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The Mudd Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

The influential farmer, James Duncan Mudd of Prairie du Rocher, is a member of the oldest family of settlers in Randolph County. Indeed, his family has been in America since the very earliest days, having come over to Maryland in the time of Lord Baltimore. This band of stout-hearted Englishmen set out from their native shores in 1633 and sought religious freedom in the new world. They established the Church in North America and guaranteed religious liberty, where until then there had been only Puritan fanaticism. The Mudd family were original settlers of this colony. After the Revolution, when the tide of westward emigration set in, Thomas Mudd and his wife Johanna Carrick Mudd, proceeded to Kentucky, where they were among the earliest settlers. They settled in Spencer County. This Thomas Mudd had seven sons and two daughters, the third son being Francis. Francis Mudd was born in 1795 in Maryland, emigrated from there to Kentucky with his parents, and there grew to manhood, with such slight educational advantages as the wilderness afforded. In the War of 1812 he volunteered, and served throughout the war. He was with Jackson at New Orleans when that great general with his regiments of stalwart pioneers won one of the most brilliant victories that we ever achieved over the British. On his return he was married in 1819 to Louisa Dough, and three years later moved to Randolph County. Thus the family had been among the very first settlers of three states, Maryland, Kentucky and Illinois. Francis Mudd claimed a farm in Section 29, Township 5, Range 8, and lived here the peaceful...

Slave Narrative of Barney Stone

Interviewer: Robert C. Irvin Person Interviewed: Barney Stone Location: Noblesville, Indiana Place of Birth: Spencer County, Kentucky Date of Birth: May 17, 1847 Age: 91 (about) Robert C. Irvin District #2 Noblesville, Ind. EX-SLAVE, LIFE STORY OF BARNEY STONE, FORMER SLAVE, HAMILTON CO. This is the life story of Barney Stone, a highly respected colored gentleman of Noblesville, Hamilton County seat. Mr. Stone is near nintey-one years old, is in sound physical condition and still has a remarkable memory. He was a slave in the state of Kentucky for more than sixteen years and a soldier in the Union army for nearly two years. He educated himself and taught school to colored children four years following the Civil War. He studied in 1868, and has been a preacher in the Colored Baptist Faith for sixty nine years, having been instrumental in the building of seven churches in that time. Mr. Stone joined the K. of P. Lodge, the I.O.O.F. and Masonic Lodge and is still a member of the latter. This fine old colored man has always worked hard for the uplift and advancement of the colored race and has accomplished much in this effort in the States of Tennessee, Kentucky and Indiana. He, together with his preaching of the gospel, and his lecturing, has followed farming. He now has a field of sweet corn and a fine, large garden, which he plowed, planted and tended himself and not a weed can be found in either. He is the only ex-slave now living in Hamilton County, the others all deceased, and is one of three living members of Hamilton...

Slave Narrative of Thomas Lewis

Interviewer: Estella R. Dodson Person Interviewed: Thomas Lewis Location: North Summit Street, Bloomington, Indiana Place of Birth: Spencer County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1857 Submitted by: Estella R. Dodson District #11 Monroe County Bloomington, Ind. October 4, 1937 INTERVIEW WITH THOMAS LEWIS, COLORED North Summit Street, Bloomington, Ind. I was born in Spencer County, Kentucky, in 1857. I was born a slave. There was slavery all around on all the adjoining places. I was seven years old when I was set free. My father was killed in the Northern army. My mother, step-father and my mother’s four living children came to Indiana when I was twelve years old. My grandfather was set free and given a little place of about sixteen acres. A gang of white men went to my grandmother’s place and ordered the colored people out to work. The colored people had worked before for white men, on shares. When the wheat was all in and the corn laid by, the white farmers would tell the colored people to get out, and would give them nothing. The colored people did not want to work that way, and refused. This was the cause of the raids by white farmers. My mother recognized one of the men in the gang and reported him to the standing soldiers in Louisville. He was caught and made to tell who the others were until they had 360 men. All were fined and none allowed to leave until all the fines were paid. So the rich ones had to pay for the poor ones. Many of them left because all were made responsible...

Slave Narrative of Susan Dale Sanders

Interviewer: Byer York Person Interviewed: Susan Dale Sanders Location: Louisville, Kentucky Place of Birth: Spencer County KY Place of Residence: #1 Dupree Alley, Louisville, Kentucky The following is a story of Mrs. Susan Dale Sanders, #1 Dupree Alley, between Breckinridge and Lampton Sts., Louisville, an old Negro Slave mammy, and of her life, as she related it. “I lived near Taylorsville, Kentucky, in Spencer County, nearly all my life, ‘cept the last fo’ or five yea’s I’se been livin’ here. I was bo’n there in a log cabin, it was made of logs, and it was chinked with clay and rock. My Mammy, was raised from a baby by her master, Rueben Dale. He was a good ole Master, and was alway’s good to my Mammy. Master Dale owned a big farm and had big fields of co’n an’ tobacco, and we raised everything we had to eat. Ole master Dale was a good ole baptist, had lots of good ole time relig’n. Ruben Dale had lots of slaves, and every family had its own cabin. As he raised my Mammy as a slave from a baby, she thought there was none livin’ bett’r than her master Dale. The next fa’m close to the Masters, was owned by a man, Colonel Jack Allen, and he had a big fa’m and owned lots of slaves. And Mammy was allowed to marry one of the Allen slaves, and my father’s name was Will Allen. You see the slaves had the same name as the Master’s, as he owned ’em. My Mammy had seven children and we all grow’d up on our...

