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Biography of T. W. Swigart

T. W. Swigart, the leading harness dealer and one of the most successful business men in Newman and Douglas County, was born in Carroll County, Maryland, in sight of A Westminister, July 3, 1831, and was a son of Joseph Swigart. When nine years of age T. W. Swigart removed with his parents to Seneca County, Ohio, where he spent a large portion of his life on a farm. From the years 1848 to 1851 he devoted his time to learning the trade of harness maker at Bellefontaine, Ohio. He was a young man of good habits and of splendid mechanical turn of mind; he learned the trade thoroughly and soon became a first-class work-man. In the year 1852 he removed to Attica, Indiana, where he resided and worked at his trade successfully up to the year 1870, when he went to Princeton, Illinois. There he met Miss Sarah Jane Martin, who, in 1871, became his wife. In the same year he came to Danville, Illinois, where he followed his trade until the month of February, 1873, when he came to Newman and succeeded Speelman & Ogden in the harness business. During his residence in Newman he has become one of the most successful business men in the city and has accumulated quite a lot of property. In politics he is thoroughly independent and there is very little of hypocrisy in his nature. He is thoroughly candid and outspoken in his convictions. He has served three terms as president of the town board. He has also been a member of the board of health and director of the Building...

Biography of John S. Dean

John S. Dean, of Topeka, has been a Kansas lawyer for over thirty years, was for five years United States district attorney and by the force of his ability and his acknowledged service in many capacities is undoubtedly one of the foremost living lawyers of the state. His birth occurred in Seneca County, Ohio, November 11, 1861, and he is a son of William O. and Harriet J. (Curtiss) Dean. Mr. Dean was well educated, having attended college at Oberlin and determined upon the law as a profession when quite young. He became a student in the office of Judge James Pillars at Tiffin, Ohio, and in 1883, at the age of twenty-two, took the examination before the Ohio State Supreme Court. He was admitted to the bar, and in the same year came west to Kansas and established his home and office at Marion. Being well grounded in the principles of law, a hard worker, and possessing natural qualifications to an unusual degree for his chosen profession, success followed almost as a matter of course. It is likely that he would have made a success of medicine, the ministry or in commercial lines, for he is the type of man who would succeed in almost any environment and in any line of endeavor he might select. In the language of a well known citizen of Kansas Mr. Dean has “by sheer ability and force of character fought his way to an enviable position among the best lawyers and citizens of the state.” It was in 1901 that the President appointed him United States district attorney, an office to...

Slave Narrative of David A. Hall

Person Interviewed: David A. Hall Location: Canton, Ohio Place of Birth: Goldsboro, NC Date of Birth: July 25, 1847 Place of Residence: 1225 High Ave., S.W., Canton, Ohio Ohio Guide, Special Ex-Slave Stories August 16, 1937 DAVID A. HALL “I was born at Goldsboro, N.C., July 25, 1847. I never knew who owned my father, but my mother’s master’s name was Lifich Pamer. My mother did not live on the plantation but had a little cabin in town. You see, she worked as a cook in the hotel and her master wanted her to live close to her work. I was born in the cabin in town. “No, I never went to school, but I was taught a little by my master’s daughter, and can read and write a little. As a slave boy I had to work in the military school in Goldsboro. I waited on tables and washed dishes, but my wages went to my master the sane as my mother’s. “I was about fourteen when the war broke out, and remember when the Yankees came through our town. There was a Yankee soldier by the name of Kuhns who took charge of a Government Store. He would sell tobacco and such like to the soldiers. He was the man who told me I was free and then give me a job working in the store. “I had some brothers and sisters but I do not remember them-can’t tell you anything about them. “Our beds were homemade out of poplar lumber and we slept on straw ticks. We had good things to eat and a lot of...

