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Biography of Mrs. Caroline (Watson) Dickinson

Mrs. Caroline (Watson) Dickinson, the widow of William R. Dickinson, is the daughter of Daniel and Rowena (Bartlett) Watson. Her father was born in North Carolina in 1797 and the mother in Missouri in 1802, where they married and lived until 1820, when they crossed over to Fulton County, Kentucky, and lived there until they died. They had eight children, two boys and six girls. Her mother was a devout Methodist; her father, an energetic farmer, and a democrat, and died in 1865; the mother died in 1869. Mrs. Dickinson was born April 6, 1823, being the first child born in Madrid Bend, Kentucky She had fine educational advantages, and spent two years under Mrs.Tevis, the principal of “Science Hill,” at Shelbyville, Kentucky, for a great many years the largest and best female college in the South. In 1843 she married William R. Dickinson, a native of Missouri. He was a graduate of Cape Girardeau College, of Missouri. He taught school for some time, and his wife was a pupil of his. He then went into the mercantile business at Vicksburg, Mississippi, but, the firm failing, he took his remnant of the goods, put them on a steamboat, and, going up the river, landed at Mr. Watson’s, where, meeting his old pupil, Miss Caroline Watson, again, their friendship was renewed, and before He left they were married. Soon after they went to Rockport, Indiana, and he sold goods there; then returned near his father-in-law’s and died in 1858. He was both a Mason and an Odd Fellow, and in politics a Whig. Since his death Mrs. Dickinson has been...

Biography of Richard A. Rouse

RICHARD A. ROUSE. Many of the farmers of Baxter County, Arkansas, have led such quiet, unobtrusive lives as to be seldom heard of outside of their own township. They are doing fine work in their own community, but do not care to come more prominently before the public, and devote all their time and energies to the cultivation of their farms and the development of the resources of their community. Such men deserve more credit than they ordinarily receive, and we are glad here to present one of them in the person of Richard A. Rouse, who is one of the prominent and worthy citizens of Baxter County, and has a fine farm in Buck Horn Township. He is a native of Crawford County, Indiana, where he was born January 20, 1842, a son of Granville and Ray Jane (White) Rouse, who were Kentuckians by birth, the former a native of Boone County. The father was a son of Moses Rouse and he a son of Michael Rouse. Being of a rather roving disposition he successively moved from Kentucky to Crawford County, Indiana, then to Van Buren County, Iowa, where he remained one year, then went back to Crawford County, Indiana, where his wife died. Soon after the death of his wife, in order to have his three children cared for, he returned to his father in Bullitt County, Kentucky, where he was married to Byronette Owens (who is now also dead). To their union was given one son, John G. He then moved to Daviess County, Kentucky, but is now residing in McLean County, Kentucky, with his son,...

Biography of William Paxton Hazen

William Paxton Hazen, who died at Chetopa, Kansas, April 16, 1909, was for many years a successful Kansas banker. His widow, Mrs. Addie (Glass) Hazen, who survives him, is widely known in women’s circles in Kansas, and is especially active in charitable and philanthropic enterprises in her home city. Mr. Hazen died when at the high tide of his usefulness. He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, July 10, 1858. His father, David Hazen, was a lawyer by profession, practiced for many years in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, but died in Erie, Kansas. Mr. Hazen’s maternal grandmother, Mary Ewing, had her pew in the First Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh for more than forty years. She was the wife of Judge Ewing, a very prominent attorney of Western Pennsylvania. Mr. Hazen on his mother’s side is also a descendant of Roger Williams of colonial history. William P. Hazen was educated in the public schools of Pittsburgh, and after reaching manhood his parents came west to Otley, Iowa, and while in that state he attended the Agricultural College at Ames. On leaving school he came to Cherryvale, Kansas, in 1880, and from there to Thayer. He was cashier of a bank in Thayer until 1887, and then helped to build and organize the Farmers and Merchants Bank at Erie, Kansas, in which he held the post of cashier until 1893. After that for three years he was connected with the National Bank of Pittsburg, Kansas, and then for a year was in the brokerage business at Baltimore, Maryland. Returning to Kansas and locating at Arkansas City he was appointed assistant bank commissioner for the...

Hammack, J. W. Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. J. W. Hammack, one of the best known of Wallowa an Union county pioneers, died at her home at Lostine, Friday night, June 3, 1927 at the age of 84 years, 7 months and 17 days. Sarah Miller was born in Spencer county, Indiana, Oct., 17, 1842. In 1856 she was united in marriage to J. W. Hammack who passed away Oct. 15, 1912. She united with the Christian church when about 19 years of age and remained a faithful member until her death. About ten years ago she had a severe stroke of paralysis, from which she never fully recovered, although she was able to help herself and do the work at her own little home. She took great pleasure in visiting her daughters who live in Lostine. About five years ago she suffered a second stroke, which left her more feeble. On May 6, of this year she became ill with flu and had been almost bedfast ever since. Friday morning about ¬†5 o’clock¬†she had a third stroke from which she never rallied. She was greatly loved by all who knew her, and every child in the community was her favorite. Her death has cast the whole community in gloom. She had lived in the Lostine community for 27 years, and was an eastern Oregon pioneer, having come to Union county in 1867. In the spring of 1866 the family came across the plains to Oregon with an ox team, arriving six later at Lafayette, in the Willamette valley, where they lived for a while when they moved to Union county, settling near Summerville. Grandma Hammack,...

