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Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Biography of Francis A. McCarty

Francis A. McCarty was one of the most remarkably successful business men who ever resided in Douglas County. He was born in Schuyler County, New York, April 23, 1837, and died at his home in Filson, May 14, 1899. He was a son of John and Laura (Frost) McCarty, natives of New England. Charles McCarty, brother of Joseph McCarty, was born at Morristown, New Jersey, in 1776, and died in Montour, Schuyler County. New York, November 15, 1858, in his eighty-third year. Joseph McCarty (grandfather) was the father of John, Charles, William and David, was born January 9, 1778, and died July 25. 1845. His wife, Mary Harnerd McCarty, was born August 15, 1774, and died January 20, 1846. John McCarty (father), son of Joseph, was born May 15, 1805, and died January 14. 1875. Joseph Frost (grandfather) was born June 4, 1797, married Sallie McCarty, and died October 27, 1847. He was a son of Joseph Frost, a soldier of the Revolution, who was burn May 22, 1754, and died May 28, 1844, at Catherine, New York. He married Lucy Couch, a daughter of Jonathan Couch, who was married September 19, 1781, died April 8, 1843, and was buried at Catherine, New York. Appended herewith is a certificate from the Adjutant General’s office of the state of Connecticut: “Hartford, September 11, 1895. This is to certify that Joseph Frost (grandfather of Francis A. McCarty) served in the war of the Revolution, and the following is his service according to the records of this office ; Private in Colonel Benjamin Hinman’s regiment. Discharged in northern department September 11, 1775....

Biography of Edward S. Smith

EDWARD S. SMITH. – The death of Edward Slade Smith, at San Francisco, California, on December 31, 1885, and incidents relating to his life gathered from recollections of Judge Charles H. Berry, Honorable John A. Mathews and Doctor James M. Cole. Edward Slade Smith was born in what was then Chemung, now Schuyler county, in the State of New York, February 28, 1827; and hence at his decease he was nearly fifty-nine years old. His parents were Joel and Anna Smith, both early settlers in Winona, Minnesota, and both of whom are now dead. There were born to them six sons and four daughters. Edward Slade Smith, the second son, gave early promise of those traits of character of that enterprise, activity, and great perseverance, which were the leading features of his life. His school advantages were not adequate to his ambitious needs in after life; but his native genius and inherent judgment seldom failed him. After a reverse in his early business career, his experiences became his best educators; and they afforded him knowledge not attainable in colleges. However, his common-school acquirements were sufficient for his business purposes; and his mind was enlightened, and his views of life broadened, by extensive reading and intercourse with the able men of the West. In 1852 he came to Minnesota. Having been previously engaged with his eldest brother, Lorenzo D. Smith, in the lumber business at Gibson, New York, he very naturally saw the advantages that the site of the Falls of St. Anthony afforded for an immense water-power and manufacturing city. There had been a small mill put up somewhere...

Biography of Norman Simon Hubbell

To the brave pioneers of the early ’60s and ’70s Idaho owes, in a large measure, the prosperity she now enjoys, as a state. Among those hardy souls and courageous hearts who then believed in her future, and by long years of toil and undaunted perseverance assisted nobly in the development of her resources, is the subject of this article; and no one is more worthy of representation in the annals of the state. The ancestors of Norman S. Hubbell were respected American citizens for many generations. He was born near Burdette, in what is now Schuyler County, New York, October 29, 1837, and his parents, Walton and Rebecca Emily (Cure) Hubbell, were likewise natives of the Empire state. The father was a millwright by trade, an excellent machinist and a good businessman. At one time he was the drum major of a militia company in his own state. He lived to reach his seventy-second year, and died, loved and respected by all who knew him. The wife and mother was summoned to the silent land when she was in her sixty-fifth year. Of their eight children but two survive. The education which N. S. Hubbell acquired was such as the public schools of his boyhood afforded, and from the time he was sixteen until he was twenty-five years of age he gave all of his earnings to his parents, reserving only what was necessary to his support. On the 12th of June, 1862, he started west from Omaha, bound for the Pacific coast, and on the 3d of the following October reached his destination at what is now...

