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Whitson, Edward N. – Obituary

Edward N. Whitson, judge of the United States Circuit Court of the Eastern District of Washington, died at his home in this city Saturday night, following an attack of paralysis last Wednesday morning. Judge Whitson was born in Salem, Ore., October 6, 1852. His education was received in the public and high schools of that day and in Oregon College. In 1879 he was admitted to the bar. September 3, 1885, he was married to Leora Nellie Bateman at Walla Walla. He lived a large part of his life in the Yakima Valley and was prominently identified with the commercial growth and political life of that section. In 1875-76 he was auditor of Yakima County and was Mayor of North Yakima from 1886 to 1888. He was a member of the territorial legislature in 1877-78. He assumed the duties of district judge March 14, 1905, at the time of the division to this state into districts. Contributed by: Shelli...

Campbell, Inez Shelton – Obituary

Services for Mrs. Inez Campbell, 85, 1599 Market St. NE, who died Monday [March 17, 1969] at a Salem hospital, will be 2:30 p.m. Friday in Howell-Edwards Mortuary. Rev. W. Harold Lyman and Rev. Robert Hayes Mulkey officiating. Interment will be in Belcrest Memorial Park Cemetery. Statesman, March 19, 1969 Contributed by: Shelli...

Biography of Heman J. Gerr

The name of Geer is so well known in our state that the following account of the father of T.T. Geer of the Waldo hills will be of interest to all. This now venerable pioneer was born in Ohio in 1828, removing with his parents to Illinois in 1840. In 1847 he crossed the plains to Oregon with General Palmer’s train. The large company forestalled trouble with the Indians. Peter Hall, who stopped with Whitman at Walla Walla was the only one who experienced any disaster. The crossing of the Cascade Mountains by the Barlow Road proved the worst of their trials. After reaching Oregon, Heman stopped at Oregon City, and engaged in the boot and shoe business; while the father located at Butteville, Marion County. In 1848 he young man abandoned “city” life and located a claim in the Waldo hills, marrying Miss Cynthia Eoff. In 1849 he was prevented from completing the journey to California, by men returning with the report that the mines were “worked out.” From 1854 to 1861 he was in the nursery business at Silverton, and the next year in business at Salem, going thence to the Caribou mines in 1862, thence to Auburn, Oregon, and from this point with his goods to Bannack City. In 1864 he mined on the John Day river. Having separated from his first wife he made Union county his home, serving as deputy sheriff under his brother Isaiah Geer, of the newly organized Union county. In 1867 he located a fruit farm at the Cove, and formed the acquaintance of and married Miss Annie E. Duncan. He...

Biography of Rev. Josiah Lamberson Parrish

REV. JOSIAH LAMBERSON PARRISH. – This well-known pioneer, one of the few survivors of the early missionary force of Oregon, was born in Onondaga county, New York, on the 14th of October, 1806. From his father he learned the trades of blacksmithing and farming; and to them he devoted most of his time till he reached the age of twenty-four. At that time failure of his health from overwork caused him to turn his attention to the harness and saddlery trade. At about the same time he began preaching as a local preacher in the Methodist church. His field of labor was at Pike, Alleghany county, New York. In 1833 he was married to Elizabeth Winn. Two years later he closed out his business as a saddle and harness dealer, and devoted his time mainly to preaching until 1839. He was then appointed blacksmith to the Methodist Mission of Oregon by the New York board. In company with Jason Lee he came to Oregon in the ship Lausanne. The course was via Cape Horn. After reaching Oregon, MR. Parrish spent two years in blacksmithing for various missionary stations and settlers in the Willamette valley. In 1843 he was appointed missionary to the Indians at the mouth of the Columbia river. He remained there until the Mission was closed in 1846. After a short stay at Oregon City, he was appointed to the circuit on the west side of the Willamette, his field extending from Portland to Corvallis. To the arduous duties of that field he devoted himself with characteristic energy and faithfulness for nearly four years. In 1848 an...

