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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. J. G. Moore

(See Cordery and Daniel).—Stonewall Jackson Rogers, born March 21, 1867, married in July 1890 Mary Kelly, born June 30, 1870 in Tennessee. She died in February 1907, and he died Septem­ber 13, 1907. They were the parents of Frances Leeper, born in Cleveland, Tennessee, September 1, 1892, educated at Chelsea, Northeastern State Normal, and the University of Tennessee; married at Sapulpa, Oklahoma, November 4, 1916 Joseph Gar­land Moore; Robert Kelly, born January 26, 1895; Mary Louisa, graduate of Chelsea High School, 1919; Henry Curtis, born January 30, 1903, graduate of the Chelsea High School May 1921, and Rebecca Mc­Nally Rogers born June 19, 1904. Joseph Garland and Frances Leeper Moore are the parents of Eugenia Graeme, born August 4, 1918 and Joseph Garland Moore, born September 4,...

Slave Narrative of Anthony Dawson

Person Interviewed: Anthony Dawson Location: 1008 E. Owen St., Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 105 “Run nigger, run, De Patteroll git you! Run nigger, run, De Patteroll come! “Watch nigger, Watch- De Patteroll trick you! Watch nigger, watch, He got a big gun!” Dat one of the songs de slaves all knowed, and de children down on de “twenty acres” used to sing it when dey playing in de moonlight ’round de cabins in de quarters. Sometime I wonder iffen de white folks didn’t make dat song up so us niggers would keep in line. None of my old Master’s boys tried to git away ‘cepting two. and dey met up wid evil, both of ’em. One of dem niggers was fotching a bull-tongue from a piece of new ground way at de back of de plantation, and bringing it to my pappy to git it sharped. My pappy was de blacksmith. Dis boy got out in de big road to walk in de soft send, and long come a wagon wid a white overseer and five, six, niggers going somewhar, Dey stopped and told dat boy to git in and ride. Dat was de last anybody seem him. Dat overseer and another one was cotched after awhile, and showed up to be underground railroaders. Dey would take a bunch of niggers into town for some excuse, and on de way jest pick up a extra nigger and show him whar to go to git on de “railroad system.” When de runaway niggers got to de North dey had to go in de army, and dat boy from our place got...

Slave Narrative of Andrew Simms

Person Interviewed: Andrew Simms Location: Sapulpa, Oklahoma Age: 80 My parents come over on a slave ship from Africa about twenty year before I was born on the William Driver plantation down in Florida. My folks didn’t know each other in Africa but my old Mammy told me she was captured by Negro slave hunters over there and brought to some coast town where the white buyers took her and carried her to America. She was kinder a young gal then and was sold to some white folks when the boat landed here. Dunno who they was. The same thing happen to my pappy. Must have been about the same time from the way they tells it. Maybe they was on the boat, I dunno. They was traded around and then mammy was sold to William Driver. The plantation was down in Florida. Another white folks had a plentation close by. Mister Simms was the owner. Bill Simms, that’s the name pappy kept after the war. Somehow or other mammy and pappy meets ’round the place and the first thing happens they is in love. That’s what mammy say. And the next thing happen is me. They didn’t get married. The Master’s say it is alright for them to have a baby. They never gets married, even after the war. Just jumped the broomstick and goes to living with somebody else I reckon. Then when I was four year old along come the war and Master Driver takes up his slaves and leaves the Florida country and goes way out to Texas. Mammy goes along, I goes along, all...

Slave Narrative of Andrew Simms

Person Interviewed: Andrew Simms Location: Sapulpa, Oklahoma Age: 80 My parents come over on a slave ship from Africa about twenty year before I was born on the William Driver plantation down in Florida. My folks didn’t know each other in Africa but my old Mammy told me she was captured by Negro slave hunters over there and brought to some coast town where the white buyers took her and carried her to America. She was kinder a young gal then and was sold to some white folks when the boat landed here. Dunno who they was. The same thing happen to my pappy. Must have been about the same time from the way they tells it. Maybe they was on the same boat, I dunno. They was traded around and then mammy was sold to William Driver. The plantation was down in Florida. Another white folks had a plantation close by. Mister Simms was the owner. Bill Simms – that’s the name pappy kept after the War. Somehow or other mammy and pappy meets ’round the place and the first thing happens they is in love. That’s what mammy say. And the next thing happen is me. They didn’t get married. The Master’s say it is alright for them to have a baby. They never gets married, even after the War. Just jumped the broomstick and goes to living with somebody else I reckon. Then when I was four year old along come the War and Master Driver takes up his slaves and leaves the Florida country and goes way out to Texas. Mammy goes along, I goes...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Joel Mayer

