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Moore, Minnie Stoughton – Obituary

Mrs. Minnie O. Moore, 68 years old, wife of Otis (Alvie) Moore, died at her home, 1002 South West street at 2:30 o’clock Wednesday morning after a long illness. She had suffered six paralytic strokes, the first one thirteen years ago. Mrs. Moore had been an invalid for ten years. She was born in Douglas county, Illinois July 26, 1875 and was the daughter of the Rev. Samuel and Belinda Stoughton. She had spent all her life in this county with the exception of eight years she spent in Illinois. The deceased had been a resident of Shelbyville for the past nineteen years. She married Mr. Moore February 19, 1893. He survives with two of the six children, Frank D. Moore, of the Armstrong & Moore Real Estate and Insurance dealers, of this city and Paul B. Moore, at home. She also leaves four brothers, Claybourne, of Alexandria; Robert of Bartholomew county and Thomas and George Stoughton, both of this city; two grandchildren, Jean Ann and John Edward. Mrs. Moore’s parents were pioneers of Shelby county. Her father was a Baptist minister. Mrs. Moore was a member of the Blue River Baptist church of Jackson township. Funeral rites will be held at the late home at 1:30 o’clock Friday afternoon. The Rev. Clarence Hager, pastor of the Calvary Baptist church will officiate. The body will be placed in the Temple Hill Mausoleum. C. F. Fix & Son, funeral directors, will be in charge. Friends may call at the late home after noon Thursday. Shelbyville Republican, Wednesday, July 15, 1936 Contributed by: Shelli...

Oltman, Emma May Stoughton – Obituary

Tragedy interrupted preparations for what would otherwise have been a pleasant family dinner Sunday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sardis McQueen, near Clifford, in Bartholomew county, when Mrs. Emma May Oltman, 52 years old, wife of William A. Oltman, of Jackson township in Shelby county, fell from a kitchen doorway to the hard floor of a fruit cellar below, fracturing her skull and breaking her neck. She died fifteen minutes later, at about 11:30 o’clock. Mrs. Oltman was a sister of Thomas and George Stoughton of Shelbyville. She and her husband and two of their children, Robert Samuel and Mary Katherine Oltman, had gone to the McQueen home earlier on Sunday morning to be dinner guests of the McQueen’s. Mr. McQueen is an uncle of Mrs. Oltman. She made no outcry when she fell. Others in the room did not realize what had happened until they heard the sound of her fall. The body was taken to the Fix & Son mortuary here in an ambulance, summoned immediately after the accident. Death had occurred before the ambulance arrived. Besides the husband and the two children and brothers already mentioned, Mrs. Oltman leaves two daughters, Mrs. John Hughes, of Jackson township, and Mrs. Jerry Lewis, of Edinburg; two brothers, Robert Stoughton, of Hendricks township, and Clabe [Claybourne] Stoughton, of Alexandria, Indiana, and a sister, Mrs. Minnie Moore, mother of Frank Moore, who is trustee of Addison township, this county. Mrs. Oltman was a daughter of Samuel and Belinda Stoughton and was born in Illinois June 30, 1880. At the time of her death, she was aged 52 years,...

Biography of Edward Thomas James

Among the veterans of the great Civil war who came in numbers to Kansas following the end of strife, was Edward Thomas James, whose useful and honorable life closed on December 6, 1915. For almost a half century he was one of the representative men of Shawnee County, an active force in the development of this section and one who will long be remembered for his sterling traits of character. Edward Thomas James was born in Talbot County, Maryland, August 27, 1830. At the time of his death he was the only survivor of his parents’ family of three children. His only sister died in infancy. Between himself and his brother W. Lambert, three years his junior, there existed the closest affection until the latter’s death. In his youth Mr. James had only limited educational opportunities but a love of reading and contact with many phases of life provided him with information on every subject and caused him in later years to be chosen for offices of trust and responsibility in his community. In 1857 he moved with his family to Indiana and shortly after Civil war was declared he enlisted for service in the Union army, becoming a member of the Ninth Indiana Infantry. He fell sick and was- granted a furlough but subsequently re-enlisted and continued in the army until the close of the war. In 1867, accompanied by his own and several other families, Mr. James made the overland trip to Topeka, from Brazil, Indiana, six weeks being consumed in the journey. Mr. James resided near Topeka until 1871 when he moved to a farm west...

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