Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of L. A. York

The present popular editor and proprietor of the Owyhee Avalanche, at Silver City, Mr. L. A. York, is a native of Lewiston, Maine, born March 13, 1866. His parents were Jerome W. and Martha (Read) York, both natives of that city, and his father of Scotch ancestry. The first representatives of the family in America settled in Maine very early in its history. On the maternal side this ancestry is English, traceable back to Sir John Read, an English nobleman born in the year 1600. Mr. York’s father died in North Dakota, in 1894, at the age of sixty-five years; and his mother is living, being now in her fifty-eighth year. In religious faith they were Universalists. Mr. York, the subject proper of this brief biographical outline, was the second of a family of three children. He was educated in the public schools, was taken by his parents to New Hampshire, in their change of residence to that state in 1871, and to Evart, Michigan, in 1879. In 1881 Mr. York entered the Weekly Review office, at Evart, to work in the capacity of printer’s “devil,” and in the spring of 1883 left for Telluride, Colorado, where he was employed at the printer’s trade. From the fall of 1884 to the spring of 1889 he was in North Dakota. Next he returned to Colorado and then proceeded to Salt Lake City, arriving there in the fall, and there he engaged in work on the Salt Lake Tribune, as “Slug 14,” until March, 1890, at which time he severed his connection with that establishment to accept the foremanship of the...

Biography of N. P. Nielson

N. P. Nielson, treasurer of Bannock County, and a pioneer grocer of Pocatello, is a native of Denmark, his birth having occurred in that country, September 17, 1852. He was the second in order of birth in a family of two sons and two daughters, whose parents were Peter and Mary (Henson) Nielson, also natives of the same country. The subject of this sketch came to America in 1868, and four years later the rest of the family also crossed the Atlantic, taking up their residence in Utah, where the father died at the age of sixty-four years, the mother passing away several years previously. The brother of our subject is also deceased, but the two sisters are still living. N. P. Nielson acquired his education in the schools of his native land, and after coming to the United States took up his residence in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he secured a position as clerk in the old Townsend House. Later he occupied a similar position in the Keeney House, in Ogden, Utah, and in 1880 he came to Blackfoot, Idaho, where he assisted in opening a hotel, also known as the Keeney House. There he remained until 1885, when he took up his residence in Pocatello. Here he served as clerk in the Pacific Hotel for a time, but was soon afterward elected constable of the town and served in that capacity for two years, in a most efficient and acceptable manner. It was then a rough railroad town of twenty-five hundred population, and his duties were difficult and arduous, but he discharged them without fear or...

Biography of Alfred Eoff

Alfred Eoff, the able and widely known cashier of the Boise City National Bank, possesses the undaunted spirit and business enterprise which have developed and are developing the marvelous resources and wealth of the western states and territories. All credit is due the brave and fearless frontiersman who paves the way for the on-coming tide of civilization, and, by his industry and zeal opens a thousand avenues for commerce and progress. In such a work Mr. Eoff has largely aided and in the history of Idaho he well deserves representation. Of Dutch ancestry, the forefathers of Alfred Eoff settled at an early day in Wheeling, West Virginia, and one of the streets of that city is named in honor of the family. James Eoff, the father of our subject, was born in Virginia (ere that state had been divided) and in 1840 removed to the prairies of Illinois, in company with his father. When grown to maturity he married there Miss Jane Ayres, and of their five children Alfred is now the only survivor. He was born in the village of White Hall, Illinois, June 11, 1845, and received his education in the schools of Chicago. In 1862, when he was seventeen years of age, he joined an uncle in Colorado, and within a short time he became connected with the Ben Holliday Stage Company. Later he was made cashier of the Wells-Fargo & Company’s Bank at Salt Lake City, which position he filled for six years. He was then offered the place of assistant cashier of the bank in San Francisco, owned by the same corporation, and accepted...

