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Biographical Sketch of Frank Clair Wyckoff

Frank Clair Wyckoff is one of the many newcomers in Burlingame who has been attracted by the splendid opportunities that the rapid development of that town offers. Although Mr. Wyckoff came to Burlingame as a stranger just a year ago, he has risen to a high place in the esteem of his fellow business men and has established one of the most up-to-date undertaking and embalming establishments on the peninsula. Mr. Wyckoff is a native son, having been born in Sierra Valley, near Sierraville, Sierra County on June 1, 1872. After completing his education, he tried rubbing shoulders with the world in other parts of the country but returned to his native state in 1890 to become associated with the California Casket Company of San Francisco. He was with this company for nearly twenty-five years, ad-vancing from an inconsequential place to the responsible position of office manager. A year ago Mr. Wyckoff saw the reawakening of the peninsula and at the same time succumbed to the lure of being in business for himself. As a result he resigned his position with the California Casket Company and established an undertaking business in Burlingame. Besides his undertaking business in Burlingame, Mr. Wyckoff is an accountant and has charge of the bookkeeping for a large peninsula concern. Mr. Wyckoff is a member of the Elks and the Masons. He also belongs to the Burlingame Commercial Club and the San Mateo and Burlingame Merchants’...

Biography of William C. Carlton

This worthy gentleman is one of the substantial citizens of Malheur County and one of the thrifty stock men and farmers of the vicinity of Rockville, his estate of two hundred and twenty acres of good land lying seven miles west from that place. Mr. Carlton was born in Maine in 1834, being the son of Amos and Mary Carlton. He received his education from the County in the schools of his native state and there remained – until 1854 when he came via Panama to San Francisco, and thence to Indian valley in Sierra County, where he at once engaged in the fascinating labor of mining. In 186o we find him in Oregon, and then in Walla Walla, whence he returned to The Dalles and then visited his home in Maine. Returning again to California, he went to Los Angeles County, and thence to Boise, Idaho, where he engaged in wagon building until 1882, at which time he located his present home place as a homestead. Mr. Carlton has devoted his time and energies to raising stock, cattle and horses, and to general farming, from that time until the present, having achieved a good success in these endeavors. In addition to these labors, Mr. Carlton has also operated a blacksmith shop, gaining a good trade from the surrounding neighborhood. He has the prospects of a line coal mine on his lands, which will make them exceedingly valuable. The marriage of Mr. Carlton and Mrs. Phoebe Basil, a native of Iowa, was solemnized in Boise, Idaho, in 1871, and they have six children, William A.; Laura M., wife of...

Biography of George T. Lee

GEORGE T. LEE. It is a pleasure and a privilege to record the character and enterprise of men of business who, on account of their long tenure and extensive operations, comprise almost a history of the business in which they are engaged. Of such men it is unnecessary to speak in words of colored praise. By their acts ye shall know them.” Their very existence is emphatic evi-dence of the honorable position they occupy and the long course of just dealing that they have pursued. A gentleman in mind is George T. Lee, who was born in Jefferson County, Missouri, February 22, 1844, a son of Giles and Ary (Graham) Lee. Giles Lee was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, on March 10, 1796, and he was a son of John Lee, who came to this country from England in early times. The Great-grandfather Lee was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Giles Lee was reared in Virginia and came to Missouri in 1819, settling on the Mississippi River. There he passed the remainder of his days engaged in farming and tanning, his death occurring in 1880. His wife was a native of Jefferson County, Missouri, born on Big River in 1827, and she was a daughter of one of the early pioneers who came from Kentucky. Three children were given them: James W., George T. and Margaret V. William died in Wayne County, and Margaret married and in Wayne County. On the old home farm in Jefferson County our subject passed his youthful days, assisting on the same and attending the common schools. Later he entered the Western College...

Biography of Charles A. Schnabel

Thirty-seven years have passed since Charles Augusta Schnabel came to Idaho. This state, so aptly termed “the gem of the mountains,” was then a wild district, its lands unclaimed, its resources undeveloped. A few courageous frontiersmen had dared to locate within its borders, but the work of progress and improvement remained to the future, and there was little promise of early development. In the years which have since passed Mr. Schnabel has not only witnessed a most wonderful transformation, but has largely aided in the labors which have transformed the wild tract into a splendid commonwealth. Now in his declining years he is living retired, enjoying the well-earned rest which is the merited reward of a long and honorable business career. A native of Prussia, Mr. Schnabel was born in Elberfield, October 18, 1828 and for generations his ancestors had resided in the fatherland. He acquired his education in the public schools, and in Germany learned the trade of fringe and lace weaving. When a young man of twenty years he determined to try his fortune in America, landing in New York on the day that Zachariah Taylor was elected president of the United States. He then made his way to Baltimore, Maryland, where he had a brother living, and in that city worked at his trade for a year, when, hearing of the rich gold discoveries in California, he determined to make his way to the Pacific coast. Twice he attempted to work his way across the country, but each time, after getting as far as western Missouri, lack of means forced him to turn back. A third...

Biography of Robert Grostein

Robert Grostein, one of Idaho’s most successful pioneer merchants, has carried on business in Lewiston since 1862 and through the intervening years has borne an unassailable reputation in trade circles, never making an engagement which he has not kept nor contracting an obligation that he has not met. His sagacity and enterprise and moreover his untiring labor have brought to him a handsome competence, and the most envious could not grudge him his success, so honorably has it been acquired. Mr. Grostein is a native of Poland, born in 1835, and is the eldest in the family of four children whose parents were Moses and Bena (Herschell) Grostein. They also were natives of Poland, in which country they were reared and married, the father there remaining until 1838, when he came to the United States. He had been in sympathy with Napoleon, to whom he had rendered active assistance, and for this reason he was obliged to flee from his native land. After spending a year in America he sent for his family, having decided to make his home in the land of the free. He settled first at Mason, Georgia, spending six years there, after which he went to Buffalo, New York, and was engaged in trade there until 1870. In that year he came to Lewiston, Idaho, bringing with, him his good wife, and here they spent their remaining days with their son Robert, the father dying in 1891, at the age of ninety-two years, while the mother reached the age of eighty-eight years. Of their family two sons and the daughter are yet living. During his...