Spencer County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Spencer County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Spencer County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Spencer County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Spencer County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Spencer County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Spencer County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Spencer County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Spencer County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1840 Spencer County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Spencer County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1850 Spencer County, Kentucky Census Images $ 1850 Spencer County, Kentucky Slave Schedule $ Hosted at Spencer County USGenWeb Archives Project Census Index Census Index File 1 Of 3 Census Index File 2 Of 3 Census Index File 3 Of 3 Census File 1 Of 5 Census File 2 Of 5 Census File 3 Of 5 Census File...

Spencer County, Kentucky Cemetery Records

Spencer County Spencer County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Spencer County USGenWeb Archives Project Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery , Partial Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery , Partial Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery , Partial Hedges Cemetery Little Union Baptist Church Cemetery Pioneer Cemetery , Notes Graves located on Milligan Farm Old Taylorsville Cemetery Valley Cemetery Spencer County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Spencer County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Spencer County Cemetery Books Headstones of the Collings/McMichael Family Bethlehem Baptist Cemetery Elk Creek Baptist Church Cemetery , Partial Briar Ridge Christian Church Cemetery , Partial Spencer County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Horsin’ Around Kentucky The Old Taylorsville Cemetery Spencer County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Tombstone Transcription Project Gunterman-Troutman-Kester Cemetery Hedden Cemetery Little Mount Church Cemetery Mt. Eden Christian Church Cemetery Tombstones at Mt. Moriah Cemetery Stodghill Family Graveyard...

Biography of Caleb Reed

Caleb Reed, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Ashmore; was born in Spencer Co., Ky., Dec. 1, 1818, and was 11 years old when he came to Coles Co.; his father, Thomas Reed, was a native of Pennsylvania; removed to Kentucky with his parents when a boy, and there married Miss Anna Kirkham, a native of Kentucky, and the 18t of December, 1829, left that State with his family, consisting of a wife and five children, to found a new home in the wilderness of Illinois. They came with a five-horse team, the journey consuming nearly a month; arriving in Edgar Co., they spent a few days, and about New Year’s, 1830, came to Coles Co., and settled on the farm now owned by his son Caleb Reed; he entered quite a tract of land, owning at one time about a thousand acres. He was a strong Whig, although he never sought to lead or hold office; he was a quiet, industrious man, attending strictly to his own affairs; conservative in his operations, not given to speculation; a man who enjoyed in an eminent degree the esteem of his neighbors and townsmen; he died in December, 1854, leaving four children, three of whom are living. Caleb Reed, the only living son, has always resided on the homestead; like his father, he has never sought official positions, his farm of 430 acres requiring his entire attention. He was married Feb. 22, 1844, to Miss Jane Carter, a daughter of John and Mary Carter; she was born in Wayne Co., Ky., Dec. 15, 1824, and came to Coles Co. with her parents...

Biographical Sketch of James M. Miller

James M. Miller, dealer in dry goods, boots and shoes, clothing and furnishing goods, Charleston; has been a citizen and merchant of Charleston for more than forty years, being the oldest merchant now doing business in the city; he was born in Spencer Co., Ky., Aug. 29, 1814; he is a son of John H. and Jane Miller, the former a native of Virginia, and the latter of Pennsylvania; he was raised on a farm and followed the occupation of farming until 1838, when he came to Charleston and engaged in general merchandising, having visited the State and purchased land in Bond Co. two years before; he has continued in the mercantile business to the present time, with the exception of one year which he spent in the cattle business in Wisconsin; although Mr. Miller has passed through several seasons of financial depression, and has himself suffered some reverses of fortune, his mercantile career has, upon the whole, been a prosperous one; he has always paid dollar for dollar, and has a comfortable competency remaining; he has done much to improve the city, having built several stores and dwellings, expending no less than $30,000 in improvements; he was the first of the Charleston merchants to purchase goods in New York City, which he did for the first time in 1841. He has served two terms in the City Council. He was married April 7, 1842, to Helen E. Walker of Charleston, a native of Kentucky; she died July 24, 1851, leaving one daughter-Mary F. (now Mrs. A. C. Stallard, of Shelby Co., Ky.). Mr. Miller was married again Aug....

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