Hammack, Sarah Miller Mrs. – Obituary

Far Home Calls Pioneer Woman Mrs. J. W. Hammack, one of the best known of Wallowa an Union county pioneers, died at her home at Lostine, Friday night, June 3, 1927 at the age of 84 years, 7 months and 17 days. Sarah Miller was born in Spencer County, Indiana, Oct., 17, 1842. In 1856 she was united in marriage to J. W. Hammack who passed away Oct. 15, 1912. She united with the Christian church when about 19 years of age and remained a faithful member until her death. About ten years ago she had a severe stroke of paralysis, from which she never fully recovered, although she was able to help herself and do the work at her own little home. She took great pleasure in visiting her daughters who live in Lostine. About five years ago she suffered a second stroke, which left her more feeble. On May 6, of this year she became ill with flu and had been almost bedfast ever since. Friday morning about 5 o’clock she had a third stroke from which she never rallied. She was greatly loved by all who knew her, and every child in the community was her favorite. Her death has cast the whole community in gloom. She had lived in the Lostine community for 27 years, and was an eastern Oregon pioneer, having come to Union county in 1867. In the spring of 1866 the family came across the plains to Oregon with an ox team, arriving six later at Lafayette, in the Willamette valley, where they lived for a while when they moved to Union...

Biographical Sketch of George W. Baker

George W. Baker, farmer; P. O. Charleston; the subject of this sketch was born in Philadelphia, Penn., May 30, 1824. He married Miss Susan Bell Aug. 26, 1846; she was born in Floyd Co., Ind., March 12, 1830, and died March 9, 1863; they had six children, three living, viz., George B., Win. A. and John V.; his present wife was Mrs. Shaw, formerly Miss Jane Hancock; they were married Oct. 19, 1863; she was born in Floyd Co., Ind., Jan. 17, 1830; she had by former marriage five children, two living, viz., Flora J. Shaw and Sarah E. Shaw. He lived in Philadelphia about fourteen years, when, with his parents, he moved to Floyd Co., Ind., where his father engaged at his trade of shoemaking; he lived there until 1859, when he went to Spencer Co., Ind., and engaged in farming, remaining six years; he then returned to Floyd Co., and, after remaining two years, he came to Illinois and settled on his present place, and has lived here since; he owns 308 acres in this county, which he has earned by his own labor and management. His parents, Stephen and Mary Edwards Baker, were natives of Philadelphia and Maryland; they were married in Philadelphia; in 1837, they moved to Indiana and settled in Flood Co. where they...

Biography of Aaron Jacob Lesh

A. J. Lesh at different stages in his career had been a successful teacher, merchant, pharmacist, physician and oil refiner. He is now head of the Lesh Oil Refining Company of Arkansas City, and through his business energy and activities had contributed one of the most important local industries to this section of Southern Kansas. Mr. Lesh had been a resident of Kansas for over thirty years. For a man who had done so much on his own account it is natural that Mr. Lesh should take justifiable pride and interest in his line of worthy American ancestors. His lineage goes back to Germany. Either before or shortly after coming to America they identified themselves with that splendid sect of people known as Moravians or German Moravian, and subsequent generations of the family were Dunkards. Mr. Lesh is in the seventh generation of the family in America. Going back to the immigrant, we find him in Balthasar Loesch, as the name was spelled in its German form and as it was retained through several generations in this country. Balthasar Loesch and his wife, Susan R. Loesch, lived at Gensheim, Germany, near Worms. In 1710, not long after the close of the thirty years war, they were part of a German colony sent to America by Queen Ann. They settled in the Province of New York in 1713. There were two sons of record in the family of Balthasar Loesch: John Adam Loesch and John George Loesch. About 1723 these two sons moved to Tolpehocken District in Berks County, Pennsylvania. John George Loesch, son of Balthasar, was born in Gensheim,...

Biography of Early Whitten Poindexter

Early Whitten Poindexter. On January 8, 1854, there was born on a farm in Martin County, Indiana, near the village with the euphonious name of Loogootee, a boy whose destiny soon took him away from his father’s fields and livestock and in 1885 brought him to Kansas, where now for more than thirty years he has been general agent for Kansas of the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company. He is recognized as one of the ablest life insurance men of the country. He is one of the leaders in the force of men who are regarded as the most aggressive in any line of business and whose work in the aggregate has been a factor in making the Northwestern Mutual one of the strongest companies in the country. Mr. Poindexter took to life insurance with a readiness and with results that indicated that his talents were not misapplied and as a result of hard and intelligent work and upright methods of doing business has found a success in that field beyond what he might have expected in any profession or other commercial line of endeavor. An eminent American authority has declared that the finest and most virile qualities of American people have been preserved in the mountain districts of Eastern Tennessee and Kentucky. It was in Eastern Tennessee that Mr. Poindexter’s parents were both born, and the respective families probably had lived there for several generations. His parents were Christian and Lourinda (Keck) Poindexter. From the mountains of Tennessee they emigrated to Indiana, and the father acquired 320 acres of land which he devoted to general farming, and he...

Biographical Sketch of Harshbarger, C. M.

Harshbarger, C. M. County Clerk, first came to Russell in the fall of 1870. He engaged in farming which occupation he still follows. He owns one-half section of land, raises stock and cultivates about 110 acres of his farm, was elected County Clerk in 1873, and by re-election has held that office ever since, excepting from 1878 to 1880, (one term.) During the interval he was out of above office he was Township Trustee. He is the first settler in Russell County, and located on the first land by a squatter’s right. He has seen many of the variations in pioneer life on the Great Plains. He was born in Spencer County, Ind., in 1841, moved to Keokuk County, Iowa with parents in 1850, where he lived until he came to Kansas. He was raised on a farm, consequently continues an interest in that substantial occupation. He enlisted in 1861, in Company K, Second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and participated in all the battles of his command; mustered out in July 1865, was married in 1876, to Miss E. J. Haling, a native of Fayette County, Iowa. They have four children; Charles B., Selma C., Clara E. and Grace A. He is a member of Russell Lodge No. 119, I. O. O. F. Deputy Clerk of the District Court for the past two...

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