas, amongst whom there had been Catholic missions and forts established, at early dates. The exertions made to organize this new canton were, politically considered, at direct variance with the colonial policy of New York, and were therefore opposed by the persons entrusted by the crown with Indian affairs, and also by the councils of the confederacy. Those persons who composed it assimilated in faith, and almost as a necessary consequence, they soon did so in politics.1 They went off in small parties, secretly, and after they had become embodied and located, they were regarded, in effect, as foreign Indians and were...

St. Regis Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The St. Regis Indians are the successors of the ancient Mohawks, and reside on their reservation in Franklin and St. Lawrence counties, New York, which is 7.3 miles long upon the south line and about 3 miles wide, except where purchases made by the state of New York in 1824 and.1825, as indicated on the map, modify the shape. The original tract was estimated as the equivalent of 6 miles square, or 23,040 acres, and the present acreage, computed by official reports without survey, is given as 14,640 acres. Four main roads diverge from the village of Hogansburg, and these are fairly well maintained. Nearly all local roads are poor and little more than trails. The country is practically level, and, in the winter teams move almost at random anywhere over the snow or ice. In the summer boats are in general use and the products of Indian industry find a ready market. The St. Regis river is navigable to the point indicated on the map and communication is maintained with towns on both sides of the national boundary several times a week. At Messena, 12 miles westward, at Helena, 6 miles southwest, and at Fort Covington, 9 miles eastward, are railroad connections with mail facilities 6 days in the week. Nearly the entire tract is tillable, and the greater portion has exceptional fertility. The land is slightly rolling, but nowhere hilly. The supply of water is ample, and in portions of the reservation, where swamps or bog prevent tillage, drainage will be necessary before efficient farming can be done. A large tract of this character, containing fully 1,000...

Reservations of the Six Nations in New York and Pennsylvania, 1723-1890

The accompanying map was prepared in 1771 under the direction of William Tryon, captain general and governor in chief of the province of New York, and is as nearly suggestive of the then recognized boundary of the Six Nations as any that has had official sanction. In 1851 Lewis H. Morgan, assisted by Ely S. Parker, a Seneca chief; and afterward an efficient staff Officer of General Grant, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, prepared a map for a volume entitled League of the Iroquois, which aimed to define the villages, trails, and boundaries of the Five Nations as they existed in 1.720. Indian names were assigned to all lakes, watercourses, and villages, and the various trails from village to village as far as the Ne-ah-ga (Niagara) River. Unfortunately, the work was not stereotyped, and the book itself is a rare possession. Another map, so ancient as to almost crumble at the touch, represents the territory of Michigan as visited by the Five Nations, and by a footnote relates the visit of 80 Ne-car-ri-a-ges, besides men, women, and children, who came from “Misilmackinac” May 30, 1823, asking to be admitted as a seventh nation into the league, just as the Tuscaroras had been adopted as a sixth. It has some data as to “carrying places” which are not upon the Governor Tryon map. The latter has historic value from its description of “the country of the Six Nations, with part of the adjacent colonies”, recognizing at the time the independent relations which they sustained to Great Britain. The vast tract then controlled by the Seneca Indians is clearly defined,...

Biographical Sketch of Horace E. H. Ruggles

The task of educating children of one of the peninsula’s most flourishing cities is the responsibility that falls on Horace E. H. Ruggles, supervising principal of the Burlingame schools. It was not long ago that Burlingame although destined to become one of the county’s leading cities, did not have a single school house within its boundaries. It was shortly after that Mr. Ruggles accepted his present position. With 217 children the Burlingame system was founded. In only three years the number of pupils increased to nearly 500. Burlingame has two handsome, modern, up-to-date school houses of which any community would be justly proud. A recognized feature of the Burlingame school system is the perfect co-operation between the teachers. To bring this about was one of Mr. Ruggles’ first undertakings; and succeeding in that he is now encouraging a closer relationship between the schoolroom and the home through the mutual efforts of the parents and teachers. Mr. Ruggles came to Burlingame well prepared for the responsibilities of his position. After a splendid primary and preparatory school education he attended the Potsdam Normal School in New York. After holding several teaching positions he became principal of the high school at Johnsonburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Ruggles is a native of Vermont. He has lived in California for five...

Biography of Rev. Isaac G. Hubbard

Rev. Isaac G. Hubbard, at one time the rector of Trinity Church, Claremont, was born here, April 13, 1818, son of Isaac and Ruth (Cobb) Hubbard. His grandfather, George Hubbard, who was a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War, came to Claremont in 1778 from Tolland, Conn. Judge J. H. Hubbard, of Windsor, a son of George, was one of the ablest lawyers in New England. He was a powerful man, and as a pleader at the bar he had few equals. Isaac Hubbard, another son, who settled in Claremont, became a successful farmer and stock-raiser. He was an influential man, served in different town offices, did much legal work, was Justice of the Peace, was considered a practical lawyer, and was prominent in the Episcopal church. He died in January, 1861, leaving a fine estate of some four hundred acres. By his first wife, a daughter of Ezra Jones, there was one child, a daughter, who married Charles F. Long, and had four children: Caroline, who died young; Charles H.; Isaac G.; and Charlotte B. The three last named are still living. His second wife, in maidenhood Ruth Cobb, daughter of Samuel Cobb, of Springfield, Vt., had four children. Amos, the eldest, now deceased, who was in the nursery business in Detroit, Mich., married Catharine, daughter of Samuel Fiske. She was half-sister of Philip Fiske, the donor of the Fiske Library in Claremont; and her mother was a sister of Paran Stevens, the famous hotel man of that place. The second child of Isaac Hubbard was Sarah M., who married the Rev. Joel Clapp, an Episcopal minister. Charles H....

