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Descendants of Nicholas Snow of Eastham, MA

Nicholas Snow, a native of England, came to this country in 1623 in the ship “Ann,” locating in Plymouth, where he had a share in the division of land in 1624. In 1634 he removed to Eastham, where he became a prominent citizen. His home was on the road from Plymouth to Eel river, on the Westerly side. He was admitted a freeman in 1633, and was elected town clerk at the first meeting of the town of Eastham, holding that office sixteen years. He was deputy to the General Court from 1648, three years; selectman from 1663, seven years. He and his son Mark signed the call to Rev. John Mayo to settle as their minister in 1655. He was one of Gov. Thomas Prence’s associates. He married at Plymouth, Constance, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, who came over in the “Mayflower.” Constance herself came in the “Mayflower.” She died in October, 1677. Mr. Snow died Nov. 15, 1676, in Eastham, Mass.

Barker Genealogy of Tiverton, RI

The Barker family of Tiverton, R. I., and vicinity, represented in that section by many prominent citizens, is one of the earliest settled families of New England. The first of the name of whom there is authentic record was Robert Barker, born in 1616, who came to New England at a very early day with John Thorp. In 1641, with others, he bought from Jonathan Brewster, son of Elder Brewster, a ferry and 100 acres of land at Marshfield. Later he located at Duxbury, where for several years he was a surveyor. His death occurred about 1691. He married Lucy Williams, who died March 7, 1681 or 1682.

Pierce Family of North Bridgewater, MA

The Pierce families of this country are and have long been very numerous. Early in the settlement of New England came representatives from England, most of them not related, so far as now known. Among them were Abraham, of Plymouth, 1623, who became one of the original purchasers of Bridgewater in 1645; Daniel, of Newbury, blacksmith, who came from Ipswich, County of Suffolk, in 1634, aged twenty-three years; John, of Dorchester, mariner from Stepney, Middlesex, before 1631; another John, of Dorchester and Boston; John, of Watertown, 1638; Capt. Michael, of Hingham and Scituate; Richard, of Portsmouth, R. I.; Robert, of Dorchester; Thomas, of Charlestown, who was admitted to the church there in 1634; and Capt. William, of Boston, who was a distinguished shipmaster of his time.

Dwelly Family of Fall River, MA

DWELLY (Fall River family). The name Dwelly is an uncommon one and the family not numerous in New England annals. The Fall River Dwelly family is a branch of the Rhode Island family and it of the Scituate (Mass.) family, the immediate Fall River family here considered being that of Dr. Jerome Dwelly, who for some threescore or more years has administered to the ailments of humanity in and about Fall River, where he has most surely been to this people the “beloved physician” and one of the city’s substantial men. In the succeeding generation, one of his sons – the late Frank H. Dwelly – was the treasurer of both the Tecumseh Mills and the Ancona Company, extensive manufacturing concerns of Fall River. Here follows in detail and chronologically arranged from the first known American ancestor of the family the history of this Fall River branch of the Dwelly family. Richard Dwelly, of Scituate in 1665, or earlier, probably the same who was in Lancaster in 1654, and in Hingham in 1663, sold his estate in Hingham and removed to Scituate. His farm in the latter place was on the road leading from the third Herring brook to the harbor. For service in King Philip’s war he received a grant of land between Cornet’s mill and the Plymouth road. He had meadow land at Till’s creek, which stream later took his name. He died in 1692. Besides Mary, baptized in 1664, at Hingham, he had children, Richard, Samuel and John. Of these, Samuel died in Phipps’s expedition to Canada in 1690. John married in 1693 Rachel Buck, and...

Descendants of Leonard Crocker Couch of Taunton MA

COUCH (Taunton family). The family bearing this name at Taunton whose representative head is now Leonard Crocker Couch, Esq., who since boyhood has been a resident of the city, occupied in mechanical and business lines, and for years one of the substantial men and useful citizens of the community, is one of long and honorable standing in the neighboring State of Connecticut and of distinction in our country. And through its Taunton alliance of a generation ago – that of Maj. Gen. Darius Nash Couch, of Civil war fame, the father of the present Leonard Crocker Couch just alluded to – with the family of Crockers, it is connected with some of the first families of Ancient Taunton and of the Bay State, among them the Leonards. Simon Couch, ancestor of the Taunton family of the name, appears as a freeman of Fairfield, Conn., in October, 1664. From manuscript in the possession of a descendant a tradition is found that Thomas and Simon Couch ran away from England, secreting themselves on board a vessel; sailed for America; that they landed at New Haven, where they separated, Thomas going to the east and Simon westward as far as Greens Farms, etc. Simon Couch married Mary, daughter of Francis Andrews, of Bankside. He became a large land-holder at Greens Farms. His will was probated in 1689. He was buried on land belonging to him at Frost Point, looking out over the sound, which he had set apart as a family burying ground and which was long known as the Couch Burial Hill. His wife survived him, dying in 1691. In his...

