Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biographical Sketch of Joseph A. Muir

One of the farms that gives a character of progressiveness to Saline County is owned and occupied by Joseph A. Muir, one of the younger representatives of the agricultural industry in this state. This farm is near Mentor in Walnut Township. It is a farm that Mr. Muir had known all his life and he was born there. He had 200 acres of land, and well adapted for the raising of alfalfa, which is one of his principal crops. In every point it is modern in equipment and facilities. He had substantial buildings, including barns and silos for the care of his crops, and is working the land in such a way as to secure the highest possible yield consistent with its continued fertility and productiveness. On that farm Mr. Muir was born July 5, 1889, a son of William and Mary (Crowther) Muir. Both parents were born in Scotland. His father was a pioneer Kansan, and took up the homestead in Walnut Township where his son Joseph new resided. William Muir died by accidental drowning in the Smoky Hill River in 1899. Joseph was one of five children, two sons and three daughters, named: Nettie, now wife of Henry Muir; John, a farmer in Saline County; Mary, wife of Victor Green, a farmer now living at Salina; Joseph A.; and Nellie, who is unmarried and resided with her mother in that county. The early life of Joseph A. Muir was spent on his father’s farm in Walnut Township. He attended the public schools and also the Kansas Wesleyan Business College at Salina. For the past ten or fifteen...

Biography of Samuel H. Waddle

Samuel H. Waddle is now the oldest original settler in his locality of Saline County. He went there more than fifty years ago. He knew Central Kansas when it was an almost unlimited stretch of prairie. The buffalo and the Indians were still here and the frontier civilization was a straggling line of homestead shacks and habitations, putting up a bold front against the domain of the wilderness. He suffered those privations due to searcity of crops, isolation from large towns and settlements, and he experienced the prairie fires, the long continued drought, the grasshoppers and every other plague and hardship so frequently recounted in these pages. Mr. Waddle was a young man, only a short time previously having been released from the army, when he came to Kansas. He had grown to a hearty old age in this state, and his exertions have made him financially independent. He is one of the leading farmers and stock raisers in the vicinity of Solomon. Mr. Waddle was born November 22, 1844, in a log house on a farm in Des Moines County, Iowa. His parents were William and Sarah (Braden) Waddle. William Waddle was born in Fayette County, Ohio, in 1809 and died at Topeka, Kansas, October 4, 1889. He came to Kansas in 1866, at the same time as his son Samuel, and acquired a tract of government land in Saline County nine miles southwest of Solomon. He improved that claim and lived there the rest of his active years. In 1834 William Waddle married Miss Braden, who was born in Fayette County, Ohio, in 1816. She died February...

Biography of Oscar Ramsey Searl, M. D.

Oscar Ramsey Searl, M. D. The name Searl had been associated with the medical profession in Northern Kansas for fully half a century. Dr. O. R. Searl is a son of a pioneer doctor of Solomon, Kansas, Dr. O. F. Searl. The son had practiced for nearly twenty years at Belvue, and besides his success in the profession he had made himself an influential factor in local affairs. He was born at Solomon, Kansas, July 5, 1872. Dr. O. F. Searl was of English family and represented Colonial settlers in Massachusetts. He was born in Massachasetts November 15, 1841, grew up there, and in 1861 enlisted in the medical department of the regular United States Army. He served throughout the war and was promoted to eaptain. He finished his studies in medicine at Harvard College, from which he had the degree Doctor of Medicine, and in 1867 he established a practice at Solomon, Kansas, where he was the first permanent physician. He looked after a large following of patients in that community for over thirty years. He is a man of adventurons spirit and when nearly sixty years of age, in 1900, he went to Alaska, being a passenger on the first boat that went to Nome. He spent twelye years in Alaska practicing his profession and since his return to Kansas in 1912 had lived retired at Solomon. He served as mayor of Solomon and was received of the United States Land Office at Salina, Kansas, during Cleveland’s administration from 1885 to 1889. Politieally he is a democrat, is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and the Grand...

Biography of William A. Hopkins

William A. Hopkins, now living retired at Solomon, had turned the seventy-fifth milepost on life’s journey. His years have accounted for something not only to himself but to his country and his community. He was a gallant and loyal soldier of the Union during more than three years of the Civil war. After his part in that struggle he came to Kansas and had been a resident of Dickinson County for practically half a century. The Solomon community esteems him not only as one of its oldest but one of its most highly respected citizens. An Indiana man by birth, he was born in a log house situated on a farm in Daviess County September 12, 1842. His parents were Zelek and Maria (Logan) Hopkins. Zelek Hopkins was born in Kentucky in 1807, a son of Washington E. Hopkins. This is the same branch of the Hopkins fainily which includes among its noted members Commodore Hopkins of the English navy. Zelek Hopkins went with his parents from Kentucky to Indiana when ten years of age and grew up on a pioneer farm in Daviess County. His active career was spent as a farmer and during the Civil war he served as provost marshal of Daviess County. His death occurred at Washington, Indiana, March 20, 1867. In 1829 he married Miss Maria Logan, who was born in 1807, a danghter of David Logan, a native of Ireland and a weaver by trade. Mra. Maria Hopkins died in 1901 at Solomon, Kansas, at the advanced age of ninety-four. She was the mother of eleven children, five sons and six daughters. Their...

Biographical Sketch of Robert Wildman

Robert Wildman, P. O. Ionia, was born in Ireland, February 25, 1848. Came to America in 1850, and located in Kankakee County, Ill. Came to Solomon City, Kan., and to Jewell County in February, 1870, and took a homestead eighteen miles southwest of Mankato, and is now the owner of the same. He and his brother are the owners of 200 head of hogs, and from 80 to 100 head of cattle. When Mr. Wildman settled in Jewell County, he was compelled to work out by the month, herding cattle etc., until he got a start in the world, so it is plain to be seen that a man can flourish and make money in this county if he will but put forth the effort. He is a member of the A. O. U. W. He was married in Jewell County, Kan., October 28, 1875, to Miss Emma C. Davis. They have three children – Blanche, Lee and Bert E. Mr. Wildman has held the office of Township...

Biography of Mary Pierce Van Zile

Mary Pierce Van Zile. A very important member of the faculty of the Kansas State Agricultural College is Mrs. Mary Pierce Van Zile, dean of women and dean of the division of home economics. Her name is a household word in many widely separated homes, for each year Mrs. Van Zile has under her immediate care and instruction from 800 to 900 girls. They come from many environments and are mostly in the most receptive period of their lives, and the influence exerted by Dean Van Zile largely moulds their future. Mary Pierce Van Zile was born on her father’s homestead, near Solomon, in Dickinson County, Kansas, February 7, 1873, and is a daughter of Lyman B. and Lea A. (Bandy) Pierce. The father was a native of Vermont and came of sterling New England stock. The mother was born in Indiana of equally excellent people and pioneer settlers. Lyman B. Pierce served as a soldier during the Civil war, in the Union army, for four years and three months, and shortly after its close pre-empted a homestead in Dickinson County, Kansas. After proving upon that land he removed to Henry County, Iowa, settling at Winfield, where he has since resided, devoting his active years largely to the manufacture of tiling, brick and sewer piping. He can look back over eighty years of a well-spent life. At Winfield, Iowa, Mary Pierce spent her childhood and young womanhood. Her early education was received in the public schools of Winfield, and the years of 1889-91 were spent as a student in the Kansas State Agricultural College although she did not remain...

Pin It on Pinterest