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The Shinnecock, Poosepatuck, And Montauk Indians, In New York

The report of the special committee appointed by the assembly of New York in 1888 to investigate the Indian problem of that state, made February 1, 1889, contained the following in relation to the Shinnecock, Poosepatuck, and Montauk Indians: The Shinnecock Reservation The Shinnecock Reservation is located on a neck of land running into Shinnecock Bay, near Southampton, on Long island. When the whites discovered the island 13 Indian tribes occupied the land, one of which was the Shinnecock, claiming the territory from Canoe Place to Easthampton, including Sag Harbor and the whole south shore of Peconic Bay. All the Long Island Indians were subject to the Mohawks and paid tribute to them. They were much more peaceful and less aggressive than the Iroquois, and never formed any general conspiracy against their white neighbors. They are supposed to be descendants of the Mohegans and spoke the language of the Delawares. They formerly held a lease of their lands, about 3,600 acres, for 1,000 years, from trustees of the common land of Southampton, but under an act of the legislature of 1859 they acquired the fee to about 400 acres, giving up the remainder. They also have a claim to and are in possession of 50 acres of woodland in the same town, purchased by the tribe many years ago, which their trustees assumed to sell to one Benjamin Carpenter, about 1883, and which sale they allege to be invalid, owing to lack of authority in the trustees of the tribes to sell their land. The people dwelling here called Indians number about 150, 60 males and 90 females. Upon...

Will of Jonas Bower, – 1670

JONAS BOWER, Southampton. Leaves to son Joseph seventeen acres of land at Flying Point, and three acres in the last Division to be taken at the east end next to Robert Woolley’s, one half my meadow on the beach, one half my meadow in Quaganantuck, a £50 right in the ox pasture, and a £50 right of Comnionage. To son James his portion in cattle. “I leave it to my wife’s liberty to pay to my son Jonathan his portion as she shall see meet.” Leaves to wife Hannah use of house and land till son Jonah comes of age. If he die under age, then to go to my son Isaac. If Jonah lives, then Isaac is to have thirty-one acres of land lying by Thomas Halsey’s. Mentions daughters (not named). Makes “my cousin John Howell, Richard Post and John Jessup executors. Dated November 13, 1670. Witnesses, John Howell, John Jessup. Proved June 6, 1671. LIBER 1-2, page...

Will of John Woodruff, – 1670

JOHN WOODRUFF, Southampton, L. I. Leaves to his eldest son, John Woodruff, of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, “a half Crown Piece, in full of all portions and patrimony to be expected of me.” To daughter Anne Woolley, £20. To daughter Elizabeth Dayton, £20. Leaves rest of estate to wife Ann and youngest son John Woodruff,and makes them executors. Dated May 4, 1670. Witnesses, Christopher Foster, John Laughton. Know all men by this, that the above written will ~s of my own handwriting, and I saw ye said John Woodruff sett to his marke, and take off ye seale or stamp from ye wax. As witness my hand. John Laughton. Proved at Court of Sessions at Southold, July 1, 1670. Inventory made May 24, 1670, amounts to £122 7s. 8d. “One half of ye Land and Housing and accommodations is already clearly by deed of Gift disposed to his son John, the other half we apprize at £55. John Howell, Henry Pierson, Edward Howell, John Jennings. [NOTE— John Woodruff married Anne, daughter of John Gosmer, one of the original “Undertakers” of Southampton. He adopted his oldest grandson John Woodrwff, and went to New Jersey about 1660. John Woodruff Sr., also named his youngest son John. He remained in Southampton. His homestead was purchased in 1726 by Francis Pelletrean, and was standing till recent years. It was the last house on Long Island that retained the old-fashioned rhomboidal panes of glass, and was known as the “House with diamond windows.”] LIBER 1-2, page...

Will of John White, – 1670

JOHN WHITE, Southampton, L. I. Leaves to only son John all houses and lands. “If he die without issue then to my daughter Elizabeth. If she die without issue then to my wife Hannah, for life, and then to the eldest son of my brother James White. If he die without issue then one half to my two nephews, John Topping and Thomas Topping. The other half to be divided amongst my four youngest sisters” [not named]. Wife to have use of property till son comes of age. Makes wife Hannah executrix, and “my loving friends, Francis and Daniel Sayre, and my brother-in-law, Thomas Topping” over-seers and guardian of children. Dated May 9, 1670. Witnesses, Thomas Cooper, Thomas Cooper, Jr. The execution of will was comfirmed May 30, 1670, before us, Henry Pierson, John Jessop, Richard Howell, Isaac Halsey. “Thomas Topping of Southampton, testifyes that the will is, and was, the very will of John White, deceased, and that hee, this deponent, wrote ye said will for him, and see him sign and seale ye same, as is also testifyed by ye other witnesses, July 1, 1670. Henry Pierson, Clerk of Court of Sessions.” Inventory taken by John Howell, Henry Pierson, Edward Howell, John Jennings. House and £50; allotment, £55. LIBER 1-2, page...

Will of William Ludlum – 1655

WILLIAM LUDLAM, Southampton. Leaves to his son Anthony “all my housing and lands at the old ground,” and a £50 right of commonage in town of Southampton. Leaves to his son Joseph “my new dwelling-house with two acres of land adjoining, and thirty acres of land adjoining to the mill and mill pond, on the east side of the mill river; and a £50 right of commonage.” Leaves legacies to daughters Grace, Frances, and Mary, also to “eldest child of my son William,” “my son Henry’s child,” “my daughter Grace’s child,” and to “the eldest child of my danghter Frances.” Mentions “a covenant between me and Samuel Davis” concerning use of land. Makes his son Henry executor, and he is to build up the mill, and he is to have half the mill, and his brother Joseph the other half. Also leaves to Henry thirty-six acres of land at the head of the mill pond. Dated April ye 27, 1665. Witnesses, John Howell, John Cooper. Proved at the Court of Assizes, November 2, 1667. [NOTE.—William Ludlam came from Matlock, in Derbyshire, Eng., and was in Southampton as early as 1653. His eldest son, William, went to Huntington, L. I., and died there in 1668.—W. S. P.] Quietus granted to HENRY LUDLAM, of Southampton, as executor of will of his father, William Ludlam, October 5, 1666. LIBER 1-2, page...