Biography of Alfred Damas

The career of Mr. Damas has been a very eventful and interesting one, and now, at the age of sixty-four, he is the possessor of a handsome competence, the fitting reward of his well spent life. For twenty-six years he has been prominently connected with the mercantile interests of Lewiston and his efforts have been an important element in the progress and advancement of this section of the state. He was born far from his present home, being a native of Brussels, Belgium, where his birth occurred on the 18th of July, 1835. He attended school in his native country until nine years of age and then became a cadet in the celebrated naval academy at Antwerp, where he remained for several years, spending a part of the time on a school-ship at sea. During that period they sailed in every sea and visited all of the principal ports of the world, and later Mr. Damas was graduated as a second-class midshipman. In 1848 his father sent him to Salem, Massachusetts, to learn the English language, and there, as an apprentice, he went aboard the vessel Thomas Perkins, under command of Captain William Rogers, sailing for San Francisco, California, the vessel dropping anchor in that harbor in the summer of 1849. Gold had but recently been discovered and the great excitement there caused every man to desert the ship save Mr. Damas and the captain, who had to do the common sailor’s work. Early in the spring of 1850 they secured a small crew of men and boys and sailed to the Sandwich islands, where a good crew was...

Biography of Jacob C. Garber

The efficient and capable postmaster of Grangeville, Jacob C. Garber, is a native of Rockingham County, Virginia, born near Fort Republic, January 7, 1829. The family is of Swiss origin and the ancestors of our subject crossed the Atlantic to the New World prior to the Revolutionary war. They were long residents of Pennsylvania and Virginia, and in religious faith were Dunkards. Martin Garber, the father of our subject, was born in the Old Dominion and married Miss Magdalen Mohler, a lady of German lineage and a representative of one of the old Virginian families. Fourteen children were born of this union, of whom eight sons and three daughters grew to years of maturity. The father was a farmer by occupation, and died of palsy, in the fifty-fourth year of his age. His wife attained a very advanced age and finally met death by accident, in the upsetting of a stagecoach in which she was a passenger. Jacob C. Garber, their fourth child, was educated in Virginia and Ohio, the family having removed to the latter state when he was fourteen years of age. Subsequently he emigrated with an older brother to Iowa, and in 1854 he sailed from New York to California, going by way of the Nicaragua route to San Francisco, where he arrived on the 13th of August. He then engaged in mining in Sierra and Nevada counties, meeting with good success. It was his intention to return home in 1857, but, being taken ill, a year had passed before he had sufficiently recovered to travel, and by that time the expenses of his sickness had...

Biography of Asher R. Robinson

ASHER R. ROBINSON. – One of Union county’s prosperous and substantial business men and agriculturists is found in the person of the subject of this sketch, who has wrought faithfully, here in the industrial world for forty years, during which time he has manifested wisdom and integrity that have given him the confidence of his fellows, and added to his enterprising spirit have enabled him to become one of the well-to-do men who have materially assisted in promoting the welfare of the county in these years of its formative existence, molding its institutions and assisting in its government. On July 27, 1829, Asher R. was born to Asher and Betsy (Worden) Robinson, in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, whence seven years later he was removed by his parents to Michigan, where the father pre-empted eighty acres and builded a home. The son assisted in tilling the farm and attended school until 1849; then his spirit was ready to take part in life’s battle on his own account and he went to the famous pineriers of the Peninsular state, operating there until he was twenty-seven years of age. In 1856 he started on the long and dangerous trip via panama to the Pacific coast, landing in Sierra county, California, in due time, where he at once commenced to mine. Rather poor success attended his efforts in this line, and he turned toward the north, going to the Okanogan and Similikameen rivers, where he prospected for a time and then repaired to Walla Walla and operated a pack train to the mining camps of northern Idaho in partnership with Ed Payne. In October,...

Biography of Joseph K. Shields

Joseph K. Shields, of Riverside, was born in Cook County, Illinois, in 1853. His parents were James and Honore (Ward) Shields. His father was a native of Indiana and his mother of New York. In 1855 his father came with his family to California and located in Sierra County. He was a civil engineer by occupation and engaged in mining enterprises. At a later day he moved to Yuba County, where he engaged in farming, and in 1861 settled at Marysville. Mr. Shields was reared and schooled in that city, graduating at the high school. After graduating he engaged in work on his father’s ranch, which was located in Yuba County. In 1875 he established a meat market and livery stable near Marysville and conducted them until 1876. For the next four years Mr. Shields was engaged in various pursuits until he entered the service of the Central Pacific Railroad Company. He entered that employ as a laborer, but his abilities and strict attention to his work soon gained him promotion and he was given positions of trust and responsibility. He was for many years a clerk in the shipping department. In 1885 his health compelled him to seek some other occupation and he came to San Bernardino County and located at Riverside. He first opened a meat market and was in that business until 1887. He then became associated with the Riverside Daily Enterprise as a reporter, and later, in the same connection with the Riverside Chronicle. In June 1888, he accepted the position as editor of the Riverside Enterprise, and has held that position to the present...
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