Descendants of Rev. George Shove of Fall River, MA

SHOVE. Rev. George Shove, gentleman, son of Margery, who was admitted to the church at Boston as a widow in 1638, and who subsequently was of Rowley and a proprietor and still later of Roxbury, where she married in 1654 Richard Peacock, became the third minister of Taunton, ordained Nov. 17, 1665. Of his ministerial life little is known except that be “preached acceptably,” and taught the Taunton school; and it is said that “no rumor of strife or discord in connection with him comes down to us.” His fame, however, as a land bolder and dealer in real estate bas not failed to reach us. He is represented as having been largely concerned in the secular transactions of the town and possessed of considerable wealth. He was one of the six original proprietors of Assonet Neck, when that purchase was made in 1680. His home lot was that of William Phillips, one of the first settlers on the east side of what is now High street, between Cohannet and Winthrop streets. On July 14, 1664, Mr. Shove married Hopestill, daughter of Rev. Samuel Newman, a learned man, the distinguished minister of Rehoboth. She died March 7, 1673, and he married Feb. 17, 1674-75, Mrs. Hannah Walley. She died in September, 1685, and he married Dec. 3, 1686, Mrs. Sarah Farwell. He died April 21, 1687. His mother Margery was buried at Taunton in 1680, with note that she was “mother of Mr. George Shove.” The children of Minister Shove were: Edward, born April 28, 1665 (buried Aug. 7, 1665); Elizabeth, born Aug. 10, 1666; Seth, born Sept. 10,...

Descendants of Captain Michael Pierce

The Pierce family is one of the ancient Colonial families of the Commonwealth, the forerunners of the name playing a conspicuous part as masters of vessels bringing hither emigrants from England. For several generations there has lived in New Bedford a branch of the old Rehoboth and Swansea Pierce family, descendants of Capt. Michael Pierce, who have been leading-spirits in the community — names especially conspicuous in the industrial life of the town and vicinity. Reference is made particularly to some of the descendants of the late Otis Norton Pierce, whose son, the late Hon. Andrew Granville Pierce, was for forty-two years treasurer of the Wamsutta Mills Company, an extensive and the most successful cotton industry of New Bedford, serving, too, for a time as its president, and who was officially connected with many other enterprises of New Bedford and elsewhere; and who, too, was hardly less prominent in the public affairs of the place, serving as the chief executive officer of the city and as a member of the city government; to another son, Otis Norton Pierce, Jr., who was long chief clerk of the Wamsutta Mills Company and of the New Bedford and Taunton Railroad Company, and has been officially identified with a number of corporations of New Bedford, being at present president of the Grinnell Manufacturing Company; to the sons of the first mentioned of these brothers, Andrew G., who are now actively carrying forward to even greater success the work of their father; to Charles M. Peirce, deceased, who was long in business in New Bedford, active and influential in municipal and legislative work; and...

Genealogy of Nicholas Baker of Scituate Massachusetts

K155 NICHOLAS BAKER: b. in England, 1610; d. in Scituate, Mass., 1678; St. John’s College, Cambridge, Eng., 1632; M.A. 1635; ordained as a minister in Scituate, and served the Puritan Church there until death; may have married his first wife in Eng.; m. (2), 1663. Samuel: 1628-1714; m. Fear Robinson; m. (2), Abigail (Lathrop) Huntington; lived in Hull, Barnstable, Norwich, Conn., Windham and Windsor, Conn. John: 1672-1763; m. Anna Annable; purchased lands in Windham County, Conn., 1643. Samuel: 1706-1791; m. Prudence Jenkins. Samuel: 1740-1812; m. Lydia Smith; m. (2), Chloe Silsby; m. (3), Sarah Farnham; established a separatist church called the “Brunswick Church”. Erastus: b. 1764. Ephraim: b. 1766; m. Phebe Edgerton Abbott; m. (2), Mary Kelsey; moved from Windham Co., to Salisbury, and then to Catskill, N. Y. Henry: moved to North Carolina before the Civil War. Charles: 1790-1853; m. Eleanor Abeel; a capt. in the War of 1812; in 1838, located in Columbus Twp., St. Clair Co., Mich. Moses Cantine: 1823-1894; m. Clarisa Thurston, moved to Oceana Co., Mich. Ch.:  Ashley Cantine: b. 1849; m. Beatrice Woodward.  Henry Woodward (b. 1887; m. Elsie Phipps), Floyd Miller (b. 1897). Frank E.: b. 1851; m. Emma Hall; d. 1907; had Clyde Harvey (b. 1882). Garrett A.: m.; in 1883 lived near Marshville, Mich. Ch.: Everett; Albert; William; Moses Cantine. Henry Augustus: m.; d. at Port Huron, Mich., 1873. Charles Nelson: 1832-1875; m. Mary E. Kenyon; served in Civil War, commissioned a Major, 1864. Ch.: Burton Sydney: b. 1865; m. Maude McNeill. Ch.: Fred Abbott: b. 1870; m. Ada Claia Lester; had Leonard Lester (b. 1898). Samuel A.: 1793-1855; m. Julia Ann...