Biography of Cornelius G. Morehead

A native of the Web foot State, the son of about the earliest pioneers of this state, raised amid its environments, both eastern and western Oregon, the subject of this article is thoroughly an Oregonian and a typical representative of its energetic and progressive citizens. Cornelius G. was born in Linn County, Oregon, on June 26, 1865, being the son of Robert M. and Martha (Curl) Morehead. The parents came with ox teams to Oregon in 1848 and settled in the Willamette valley and the father being a millwright, built the first mill of the state. It was located at Salem and was built in 1849. In 1869, the family removed to Jackson County; Oregon, and in 1872, they came to Prairie City, Grant County, this state. There the father erected the Strawberry flour mills and in 1879 sold out and Went to Weiser, Idaho. He built a mill there and in 1887 he returned to the Willamette valley, where he died in 1890. Mrs. Morehead is still living in Douglas County, this state. Our subject was educated in the schools of the various places where lie lived and in 1884 he started for himself. He raised stock in Idaho until 1888, then sold out and came to Malheur County and engaged with the Oregon Horse and Land Company, where he wrought for a number of years. During this time he made several trips to different markets with stock. In 1901 he purchased his present place, a farm of eighty acres, one and one-fourth miles west from Nyssa. His farm is well improved and produces abundance of alfalfa hay...

Biographical Sketch of Charles Smith

This worthy pioneer and substantial citizen of Malheur County, is deserving of a place in any compilation that purports to give the history of this section, since his labors have been here for many years toward the development and progress of the country, and since he is a man of ability and has achieved a goodly success as the reward of his labors and thrift. Mr. Smith was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on October 18, 1835, being the son of John and Susan Smith. At the age of eight he went with his parents to Illinois and there remained until 1854, when he came across the plains with his brothers, in an ox train, to Siskiyou County, California, and there engaged in mining. He made some good discoveries and later, 1858, went to the Cariboo mines at the time of the Fraser river excitement, whence he returned to Portland, then to Salem, and there followed his trade of brick mason. In 1878 he removed to Jackson County and remained three years and then vent to Mugginsville, California, where he mined until 188o. The next year he came to Malheur County, and located the place where he now lives as a homestead, ten miles northwest from Rockville, and devoted himself to farming and stock raising. His place is under the irrigating ditch and well improved and he has a good band of stock. Mr. Smith mines some, being interested in several good properties. The marriage of Mr. Smith and Miss Mary, daughter of John and Frances Ramsey, was solemnized in Salem, on November 9. 1865, and they have become the...

Biographical Sketch of Mary A. Miller

Mary A. Miller, familiarly know by all as “Grandma Miller”, is one of the loveable elderly ladies of our county and it is especially gratifying to have the opportunity to append an epitome of her career in this the abiding chronicles of Harney county. She is a woman of many virtues and graces and has done a noble part in the life of the pioneer and she has many friends who admire her real worth of character, her faithful life, and her own rare qualities of intrinsic worth. She is now making her home with her daughter, Mrs. Jane Poujade, who is the wife of one of the leading stockmen of Harney county and whose comfortable and commodious residence is six miles east from Harney, on what is known as Cow creek ranch. Mrs. Miller was born in Richland county, Ohio, on September 29, 1827, and at the age of eleven went with her parents to Henry county, Iowa. There she married Mr. Isaac H. Jones, on October 26, 1845. They removed to Boone county, Iowa, where Mr. Jones died on June 27, 1860. In 1862 Mr. Jones married William Miller and in 1863, with five children, they started across the plains with ox teams for the Pacific coast. The arduous and trying journey was completed when they landed in Salem. There Mr. Miller engaged in raising stock for three years and then removed to the Rogue river valley, where he continued in raising stock and farming until the time of his death, which sad event occurred on June 6, 1886. Since that time, Mrs. Miller sold the property...

