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Manahoac Indians

Manahoac Tribe: Meaning “They are very merry,” according to Tooker (1895), but this seems improbable. Also called: Mahocks, apparently a shortened form. Manahoac Connections. The Manaboac belonged to the Siouan linguistic family; their nearest connections were probably the Monacan, Moneton, and Tutelo. Manahoac Location. In northern Virginia between the falls of the rivers and the mountains east and west and the Potomac and North Anna Rivers north and south. Manahoac Subdivisions. Subtribes or tribes of the confederacy as far as known were the following: Hassinunga, on the headwaters of the Rappahannock River. Manahoac proper, according to Jefferson (1801), in Stafford and Spottsylvania Counties. Ontponea, in Orange County. Shackaconia, on the south bank of the Rappahannock River in Spottsylvania County. Stegaraki, on the Rapidan River in Orange County. Tanxnitania, on the north side of the upper Rappahannock River in Fauquier County. Tegninateo, in Culpeper County, at the head of the Rappahannock River. Whonkentia, in Fauquier County, near the head of the Rappahannock. Manahoac Villages: Mahaskahod, on the Rappahannock River, probably near Fredericksburg, is the only town known by name. Manahoac History. Traditional evidence points to an early home of the Manahoac people in the Ohio Valley. In 1608 John Smith discovered them in the location above given and learned that they with the Monacan but at war with the Powhatan Indians and the Iroquois (or perhaps rather the Susquehanna). After this they suddenly vanish from history under a certainly recognizable name, but there is good reason to believe that they were one of those tribes which settled near the falls of the James River in 1654 or 1656 and defeated...

Biographical Sketch of Thomas Waller

Thomas Waller, of Spottsylvania Co., Va., was born in July, 1732, and his wife, Sarah Dabney, was born in October, 1 740. They had nine children-Mary, Anna, Agnes, Dolly, Carr, Dabney, Comfort, Elizabeth, and John. Carr married Elizabeth Martin, by whom he had Sarah M., William I., Joseph G., and Martha M. Sarah M. married Henry Edwards. William I. married Maria Norval. Joseph G. married Virginia McDonnell, and settled in Warren Co., Mo., in 1830. They had nine children-Susan, Martha, Agnes, Jane, Collin, John, Louisa, Joseph, and Eliza, Martha M. Waller married Henry Pritchett, who settled in Missouri in 18:35. Their children were Carr W., Lizzie, Sarah, William I., Julia D., Joseph H., John F., Martha P., Edwin, and Mary E. Joseph H. is a distinguished Methodist minister, and Carr W., principal of Pritchett Institute at Glasgow, Mo., is one of the most highly educated men in the State. The Waller and Pritchett families are well educated and intelligent, and exercise a large influence for good in their respective...

Manahoac Tribe

Manahoac Indians (Algonquian: ‘they are very merry.’ – Tooker). A confederacy or group of small tribes or bands possibly Siouan, in north Virginia, in 1608, occupying the country from the falls of the rivers to the mountains and from the Potomac to North Anna river. They were at war with the Powhatan and Iroquois, and in alliance with the Monacan, but spoke a language different from any of their neighbors.  Among their tribes Smith mentions the Manahoac, Tanxnitania, Shackaconia, Ontponea, Tegninateo, Whonkenti, Stegaraki, and Hassinunga, and says there were others.  Jefferson confounded them with the Tuscarora.  Mahaskahod is the only one of their villages of which the name has been preserved.  Others may have borne the names of the tribes of the confederacy.  The Mahocks mentioned by Lederer in 1669 seem to be identical to them. Manahoac Tribe. A tribe or band of the Manahoac group.  According to Jefferson they lived on Rappahannock river in Stafford and Spottsylvania Counties, Va. For Further Study The following articles and manuscripts will shed additional light on the Manahoac as both an ethnological study, and as a people. Mooney, Siouan Tribes of the East, 18, 1894....

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