Benjamin Woodworth, SR Family

Benjamin Woodworth, SR., b 1638, d 1728 Apr. 22. M (I) Deborah _______ Children: 3-1 Elizabeth, prob. d young. 3-2 Deborah, m Sprague. 3-3 Mary, prob. d young. M (2) Hannah ______ 3-4 Benjamin, Jr. 3-5 Ichabod. 3-6 Ebenezer, b 1691 March 12. 3-7 Amos. 3-8 Ezekiel. 3-9 Caleb. 3-10 Hannah, m _____ Walter. 3-11 Ruth, m Caleb Fitch April 4. 3-12 Judith, m Thomas Newcomb 1720 removed to Salisbury, Ct. 3-13 Margaret, m Joshua Owen, Nov. 5, 1718 3-14 Priscilla, m Amos Fuller, June 29, 1721. (Note) Elizabeth and Mary not mentioned in father’s will. (Note) Benjamin Woolworth (3) born in Scituate. In 1703 bought for 250 pounds from Phillip Smith a large tract of land in Lebanon, Ct., where many of the Scituate people settled. He moved soon after to Lebanon with his family; was admitted inhabitant Dec. 22, 1704. In deeds of lands at Lebanon he is described as Benjamin Woolworth of Little Compton, R. I. Benjamin’s (3-4) father Benjamin, is found in Lebanon, Conn. as early as 1701. Town of Lebanon, Conn. records vol. 2, page 469 says: Moses Woolworth of Norwich, Conn. to Benjamin Woolworth of Lebanon, Conn.–5 acres–in Little Compton, Bristol Co. –colony of Massachusetts Bay,–being one-third part of a fifteen acre lot which originally was Walter Woolworth’s Nov. 4, 1714. Benjamin’s farm was in the northeast part of the town. In 1714 among twenty-four signers for a new church the names of Benjamin, Ezekiel, Benjamin, Jr., Ebenezer and Mary appear. In 1716 a new church was formed called Lebanon, North Parish, and in 1804 this parish was cut off from Lebanon and...

Walter Woodworth

Walter Woodworth came from Kent Co., England, to Scituate, Mass., 1635. Was assigned the third lot on Kent St., which runs along the ocean front, at the corner of Meeting House Lane, and there he built a house. In that year he owned other land, a tract on the First Herring Brook not far below Stockbridge Mill, where afterwards stood the residence of the poet Samuel Woodworth, and another tract on Walnut Tree Hill, just west of the present Greenbush or South Scituate R. R. Station, which was in early times called Walter Woodworth’s Hill, and in 1666 he became a purchaser of sixty acres at Weymouth. In 1640 Walter was assessed nine shillings for the public use, and March 2, 1641, freeman; and in June 4, 1645, he was appointed surveyor of highways in Scituate, and again in 1646 and 1656. His name appears frequently on the town records of Scituate as juror, etc. In 2654 he was a member of the First Church, which ordained Charles Chancy as their minister. Origin of Woodward Name This ancient name of Woodward is derived from the forest keepers, the Woodwards of the Hundred Rolls in the reign of Edward 1st. The Arms used by the Woodward Family of Kent, England Richard Woodward of Woodmarsh and his son William Woodward of Ashford, Kent Co., used the old arms and crest of the family in England. ARMS: ar. a chew. Sa. betw. three grasshoppers Vert. CREST: A demi Woodman couped at the knees. Vested gu, hair dishevelled or in his dexter hand a honeysuckle of the ppr., stalked and leaved Vert. Descendants...

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