Wyandot Indians

Wyandot Tribe: Meaning perhaps “islanders,” or “dwellers on a peninsula.” Occasionally spelled Guyandot. At an earlier date usually known as Huron, a name given by the French from huré, “rough,” and the depreciating suffix -on. Also called: Hatindiaβointen, Huron name of Huron of Lorette. Nadowa, a name given to them and many other Iroquoian tribes by Algonquians. Telamatenon, Delaware name, meaning “coming out of a mountain or cave.” Thastchetci’, Onondaga name. Connection. The Wyandot belonged to the Iroquoian linguistic family. Wyandot Location. The earliest known location of the Huron proper was the St. Lawrence Valley and the territory of the present province of Ontario from Lake Ontario across to Georgian Bay. The Tionontati were just west of them on Lake Huron. (See also Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.) Wyandot Villages There are said to have been four confederated Huron tribes in the time of Champlain. Cartier, who first met these people, gives the following town names: Araste, on or near St. Lawrence River below the site of Quebec. Hagonchenda, on St. Lawrence River not far from the point where it is joined by Jacques Cartier River. Hochelaga, on Montreal Island. Hochelay, probably near Point Platon, Quebec. Satadin, location uncertain. Stadacona, on the site of the present Quebec. Starnatan, just below the site of Quebec. Tailla, near Quebec. Teguenondahi, location uncertain. Tutonaguay, 25 leagues above the site of Quebec. The following towns, some under their native names and others under the names of the missions established by the French Jesuits, existed in Ontario between Lake Simcoe and Georgian Bay in the first half of the seventeenth century Andiata....

Biography of Jacob Smith

Jacob Smith, of Topeka, was one of the notable pioneers of Kansas. He lived in this state half a century. During this time he distinguished himself by a large degree of constructive enterprise in various business affairs. He was a pioneer merchant at Topeka, was also one of the early county officials, was a banker, was interested in the building of railroads and was throughout noted as a man of unusual sound judgment, of great foresight and discernment, and of absolute integrity. The record of his life as given in the following paragraphs is essentially a part of Kansas history. He was born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, near Reading, June 24, 1829, and died at his home in Topeka, November 30, 1908. His parents and grandparents were natives of Pennsylvania, their families having come to this country from Leipsic, Germany, at a very early date. When he was two years old in 1831 his father, John Smith, and mother, Hannah Darsham, moved to Somerset, Perry County, Ohio. He received a good education in the country schools and one item of his early experience was clerking in the Boyden Store, where one of his classmates, Phil Sheridan, was also employed. Phil Sheridan later became the dashing cavalry leader and one of the most distinguished generals of the Civil war. In April, 1852, Jacob Smith married Jane K. Von Cannon, at Tiffin, Ohio. Their wedding journey was to Bluffton, Indiana, where they were to make their home, and there Mr. Smith set up in the mercantile business. His daughter, Ida, was born there in 1855. In 1857 Jacob Smith decided to...

Biographical Sketch of Elden J. Hopple

Hopple, Elden J.; lawyer; born, Crawford County, Ohio, Feb. 5, 1881; son of Jeremiah and Martha Schieber Hopple; educated, Heidelberg University, Tiffin, O.; Western Reserve University Law School; early education, public schools; married, Cleveland Oct. 12, 1912, Elizabeth Benoit; State Senator 80th Democratic General Assembly; admitted to practice law June, 1905; member firm of McCullough & Hopple; previous to admission to the bar, taught school for three years, in the public schools of Crawford county; director Cleveland Chamber of Progress; member Bunton D. Babcock, F. & A. M., No. 600, McKinley Chapter, R. A. M., No. 181, B. P. O. E. No. 18; member City...

Biography of John H. Crider

John H. Crider. A continuous practice as a member of the Fort Scott bar since 1882 gives John H. Crider a distinction not only as one of the oldest members of the local bar, but also as one of the most successful. From the first Mr. Orider has looked upon the law not so much as a vocation as a profession requiring all the loyalty and service of his nature and throughout has kept his work in full accord with the high standards and dignity of his vocation. It may be a matter of interest to recall that Mr. Crider earned his first fee of $100 from Hon. Eugens Ware, “Ironquill,” this amount being paid him for his services as referee in proceedings in aid of an execution. Mr. Crider was born in Lancaster, Ohio, March 2, 1859, son of Dr. Henry L. and Sarah Ann (Weisz) Crider. The founder of the Crider family in the United States was Jacob Crider, who was born in Germany in 1768, and was an early settler in Fairfield County, Ohio, where he followed farming until his death in 1824. He was the great-grandfather of the Fort Scott attorney. His wife, Barbara Weaver, was also born in Germany and died in Fairfield County, Ohio, in 1844. Jacob Crider, grandfather of John H., was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, February 12, 1807, and died there in 1868. His wife, Elizabeth, died in Fairfield County in 1862. Dr. Henry L. Crider, who was born near Lancaster, Ohio, in 1827 and was reared on a farm near that town, died there in 1896. He was a...