Biographical Sketch of George N. Ifft

George N. Ifft, of the firm of Ifft & Wallin, proprietors and managers of the Pocatello Tribune, is a native of Butler County, Pennsylvania, born January 27, 1865. He began newspaper work, as a reporter, in Pittsburg, that state, and continued in that capacity and in various editorial relations in other cities, as Washington, D. C, Chicago, Denver, Salt Lake City and San Francisco, until January 1, 1893, when he came to Idaho, locating at Pocatello, and since that time he has been connected with the Pocatello Tribune, as more fully described in our sketch of that paper. Mr. Ifft is a Republican, but is one of those who have always been firm believers in silver as advocated by the people of the west generally, and as such has taken an active part in the politics of the state. William Wallin is a practical, all around newspaper man, who came to Idaho in 1893, after a service extending over a number of years in various capacities on papers in Ogden and Salt Lake...

Biography of Joseph B. Scarborough

One of the capable county commissioners of Oneida County is Joseph Brook Scarborough, of Franklin. He was born in England, September 11, 1851, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Brook) Scarborough. When ten years of age he came with his mother to the United States, crossing the Atlantic in 1861, in a sailing vessel which, after a voyage of six weeks, reached the American port. They then crossed the plains and located at Lehi, Utah, thirty miles south of Salt Lake City, and there the mother remained while the son went to Dixie, where he worked for a year on a farm for his board and clothes. In 1863 he came with the family to Franklin. The settlers were then living in little log houses, built in the form of a hollow square, the backs of the houses forming a part of the wall of the fort. Mr. Scarborough remained with his family until nineteen years of age, at which time he was happily married to Miss Mary A. Foster. He then located land for himself, built a house and began his domestic life in Franklin. Later he became the owner of one hundred and twenty-five acres of land a half-mile north of the town, and also has fifteen acres adjoining the corporation limits, while in the town of Franklin, on the principal street, he has two corner lots, on which he has built a very nice brick cottage. He has been an industrious and successful farmer and his labors have been crowned with success. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Scarborough have been born ten children, eight of...

Biography of Hon. James E. Hart

Faithfulness is the surest stepping-stone to success. Faithfulness in small things begets confidence in one’s ability to undertake more considerable tasks; and in business life, in professional life, in the church and in public affairs, faithfulness and thoroughness have carried thousands and are carrying thousands up from the day and place of small things to places of higher and still higher responsibility and honor. These thoughts have been suggested by a consideration of the successful career of the man whose name appears above. James E. Hart, clerk of the district court and ex-officio auditor and recorder of Bear Lake county, Idaho, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, January 17, 1857, descending in both lines from old English families. His parents, James H. and Emily (Ellingham) Hart, were born in England and married there, and came to America and took up their residence in St. Louis, in 1854. They had embraced the faith of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and Mr. Hart had done missionary work in England and France for seven years, under President John Taylor. He had learned the use of the French language and had been sent to St. Louis on account of the goodly percentage of French residents there, and from 1854 to 1857 had charge of a local branch of the church, as its president. He organized a colony for Utah in the year last mentioned, and was naturally chosen its captain. It was joined by others until it became a large party, which required about forty wagons to cross the plains to Utah. Oxen were their draft animals. Besides their...

Biography of William W. Woods

Idaho is fortunate in having an able bar. The importance of the legal business growing out of mining enterprises early drew to the state lawyers of ability and experience in large affairs and litigation involving big sums and values. As a result, there is at every important business center of the state legal talent which would do credit to Chicago or New York. Major William W. Woods, one of the leading lawyers of Idaho, was born in Burlington, Iowa, January 24, 1841, a son of James W. and Catharine (Wells) Woods. His father was a successful lawyer, and was born in New Hampshire in 1810, settled in Iowa in 1836 and died at Waverly, Iowa, in 1880. His mother was born in New York in 1825 and died at Burlington, Iowa, in 1864. Major Woods received an academical education at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and at nineteen began the study of law in the office and under the preceptorship of J. C. & B. J. Hall, of Burlington, Iowa. He was called from his legal studies by the demand for soldiers to protect our national interests in the civil war, and in August, 1861, enlisted as a private in Company L, Fourth Iowa Volunteer Cavalry, with which he served until September 1865, when he was mustered out, with the rank of major, after having made an admirable record as a soldier. He resumed the study of law, and in June 1866, was admitted to the bar, at Burlington, Iowa. He began the practice of his profession immediately thereafter at Sidney, Fremont county, Iowa, and remained there four years. He then...

