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Biography of Thomas B. Trower, M. D.

Thomas B. Trower, M. D., deceased, late of Charleston; was born in Albemarle Co., Va., Nov. 15, 1807, his parents removing to Kentucky a few years later; his father died in 1816, leaving a wife and nine children; he began the study of medicine when he was 19 years old, spending three years under the instruction of Drs. Beamiss and Merryfield, of Bloomfield, Ky., teaching school a portion of the time to obtain means to defray his expenses; he came to Illinois in 1830, and practiced medicine six years in Shelbyville; in 1836, he removed to Charleston and engaged in merchandising, which business he abandoned after three years and resumed the practice of his profession; his practice was a large and lucrative one, extending over a wide scope of country, embracing all of Coles Co., and a portion of surrounding counties, and his acquaintance with the pioneers of this section of the State was correspondingly extensive; his standing among physicians was very high, indeed, and his opinions in their councils most thoroughly respected; he was a member of the Eberlean Medical Society, of the Æsculapian Society of the Wabash Valley, and of the State Medical Society; not only was he prominent as a physician, but was possessed of business abilities of the highest order, and by his financial skill and industry amassed a large fortune; he was President of the Moultrie County Bank, of Sullivan, Ill., and Vice President of the First National Bank, of Charleston; while living in Shelbyville, he represented his county for three years in the State Legislature. He was also a delegate to the Constitutional...

Biography of Daniel H. Tremble

Daniel H. Tremble, Deputy County Treasurer, Charleston; was born in Harrison Co., Ind., Aug. 28, 1829; the following year, his father, Hiram M. Tremble, came with his family to this county, and, after spending a short time in what is now Mattoon Tp., went to Shelby Co., and there resided until 1833, -when he returned to Coles Co., arid is now a prominent farmer in Mattoon Tp. The subject of this sketch started for himself in 1851, as a teacher; he taught school two winters; in 1852, he engaged in farming, and, after gathering his first crop, came to Charleston, where he worked three months at the carpenter’s trade, which he had learned of his father, who was a carpenter by trade; after this, he spent six months in an academy in Georgetown, Vermilion Co., Ill.; the following spring, his father took a contract to grade twenty miles of the Illinois Central B. R., and Daniel H. assisted him in the work; in 1854, he engaged in merchandising in Paradise, and, in 1856, removed to Mattoon and continued in trade there two years, when he sold out and engaged as a clerk; in 1862, he was elected -Constable, and, in the spring of 1863, Collector of his township; in the fall of the same year, he was elected Treasurer of Coles Co., and held that office three terms in succession; after the expiration of his last term, he served four years as Deputy County Clerk. In 1872, he purchased a farm of 175 acres, about two miles from the city, on which he now resides. He was appointed Deputy...

Biography of Hon. John Monroe

Hon. John Monroe, deceased, late of Charleston; was born in Glasgow, Barren Co., Ky., Sept. 24, 1811; his boyhood was passed in the private schools of his native town; his father dying when he was but a boy, he entered the apothecary-shop of his uncle, Dr. George Rogers, a physician of Glasgow, and there became familiar with the compounding of medicines, and also studied medicine under his uncle’s instruction; he first began practice in Tennessee, and, in November, 1833, came to Illinois and engaged in the practice of his profession in Shelbyville, soon removing to Charleston, and, a few years later, he engaged in business as a dry goods merchant. Returning to Kentucky, he was married, April 4, 1840, to Mrs. Martha Ferrish, a widow lady of Greensburg. in that State, and came again to Charleston; they had six children, two of whom are still living – Mrs. Stanley Walker and Lewis Monroe, of Charleston. His wife died May 14, 1854, and, on the 6th of November, 1854, he married Miss Hannah Chambers, a daughter of James and Sally Chambers, of Cynthiana, Ky., who came to Coles Co. with her parents in 1851; of five children of this marriage, three are now living – Emma (wife of Thomas T. Threlkeld, of Charleston), Virginia and Henrietta. Dr. Monroe continued in the dry goods trade in Charleston until 1858, when he moved to Lafayette Tp., where he owned a farm of 1,700 acres. He laid out the village of Stockton, building the switch and a warehouse and store at that place; he still, however, retained .his interest in business in Charleston,...

Biography of John Root

A venerable citizen of Wallowa County is named at the head of this article, and we are pleased to grant to him a representation in the annals of his county: since here he has manifested commendable real and ability in forwarding its interests and in assisting to build it up in all lines, while also in other places he has displayed equally excellent activities; and also because when the time of trouble was upon the nation, he immediately responded to the call of patriotism to handle the musket in defense of the flag that had been insulted and was in danger of being hauled down from the standard of freedom, and right nobly did he do military service, displaying a bravery and courage and faithfulness that mark him as the good soldier and noble patriot. Mr. Root was born in Hocking County, Ohio, near Logan, on March 15, 1837, being the son of John and Catherine (Steele) Root. His early life was spent on the farm with his parents, and in acquiring a good education from the common schools of his vicinity. On October 15, 1861, when the conflict was demonstrated to be real, he enlisted in Company H, Fifty-eight Ohio Infantry, where he was soon promoted to fourth corporal. In this capacity he participated in the battle of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Haines Landing, besides numerous skirmishes. After one year in this relation he was transferred, on account of poor health, into the Fifth Veteran Reserve Corps, and three years were spent in this service and then he was honorably discharged, leaving a record both bright and faithful. Mr....
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