Biographical Sketch of Jesse Stephens

Stephens, Jesse; attorney; born, Wood County, Feb. 9, 1865; son of David and Elizabeth Bonam Stephens; educated, Fostoria Academy and The Ohio Northern University; read law with the Hon. Thomas N. Bierly, of Toledo; admitted to the bar in 1889; married, Fremont, O., 1887, Miss Belle Clark; issue, two sons, A. A. and Clarence Clark Stephens; practiced law in Fostoria, O., for twenty years, attaining a high place in the legal profession; particularly noted as trial lawyer, having tried some of the most important cases in Northwestern Ohio; has never sought political honors, although urged to become a candidate for District Judge and Congressman from the 13th district; because of increasing clientele in Cuyahoga County, came to Cleveland, and began practicing with his son, A. A. Stephens, a graduate of Western Reserve Law School; counsel and director The Commonwealth Realty & Building Co., The Seneca Coal Co., Fostoria, O., counsel The Toledo, Fostoria & Findlay Electric R. R. Co., Toledo; The Union National Bank, Fostoria, and The Atlas Mnfg. Co., and The Peabody Buggy Co., all of Fostoria; member Pemberville Lodge, No. 516, F. & A. M., since 1889; his family were among the early settlers of Maryland and Western Pennsylvania, Scotch-Irish-German descent; active in Colonial cause during the...

Biography of Jacob Rumbaugh

Jacob Rumbaugh was for twenty-eight years one of the most widely known citizens of Fort Scott. He had come to that section of Kansas and established a home on lands just across the state line in Missouri in 1870. He endured all the trials and vicissitudes that beset the average farmer of his day. But he was not himself an average man. He had a resourcefulness, a faculty for hard work, that often made him prosper while others were blaming fate for hard times and misfortunes. He was optimistic. As long as he lived he was sustained by hope. It had been well said that when a man ceases to hope he is spiritually dead. Hope is only another word for faith. It was faith that took Jacob Rumbaugh through every trial of life. It was faith that sustained him during the 15 years he spent as an invalid prior to his death on December 1, 1910. As a citizen he was liberal minded, always ready to do his share or more than his share in any undertaking for the public benefit. He was a generous neighbor and friend, and in spite of the sufferings that burdened his later years he was never heard to complain. Apart from his experiences, his achievements, his useful life in the state and among his family and neighbors, he rendered on especially noteworthy service when in his declining years he put down on paper the words which were published in the year of his death under the title “Reminiscences of Jacob Rumbaugh.” These reminiscences were written and dedicated to his children and grandchildren,...

Biography of Hon. Albert Briggs

HON. ALBERT BRIGGS. – Ever green in the memory of the pioneer of the Pacific coast remain the trials and hardships they endured while establishing civilization in the far west. These pioneers, constituted no ordinary class; they were hardy, brave and energetic men; and thousands to-day are reaping the benefits which have accrued from the trials and hardships endured by the early pioneer. None among them deserve more tribute than the subject of this sketch, an excellent portrait of whom is placed in this history, from a photograph taken when he was in his seventy-fifth year. Mr. Briggs was born in Sholam, Addison county, Vermont, August 26, 1813, and is the son of Benjamin I. and Electric Trippman Briggs. When he was seven years of age his parents moved to Northem county, Pennsylvania, and one year later to Guernsey county, Ohio, where our subject resided, learning the carpenter’s trade, until the winter of 1835, when he, with his wife and one child, moved to Seneca county and lived until 1844. He then removed to Indiana, and after spending some months there and in Chicago, finally located in Andrew Jackson county, Iowa, of which his brother Ansil afterwards became governor. In the spring of 1847 he started with ox-teams, and with his wife and four children made the weary march across the almost trackless plains to Oregon. In the same train were Honorable L.B. Hustings, now deceased, and David Shelton, a respected citizen of the little city that now bears his name. Arriving at The Dalles in October, 1847, our subject with his family came down the Columbia to Portland...
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