Biography of Jesse W. S. Moon

Jesse W. S. Moon, a retired farmer, living in the village of Bradford, was born in Hopkinton, St. Lawrence County, N.Y., August 12, 1845. His parents, Jesse and Sophia (Barker) Moon, are well known in Bradford through their frequent visits to their son. Mr. Moon was reared on a farm, living with his parents until December 30, 1863, when he enlisted for service in the Civil War in the Eleventh New York Cavalry as a recruit, joining his regiment in Washington soon after. He served in the South, mostly in New Orleans. In the spring of 1864 he did guard on various plantations lying along the Mississippi, being for some months at Baton Rouge. He was honorably discharged May 16, 1865, at Memphis, Tenn. Returning to New York State, Mr. Moon was employed on the old homestead for a few years. In December, 1869, he went to Boston to work. While there he bought his present farm in Bradford, of which he took possession in July, 1874. His estate comprises two hundred and fifty acres of tillage and timber land and five hundred acres of pasture. He has carried on mixed farming, paying much attention to dairying, having a fine herd of thirty full-blooded Ayrshire cattle, which he considers the best milk producers. By remodelling and repairing the dwelling, and erecting new and commodious barns and out-buildings, he has made his farm one of the best appointed On January 10, 1867, at Burlington, Vt., Mr. Moon married Miss Susan F. Delano, who was born in Duxbury, Mass., daughter of Melzar P. and Susan F. (English) Delano. Her father, who...

Biography of Captain Harry C. Fay

Captain Harry C. Fay, editor-in-chief of the National Eagle, a bright and thoroughly up-to-date newspaper published in Claremont, was born in Richmond, Vt., November 30, 1830, son of Captain Nathan and Polly (Colby) Fay. Stephen Fay, his great-great-grandfather, was an early settler in Bennington, Vt., and was the father of eight children. His son John kept the Catamount Tavern, which during his day became a meeting-place for many great statesmen, who formed a legislative body, and held there meetings known as “Councils of Safety.” He, John, fell in the battle of Bennington. His son, Nathan Fay, served as a Colonel Warner’s command. Nathan, who was a cloth-dresser by trade, removed from Bennington to Richmond, Vt., about the year 1781, and established there a cloth-dressing house, which he carried on successfully for a number of years, leaving a flourishing business at the time of his death, which occurred at the age of seventy-seven. He married a daughter of Colonel Safford, a member of an old and prominent family of Bennington. Captain Nathan Fay, father of the subject of this sketch, continued the business of clothdressing after the death of his father; but, it subsequently becoming less profitable, he turned his attention in part to farming, and at the time of his death was the owner of one thousand acres of land. A member in early life of the Democratic party, he held office continuously for twenty-five years, representing his town in the legislature at six different periods, and serving it as Selectman throughout his public career. A good penman and a close student, he possessed also a fair knowledge of...

Five Nations Burial Customs

Writing of the Iroquois or Five Nations, during the early years of the eighteenth century, at a time when they dominated the greater part of the present State of New York, it was said: “Their funeral Rites seem to be formed upon a Notion of some Kind of Existence after Death. They make a large round Hole, in which the Body can be placed upright, or upon its Haunches, which after the Body is placed in it, is covered with Timber, to support the Earth which they lay over, and thereby keep the Body free from being pressed; they then raise the Earth in a round Hill over it. They always dress the Corps in all its Finery, and put Wampum and other Things into the Grave with it; and the Relations suffer not Grass or any Weed to grow on the Grave, and frequently visit it with Lamentations.” The circular mound of earth over the grave was likewise mentioned a century earlier, having been seen at the Oneida village which stood east of the present Munnsville, Madison County, New York. “Before we reached the castle we saw three graves, just like our graves in length and height,; usually their graves are round. These graves were surrounded with palisades that they had split from trees, and they were closed up so nicely that it was a wonder to see. They were painted with red and white and black paint; but the chief’s grave had an entrance, and at the top of that was a big wooden bird, and all around were painted dogs and deer and snakes, and other...

Biography of Francis A. McCarty

Francis A. McCarty was one of the most remarkably successful business men who ever resided in Douglas County. He was born in Schuyler County, New York, April 23, 1837, and died at his home in Filson, May 14, 1899. He was a son of John and Laura (Frost) McCarty, natives of New England. Charles McCarty, brother of Joseph McCarty, was born at Morristown, New Jersey, in 1776, and died in Montour, Schuyler County. New York, November 15, 1858, in his eighty-third year. Joseph McCarty (grandfather) was the father of John, Charles, William and David, was born January 9, 1778, and died July 25. 1845. His wife, Mary Harnerd McCarty, was born August 15, 1774, and died January 20, 1846. John McCarty (father), son of Joseph, was born May 15, 1805, and died January 14. 1875. Joseph Frost (grandfather) was born June 4, 1797, married Sallie McCarty, and died October 27, 1847. He was a son of Joseph Frost, a soldier of the Revolution, who was burn May 22, 1754, and died May 28, 1844, at Catherine, New York. He married Lucy Couch, a daughter of Jonathan Couch, who was married September 19, 1781, died April 8, 1843, and was buried at Catherine, New York. Appended herewith is a certificate from the Adjutant General’s office of the state of Connecticut: “Hartford, September 11, 1895. This is to certify that Joseph Frost (grandfather of Francis A. McCarty) served in the war of the Revolution, and the following is his service according to the records of this office ; Private in Colonel Benjamin Hinman’s regiment. Discharged in northern department September 11, 1775....
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