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Biography of Luther C. Tibbets

Luther C. Tibbets was born in South Berwick, York County, Maine, June 26, 1820. His father, James Tibbets, was a native of the same State and a farmer by occupation. The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools and reared a farmer until seventeen years of age. He then located in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, first engaging as a clerk in mercantile houses, and later established a general merchandise store at Great Falls, New Hampshire, which enterprise he conducted until 1844, when be sold out the establishment to his brother. It is worthy of mention that the mercantile house he established nearly half a century ago is still in existence, conducted by his brother and descendants, under the firm name of E. A. Tibbets & Son. Mr. Tibbets continued his mercantile pursuits, establishing himself in Portsmouth, and later transferring the scene of his operations to Boston, Massachusetts, where he opened a wholesale grocery business. He remained there until 1852, and then seeking a broader field of operations located in New York. The next ten years were spent in a large wholesale grocery business. In 1862 he entered into produce and grain dealing, and became one of the heaviest grain operators in the city. At that time the war was in active prosecution; bread-stuffs and cereals were being “cornered,” and the Government as well as other consumers was a special mark for the greed of the speculators. Mr. Tibbets declined to enter into “rings,” and especially did lie decline to combine against his country in meeting the provision supply for her immense armies. This excited the enmity of...

Biography of Arthur C. Wentworth

ARTHUR C. WENTWORTH, treasurer of the Springfield Cooperative Bank, was born in South Berwick, Maine, November 13, 1871. His father was Charles K. Wentworth and his mother Ellen M. (Plumer) Wentworth. His father was born on a farm at Berwick, Maine, in April, 1836, and followed farming for a number of years, afterwards living in South Berwick until his death in November, 1906. His mother was born in January, 1841, at South Berwick, Maine, and died in May, 1924. The Wentworth family derives its name from the lordship of Wentworth in the wapentake of Stafford, County of York, England, where lived Reginald de Winterwode at the time of the Conquest. Genealogists agree that the word is of Saxon origin, meaning white farm or court, taking its style from the soil composed of chalk or whitish clay. William Wentworth was baptized in the parish of Alford near the city of Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England, March 15, 1616, and is believed upon the evidence to be identical with Elder William Wentworth, the first of the Wentworths of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was from the same parish in England as the Rev. John Wheelwright, who came to this country in 1636. He was banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1637 on account of a sermon he preached in Boston, and settled with a company of followers at Piscataqua Falls, New Hampshire, who called their town Exeter; William Wentworth was one of the company. When the jurisdiction of Massachusetts was extended to include Exeter, Wheelwright and many of the colonists moved to Wells, Maine. William Wentworth appears to have lived in Wells...

Biography of Charles Chase Lord

Charles Chase Lord, Justice of the Peace, Notary Public, and the local historian of Hopkinton, is the second child and first son of Charles and Sarah (Hubbard) Lord. Born in South Berwick, Me., July 7, 1841, he is a lineal descendant, in the seventh generation, of Nathan Lord, who emigrated to America from Stackpole Court, Pembroke, Wales, and settled in ancient Kittery, Me., before 1652. In South Berwick, once a part of ancient Kittery, is a homestead of which Nathan Lord became a proprietor in 1676, and which is now in the possession of his descendants, the estate being situated in a district called “Old Fields.” Sarah Hubbard, who became the mother of Charles Chase Lord, was born in Hopkinton, N.H., daughter of John and Ruth (Chase) Hubbard. On her mother’s side she descended from the famous Chase family that has figured so prominently in both English and American history. In 1845 Charles Chase Lord, scarcely four years of age, awoke to recollection and found his home in New Market, N.H., where his father, a machinist, was eventually engaged as a contractor and builder of cotton machines for the late Samuel Brooks. This precocious little fellow was then able to read all those forms of composition usually put into the hands of young children, he having no memory of the time when the process of learning to read began. In 1846, in consequence of imperfect health, his father sought partial occupation upon the soil, and moved his family to a farm in Hopkinton, living there the most of the time afterward until his death in 1884. Charles Chase Lord...

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