Biography of John H. Moores

J.H. MOORES. – Among the immigrants who came to the Sate of Oregon in 1852 was Honorable John H. Moores, the subject of this sketch, who deserves more than passing mention for the service rendered by him to the commonwealth during an active business career in the state extending over a period of twenty-eight years. Among the older residents who played a prominent part in the earlier development of the state was his father, the late Colonel I.B. Moores, Sr., whose love of novelty and adventure brought him as one of the first pioneers to Oregon, where he located in Lane county. He was a man of great energy and activity, and had seen considerable military service, having served in the Seminole Indian war in two campaigns with Jackson in Florida. He also commanded a regiment in the Black Hawk war in 1831, and afterwards in 1846 enlisted for the Mexican war. He came to the Sate of Oregon in 1852, locating near Eugene. He represented Lane county in the legislative assembly, and afterwards in 1857 in the state constitutional convention. He was afterwards, a Republican candidate for state senator from the county. He died in 1861, and is buried in the Odd Fellows Rural Cemetery near Salem. John H. Moores was born on the 21st of June, 1821, near Huntsville, in Lawrence county, Alabama, where he remained until 1825, when his father, owing to his intense aversion to the system of slavery, and prompted by the pioneer spirit which characterized his whole life, removed from the State of Alabama to Danville, Illinois, where was spent the boyhood and...

Biography of Hon. T. C. Shaw

HON. T.C. SHAW. – This honored pioneer of 1844 was born in Clay County, Missouri, near Liberty, the county-seat, February 23, 1823. On his father’s side the stock was Scotch-Irish, and on his mother’s Welsh and English. His father, Captain William Shaw, was born in Eastern Tennessee, and belonged to a large family of that name who settled in Maryland at an early date, whence they removed into Tennessee, North Carolina and Missouri; and from the latter state the Oregon branch of the family came in the year 1844. His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Gilliam, was the sister of General Cornelius Gilliam, of fame in our early history. When T.C. Shaw, the subject of this sketch, was about ten years of age, he move to Clinton county, in the northern part of Missouri, with his father, who settled on Grindstone creek and engaged in farming and stock-raising. Here the boy also learned to be a farmer and stock-raiser, an occupation which he has never entirely abandoned. In the year 1838 the family moved into what was then called the Platte purchase, and took up their residence near the west fork of the Platte River, about seven miles south of Savannah, the county-seat. In the absence of schools in the new county, it was not possible for young Shaw to get even a common English education; and in consequence he has had the laboring oar all through life; and his present large information has been acquired wholly by his own later efforts. indeed, all his early disadvantages have been more than made up by his own native good...

Biography of Solomon M. Jeffreys

In the front rank of the columns which have advanced the civilization of the northwest, Solomon M. Jeffreys has led the way to the substantial development, progress and up building of Idaho, being particularly active in the growth of Weiser, where he still makes his home. He is numbered among the pioneers of Idaho, California and Oregon, his memory going back to the time when the entire Pacific coast was but very sparsely settled, when the Indians were more numerous than the white men, and the land had not been reclaimed for purposes of cultivation, but remained in the primitive condition in which it came from the hand of nature. Mr. Jeffreys was born in Jackson County, Missouri, February 11, 1835, and is of English lineage. His father, Thomas Jeffreys, was born in Kentucky and was married there to Miss Mary Dickerson. In 1845, with his wife and five children, he started for Oregon with a train of sixty wagons, drawn by oxen and mules, there being about two hundred persons in the company. They were nine months in making the long and tedious journey across the plains and endured many hardships and privations. Their route lay along the south and west banks of the Snake River, but they little dreamed that in the course of a few years members of their Party would locate in that beautiful district of what is now the state of Idaho. They pressed onward to the fertile Willamette valley, and the father located a “donation” claim of six hundred and forty acres of land in what became the rich County of Yamhill, Oregon....
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