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Biography of John Crete, Sr.

The Fatherland has furnished to America many of her valued citizens, men who have crossed the Atlantic to ally their interests with those of “the land of the free.” Adapting them-selves to entirely new surroundings, customs and manners, they have achieved success and won a place among the representative men of the communities in which their lots have been cast. Such is true of John Crete, the genial, well-known and popular proprietor of the War Eagle Hotel, at Silver City. Born in Hasbrouck, Hanover, Germany, April 25, 1832, he was a son of a Ger-man soldier who afterward became a police officer, and while making an arrest, was beaten by a criminal. His injuries brought on blood-poisoning, from which he died when fifty-two years of age. His wife long survived him, and passed away at the advanced age of ninety years. They had six children, five sons and one daughter, all now deceased but two. John Crete, the fourth in order of birth, was educated in the schools of his native land, and in 1849, when seventeen years of age, crossed the Atlantic to the New World, hoping to better his financial condition in this country, where broader and better opportunities are afforded young men. He landed in New York and there accepted a position as salesman in a coffee and teahouse, where he remained until i860, when he sailed for California, going by the isthmus route. At the old town of Shasta in the northern part of California he first engaged in mining. On the 1st of May, 1862, with seven others, he started on a prospecting tour...

Biography of James A. Pinney

The enterprise of our American citizens has given the nation a position among the powers of the world that it has taken other countries many centuries to gain. The progressive spirit of the times is manifest throughout the length and breadth of the land, yet even to our own people the growth and development of the west seems almost incredible. Less than half a century ago Idaho, California, Montana, Oregon and other western states were wild and almost unpeopled regions, without the railroad or other transportation facilities, without the telegraph or the varied commercial and industrial industries of the east. The hostile Indians made it a hazardous under-taking to establish homes in the district, but some fearless and sturdy spirits pushed their way into the wild region, reclaimed it from desolation and Indian rule, and to-day beautiful towns and enterprising villages dot the landscape, and in no particular are the improvements or the com-forts or the advantages of the east lacking in this district. Among those who have made Boise one of the most attractive and progressive centers of population in the northwest is James Alonzo Pinney, who has left the impress of his individuality upon many of the business interests of the city and thereby become an essential factor in the history of its upbuilding. He is a native of Ohio, born in Franklin County, on the 29th of September 1835, descended from New England ancestry, the family having been established in Vermont at a very early day in the colonial epoch. Four brothers emigrated westward to Franklin County, Ohio, one of whom was Azariah Pinney, the grandfather...

Biography of George Pettengill

The subject of this review is one whose history touches the pioneer epoch in the annals of the state of Idaho, and whose days form an integral part of that indissoluble chain which linked the early formative period with that of latter day progress and prosperity. Not alone is there particular interest attaching to his career as one of the pioneers of Idaho, but in reviewing his genealogical record we find his lineage tracing back to the colonial history of the nation and to that period which marked the inception of the grandest republic the world has ever known. Through such sources have we attained the true American type, and along this line must our investigations proceed if we would learn of the steadfast and unyielding elements which constitute the basis upon which has been reared the lofty and magnificent superstructure of an en-lightened and favored commonwealth. In 1620 Richard Pettengill was born in Staffordshire, England, and in 1641 he landed on the shores of New England, there to found a family that has sent its branches out into various sections of the country. He married Johanna Ingersol, and their son, Samuel, was married February 3, 1674, to Sarah Poor. On the 18th of December. 1692, was born to them a son, to whom they gave the name of Benjamin. He was the father of Andrew P. Pettengill, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch. He was born in 1742 and removed to Salisbury, New Hampshire, where he married Miss Sarah Abigail Greely, who was born in 1749. Their son, David Pettengill, father of our subject, was born...

Biography of Frederick Crete, Sr.

One of the most successful pioneer citizens of Silver City is Frederick Crete, who is a native of Hanover, Germany, where he was born in August 1833. He is a brother of John Crete, Sr., whose sketch will be found elsewhere in this volume. While still a young man Mr. Crete decided to try his fortunes in the New World, of which he had heard so much, and bidding adieu to the Fatherland and all its happy associations, he embarked on a vessel which landed him in New York city in 1852. From there he found his way to Attleboro, Massachusetts, where for some time he worked at the jewelry business. In 1858 Mr. Crete became a victim of the California fever and took a trip to the land of gold by way of the Isthmus of Panama, sailing on the steamer John L. Stephens. He remained in California until 1865, during that time studying and practicing dentistry, and then removed to Silver City, where he carried on his profession for some years. He also had a store at a place called Fairview, on Eagle Mountain. This town was burned out in 1875 and Mr. Crete lost all his property. Soon after this the great excitement caused by the discovery of gold in the Black Hills swept over the land, and our subject started with hundreds of others to test the truth of the reports. He traveled as far as Cheyenne, Wyoming, but on reaching there received some intelligence from Silver City which caused him to return, and soon afterward he started the Silver City brewery, which he has...

Biography of Eli K. Anderson

ELI K. ANDERSON. – There is no pioneer of whom volumes might be written with more propriety than he whose name appears above. Miner, Indian fighter, relentless pursuer of horse thieves, pioneer of the great fruit industry of Southern Oregon, and sterling temperance man, and singular, almost passing belief, in this age of defilers of themselves of tobacco, a total abstainer his whole life long from the use of the weed, – such is our subject. He was born in Indiana in 1826; and, after various transferences of residence in that state, during which he learned the carpenter’s trade, he came to California with the Owen’s train in 1849, – being one of the Argonauts who steered their vehicles across the seas of grass and alkali deserts. They were afflicted with cholera and lost cattle on the way, but were not otherwise annoyed. Mr. Anderson stopped near the present site of Shasta City, and made the descent of the Sacramento river the next year in a skiff constructed of lumber, whip-sawed by himself with the help of three other young men. At Sacramento, they sold their boat for five hundred dollars, and went to San Francisco, where they bought a sail boat, and returned with a cargo of flour, which they disposed of at Marysville to good advantage. Anderson thereupon began working at his trade for sixteen dollars a day. In 1850, he came to the mines in Northern California, and was so fortunate as to be one of the original discoverers of the famous Scott bar, on Scott river, where for ten days they were unmolested by the...

Biography of Henry Heppner

HENRY HEPPNER. – This s the gentleman after whom the city, in which he resides, and of which he was one of the first proprietors, and the builder of the first brick building, has been worthily named. He was born in Germany in 1843. He came to New York in 1858 and in 1863 via Cape Horn to San Francisco. His first venture was in Shasta, California, in the mercantile business; but after two years he transferred his business to Corvallis, Oregon. Meeting with little encouragement there he opened a stock at The Dalles, doing well for six years. As the mines of Idaho were opening out, he projected a trade with that territory. It was no easy matter transporting goods in the troublous times of 1861-63. The great war raging at that time took the attention of the government; and the Indians of the plains and the Upper Columbia became saucy and troublesome. Heppner operated by the CaƱon City route. His means of transportation was a train of pack mules. On one of his trips, nearly two years after his commencement of the business, his train of twenty-nine mules was attacked, the animals driven in one direction, and the five men in charge compelled to take shelter in another. Fortunately this mishap occurred on the return trip, when the train was empty. He was able to replace the animals, and continued his business without trouble from the Indians, “except,” as he says phlegmatically, “being fired on once or twice.” being shot at was so common an occurrence up east of the mountains as scarcely to be noticed. In...

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