Biography of Charles C. Davison

Charles C. Davison. who has been prominently connected with the milling industry in the state of New York for many years, is a son of Ozmer L. Davison, who came to New York from New England and spent the greater part of his life engaged in agricultural pursuits. He died at Odessa, New York, in 1900, and his wife died in 1896. Charles C., son of Ozmer L. Davison, was born in Odessa, Schuyler county, New York, June 22, 1868. He was graduated from the Odessa high school, then studied and was prepared for college at Cook’s Academy, and matriculated at Cornell University. After a few days’ attendance of the lectures at the university, finding that a life of study did not appeal to him, he accepted a position in a flour mill at Ithaca, New York, and at the end of one year returned to Odessa, where he also found employment in a flour mill and finished learning the trade of milling. He then went to Elmira, New York, remaining there for one year, and after a year and a half spent in traveling as an expert miller, he went to Trumansburg, Tompkins county, New York, where he remained one year. He again returned to Odessa, where he purchased a mill which he operated for a period of three years, then sold and went to Geneva, New York, where he opened a flour and feed store, March, 1897, which he conducted for seven years. In 1904 he bought the Geneva Flouring Mill, the oldest in the city, it having been erected in 1874. It has a capacity of...

Biography of David Bennett Hill

DAVID BENNETT HILL A PROMINENT figure in our political annals is David B. Hill, governor of the state of New York. His ancestors were of New England origin, and he was born in the beautiful and romantic village of Havana, Schuyler, then Chemung county, N. Y., on the 29th of August, 1843. His father, Caleb Hill, was a native of Windham county, Conn, but while a young man, removed to Havana, where he carried on the business of a carpenter and joiner. His mother’s maiden name was Eunice Durfey. She was a woman richly endowed with the gifts and graces of a true life. Both parents were strongly devoted to the welfare of their children and strove hard, with their very limited pecuniary means, to give them a good common-school education. These intelligent, industrious and affectionate parents, so pleasant in their lives, were not long divided in their death – Mrs. Hill died in Elmira, August, 1882. and Mr. Hill – after living to see his son elected lieutenant-governor of the empire state – followed her to the grave in December of the same year. David, the youngest son, and the subject of this sketch, was naturally fond of books and made an excellent use of the limited educational advantages afforded him by his parents. At the Havana academy, beautifully located in the open fields a short distance from the village, the young student spent several years deeply interested in his studies and laying the foundation of a good education. On leaving the academy at the age of seventeen, he cheerfully undertook the task, on a small scale, of...

Biography of William Chapman

WILLIAM CHAPMAN. – The immigration of 1847 was large, and without accident, with the exception of those unfortunate members of it who remained at Doctor Whitman’s until the massacre. Mr. Chapman belonged to the arrivals of that year, and was closely connected with the sufferers of savage fury. He was born in Schuyler county, New York, in 1824, moving to the West in 1843. In 1847 he left Havana, New York, in company with John and Ronald Crawford, traveling with them to Independence, where they separated. There he joined John Wright, traveling with him to the Kaw river, where they joined the company of John Bewley. The train was delayed by high water on the Kansas; and it was the third of June before the company was well under way, – the latest of the season. However, they overtook the Oskaloosa train, with seventy-five wagons, under Captain Smith, and with their own twenty-five made a respectable cavalcade. Some distance out they met with a singular adventure, which will sound like a mythical tale to the future generations. Camp had been made just at sunset, when one of those innumerable herds of buffalo, which once thundered over the plains, began to cross on their front. Fearful that the host of moving animals would overwhelm the camp, they set a strong guard, which also surrounded the cattle, lest they should be drawn off in the press. The buffalo herds were all night in passing; and the guards were compelled at times to give back. In the morning it was found that forty yoke of oxen had been swept away. This disabled...