Well known at Oilton and in Creek county is Mrs. Joel Mayer, who was born in Ramona, Oklahoma, on the 6th of February, 1900. She is a daughter of Reuben Bartlett and Roxie Ann (Pierson) Tuner. The former was one of the well to do old settlers of Oklahoma, important in the tribal affairs of his people in the early days, and the family has long been represented in this section of the state. The daughter, Mrs. Mayer, pursued her education in St. Francis Convent at Nevada, Missouri, and then returned to her home in Oklahoma, having since been a resident of this city. She was a young woman of but nineteen years when on the 17th of February, 1920, at Sapulpa, Oklahoma, she became the wife of Joel Mayer. She bore the maiden name of Maudine Mae Tyner and by her marriage has become the mother of an interesting little son, Joel B. Mayer, Jr. Mrs. Mayer has always lived in Oklahoma save for the period of her attendance at school in Missouri, having a very wide and popular acquaintance...

Biography of Roy L. Fruit

Roy L. Fruit, one of the progressive newspaper men of the state, is publisher and proprietor of the Sedan Times-Star, one of the oldest republican journals in the southeastern quarter of the state. The Times-Star inherits the history of half a dozen or more papers which have had their share in the newspaper history of Chautauqua County. The Chautauqua Journal was founded at Sedan in 1875 by H. B. Kelley and R. S. Turner. It was consolidated with the Sedan Times in 1885. The Cedarvale Times, founded in 1878, was removed to Sedan the same year and the name changed to the Chautauqua County Times with P. H. Albright editor and publisher. Another change of name occurred in 1901 after which it was the Sedan Times, with A. D. Dunn as publisher. As already stated it was consolidated in 1885 with the Chautauqua Journal under the name Sedan Times-Journal and with R. G. Ward editor and publisher. The Cedarvale Star was founded in 1884 by I. D. McKeehan and was consolidated with the Times-Journal at Sedan in 1894 and the name of the consolidated paper became the Weekly Times-Star. Adrian Reynolds and F. G. Kenesson were editors and publishers. Freeman’s Lance, founded in Pern in 1891 by W. A. Tanksley, was moved to Sedan in 1892, was known as the Sedan Lance, and A. S. Koonce was its editor and D. E. Shartell publisher. This was consolidated with the Times-Star in 1909. The Sedan Republican, founded in 1890 by T. B. Ferguson, was sold to the Lance in 1892. The Chautauqua County Democrat and the Chautauqua County Journal were...

Biography of Aaron Jacob Lesh

A. J. Lesh at different stages in his career had been a successful teacher, merchant, pharmacist, physician and oil refiner. He is now head of the Lesh Oil Refining Company of Arkansas City, and through his business energy and activities had contributed one of the most important local industries to this section of Southern Kansas. Mr. Lesh had been a resident of Kansas for over thirty years. For a man who had done so much on his own account it is natural that Mr. Lesh should take justifiable pride and interest in his line of worthy American ancestors. His lineage goes back to Germany. Either before or shortly after coming to America they identified themselves with that splendid sect of people known as Moravians or German Moravian, and subsequent generations of the family were Dunkards. Mr. Lesh is in the seventh generation of the family in America. Going back to the immigrant, we find him in Balthasar Loesch, as the name was spelled in its German form and as it was retained through several generations in this country. Balthasar Loesch and his wife, Susan R. Loesch, lived at Gensheim, Germany, near Worms. In 1710, not long after the close of the thirty years war, they were part of a German colony sent to America by Queen Ann. They settled in the Province of New York in 1713. There were two sons of record in the family of Balthasar Loesch: John Adam Loesch and John George Loesch. About 1723 these two sons moved to Tolpehocken District in Berks County, Pennsylvania. John George Loesch, son of Balthasar, was born in Gensheim,...

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