Will of Thomas Sayre – 1671

THOMAS SAYRE, Southampton. “In the Name of God, Amen. I, Thomas Sayre, of Southampton upon Long Island, being in perfect strength of memory, blessed bee ye Lord for it, but weake in Body.” Leaves to son Francis two acres of land “next unto his owne in Captains Neck, in ye Great Playne, and 2 acres more lying in ye 8 acre Lots in ye said Great Playne,” also “a Pewter flagon, a Pewter bowl and a great Pewter Platter.” To son Daniel “2 acres of land lying next ye above said 2 acres, in ye 8 acre lots, and 3 acres more in the Ten acre Lots, and one great Pewter Platter.” To son Joseph £40 Stirling, £1U a year, “to begin five years after my decease, to be paid in good merchantable shoes, or other pay that will procure hides towards his setting up a Tannery.” To daughter Damoris Atwater, 40s. To daughter Mary Price 40s. To daughter Hannah Sayre, £20 at the day of her marriage, or when eighteen. Leaves household goods to sons Job and Joseph and daughter Hannah. Makes son Job executor. Dated September 6, 1669. Witnesses, Obadiah Rogers, John Laughton. Inventory taken by John Howell, Henry Pierson, Thomas Cooper and John Jennings, July 10, 1670, mentions “Housing, lands and Tan vats” £150. [NOTE.—The house of Thomas Sayre is still standing in Southampton, and is now the oldest dwelling in the State.] LIBER 1-2, page...

Will of Thurston Raynor – 1667

THURSTON RAYNOR, Southampton. “I, Thurston Raynor, being in perfect memory, yet stricken in age, and not knowing how long my dayes shall continue in this world, do make this my last will and testament.” Leaves to son Joseph 28 acres of land “coming to me from the Towne,” upon the last Division, which is already laid out to his own proportion in said Division. To son Jonathan one-half of all housing and lands, when he comes to the age of twenty-one. Leaves to wife, Martha, the use of the other half for life, and then to go to his son Jonathan. Leaves £10 each “to my other five children” (not named). Makes wife sole executrix, and “request my dear friends, namely my brother-in-law Samuel Clarke and my cousin Mr. John Howell to be overseers of my will.” Dated July 6, 1667. Witnesses, John Howell, Henry Pierson. Proved November 4, 1667. LIBER 1-2, page...

Biography of Jeremiah Hampton Squires

Jeremiah Hampton Squires. One of the old and honored residents of Topeka, to which city he came thirty-seven years ago, is Jeremiah Hampton Squires, veteran of the Civil war, who is now living in comfortable retirement after a long and useful career as a business man and public official. Mr. Squires was born at Southampton, on Long Island, New York, September 11, 1842, and is the only survivor of the four children of Jeremiah and Phoebe (Jaegger) Squires, who were farming people. Mr. Squires resided on the home farm on Long Island until reaching the age of seventeen years, and during this time acquired his education by attending the public schools and Southampton Academy. In the spring of 1860 he went to Columbus, Ohio, and, with the exception of the time he was a soldier in the Civil war, remained in the employ of one man at carpentering, as an apprentice, journeyman, foreman and partner, for nearly twenty years. Mr. Squires enlisted July 22, 1862, as a private in Company A, Ninety-fifth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and within two weeks of the time he was enlisted was engaged in his first battle, at Richmond, Kentucky. In this engagement twenty-seven men of his company were killed or wounded, and here he received his first and only wound during the war which consisted of a bullet in the left hand. He, with 600 others of his regiment, was here captured and paroled for ninety days. He was then declared exchanged and rejoined his regiment, going into active service at Milliken’s Bend, in April, 1863, and being subsequently set to work digging...

Biography of George Rogers Howell

GEORGE ROGERS HOWELL AMONG those Albanians who have devoted their time and talents more exclusively to the pursuits of scientific, linguistic and literary research a man who ranks high among American scholars, is Mr. George R. Howell of the state library. Born in the town of Southampton, Long Island, on the 15th of June, 1833, he passed his boyhood in that interesting locality. The first American ancestor of this name was Edward Howell, of Marsh Gibbon, Buckinghamshire, England, who came with his family to Boston in 1639, and soon after removed to Southampton as one of the earliest settlers of the place. The old stone manor house of Edward Howell is still standing at Marsh Gibbon, and is still inhabited as a residence. We may remark here that Southampton, Long Island, was the first town settled by the English in the state of New York. The parents of Professor Howell were Charles and Mary Rogers Howell, highly respected citizens of Southampton. Young Howell first attended the district school and then the academy at Southampton, He very early manifested his love for books and a strong desire to gain a knowledge of various languages which he acquired with remarkable facility. After due preparation at the academy he entered the sophomore class in Yale college in 1851, at the age of eighteen. In this excellent and renowned institution, then under the presidency of Theodore D. Woolsey, D. D., assisted by such professors as Silliman, Olmsted and Hadley, he had every facility for making a rapid progress in the wide fields of learning. ,But the natural sciences and the languages always enjoyed...

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