Biography of George D. Shannon

GEORGE D. SHANNON. – This well-known contractor, banker and successful farmer is a man whom Nature fitted with qualities that inevitably guide their possessor to success. He was born in what is now Schuyler county, New York, December 20, 1832, and is the son of Thomas and Mehitable (Corwin) Shannon. At the age of sixteen he entered upon business for himself, and with an abundance of self-reliance began railroading, following that and other employments until 1854. Soon afterwards he came to St. Paul, Minnesota, accepting employment for a large lumber company. In 1858 he was appointed superintendent of construction of its first train, which, in 1860, he was conductor of its first train, – the first passenger train ever run west of the Mississippi in Minnesota. He followed railroading in that state until 1868, and subsequently engaged in railroad contracting in New York, Indiana and Wisconsin, completing large works on different roads in many of the Eastern states. In 1870 he came to Olympia and accepted the position of superintendent of construction for the Northern Pacific on their line from Kalama to Tacoma. In 1873 he purchased his present valuable farm containing eleven hundred acres, ten miles from Olympia, Washington Territory, all of which he maintains in a high state of cultivation, and has improved with a beautiful home, in which he is glad to entertain in his most genial way his numerous acquaintances from among the leading citizens of the Sound country, and indeed from more remote regions. In his capacity as member of the building committee to which he was appointed by Governor Ferry, he has been...

Biography of John Henry Woodward

John Henry Woodward was born at Peach Orchard in the. town of Tompkins (now Hector), Schuyler County, New York, February 9, 1836, and is the eldest son of John Woodward, who, with his father’s family came to America from London, England, in 1824, settling on a large farm in what was then comparatively a wilderness on the banks of Seneca Lake, New York, where members of the family still reside. Mr. Woodward received his primary education at the county district school. Later on he attended an academy at Peach Orchard under the management of John A. Gillette and was finally prepared for college at the Ithaca Academy, Ithaca, New York, having as classmates Eugene Schuyler, Wm. L. Bostwick, and others who have since become men of note. During his school days young Wood-ward was a leader in athletic and outdoor sports, and is still remembered by his schoolmates for his proficiency in feats requiring muscle and physical endurance. The rugged health he still enjoys, the elasticity of movement and splendid physical condition which now belie the years he has lived may be largely ascribed to his youthful love for physical exercise. After completing his preparations for a collegiate course he commenced the study of law in the office of Douglas Boardman, since Judge of the Supreme Court of New York State. A year later he went to Elmira, New York, and there continued his legal studies with the firm of Diven, Hathaway & Woods, and in May, 1860, was admitted to the bar. In the following fall he opened an office at Watkins, New York, where he speedily acquired...

Biography of Cyrus A. Dolph

Dolph, Cyrus A., of Portland, one of the most successful lawyers of Oregon, was born in Chemung, (now Schuyler) County, New York, on September 27, 1840. Leaving school at the early age of eighteen he took up the occupation of teacher, and taught in the schools of his native county during the years 1859, 1860 and 1861. In the spring of 1862 he enlisted in the Government service from which he was discharged at Fort Walla Walla, Washington, in October, 1862, and came to Portland, where he has ever since resided. While engaged in teaching, Mr. Dolph began the study of law as an accomplishment rather than with a view of adopting it as a profession, but he soon became so much interested in it that what had been taken up as a pastime he resolved to make his life work. With this end in view he began a systematic course of study and was admitted to the bar in 1866, immediately thereafter beginning the active practice of his profession. In June, 1869, without solicitation on his part, he was nominated on the Republican ticket for the office of City Attorney for the City of Portland, and was elected by a large majority over Judge W. F. Trimble, now deceased. He served for the full term of two years, and his administration of the duties of the office was eminently satisfactory to the people. In 1874, during his temporary absence from the city, he was nominated by the Republican Convention for the Lower House of the Legislature, but he declined to become a candidate. Two years later he was...

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