Biography of Jacob Jones

Jacob Jones, a pioneer property-owner, merchant, farmer, blacksmith and hotelkeeper at Montpelier, Idaho, and one of the most prominent citizens of the town, was born in Breconshire, South Wales, May 14, 1825. His parents were descended from old Welsh families and his father was a Methodist, and his mother was a Presbyterian. Of their ten children he was the youngest. He was educated and entered upon the active struggle of life in his native land and there married Miss Anne Collier on the Saturday before Christmas, 1852. As early as 1846 he had been converted to the faith of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and he had done much missionary work in its behalf, as a result of which many hundreds have embraced the faith. His wife had also been for some years a convert. In the spring of 1853 only a few months after their marriage, they set out for the United States, on board the sailing ship International, from Liverpool. There were six hundred passengers, and the voyage consumed eight weeks, at the end of which time they very gladly disembarked at New Orleans, Louisiana. Mr. Jones and his brother, Henry, went to Fillmore, Missouri, where the brothers engaged for a time in contracting and building. From there Mr. Jones went with his family to Nebraska City, Nebraska, where they lived eight years. In the spring of 1863 they removed to Salt Lake City, Utah, where Mr. Jones opened a blacksmith shop, having mastered the trade in Wales and being thoroughly familiar with the work in all its details. At that time the...

Biography of Nathan Brobst

Nathan Brobst, who died May 3, 1910, was one of the sterling pioneer farmers of Shawnee County, Kansas. In a lifetime of nearly seventy years he had experiences that identified him closely with many of the interesting phases of the history of the Middle West. He was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, on a farm November 13, 1840, one of ten children, two of whom died in infancy and two of whom still survive. Their parents, Henry and Susan (Fullwieler) Brobst, were born in Pennsylvania, but moved to Ohio and took their part in the activities of the wilderness, where they developed a farm and where they spent the rest of their days. Nathan Brobst grew up with only such advantages as were supplied by the common subscription sehools of the time, and in fact gained his best education by travel, observation and experience, and by much reading. He was a great reader, and was really a student all his years. He was not a soldier in the Civil war, but one of his cousins was killed during that struggle. Following his schooling Nathan Brobst became apprenticed to the stonemason’s trade, and followed that for a number of years in connection with farming. A number of years before becoming a permanent settler of Kansas, he drove a six-mule team to Salt Lake City, and saw and experienced nearly every phase of wild western life of that time. He was a prospector for gold, was in the mining regions of Montana, and from there came down the Missouri River in boats, and on returning east had many intereeting experiences to...

Biography of James S. Acker

James S. Acker, proprietor of the general mercantile cash store, at Mountain Home, is one of the successful businessmen of the town, and his enterprise and energy have given him rank among the leading representatives of commercial interests in Elmore county. A native of Alabama, he was born near Birmingham, on the 6th of August 1865. His ancestors were natives of Holland and at an early day joined a Dutch colony that settled in South Carolina. His father, Dr. J. W. Acker, engaged in the practice of medicine throughout his business career and became a very prominent and successful physician, being for many years numbered among the distinguished representatives of the profession in Shelby County. William Acker had removed at an early day from South Carolina, in which state the Ackers were well known planters and owned many slaves. Dr. Acker married Miss Sarah Caffee, a native of Alabama, and a descendant of one of the old southern families. Her people were connected with the Baptist church, while the Ackers were Methodists in religious faith. James S. Acker is one of a family of six children, four of whom are yet living. He spent his boyhood days in the state of his nativity, attended school there and was later graduated in the commercial department of the Kentucky State University. He entered upon his business career in the capacity of a journalist, writing for the Evening Chronicle and the Birmingham Age-Herald; but circumstances caused him to enter other fields of labor and he began merchandising, for which work he is well adapted. He is a man of keen foresight, of...
Page 2 of 1012345678910

Pin It on Pinterest