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Descendants of Rev. George Shove of Fall River, MA

SHOVE. Rev. George Shove, gentleman, son of Margery, who was admitted to the church at Boston as a widow in 1638, and who subsequently was of Rowley and a proprietor and still later of Roxbury, where she married in 1654 Richard Peacock, became the third minister of Taunton, ordained Nov. 17, 1665. Of his ministerial life little is known except that be “preached acceptably,” and taught the Taunton school; and it is said that “no rumor of strife or discord in connection with him comes down to us.” His fame, however, as a land bolder and dealer in real estate bas not failed to reach us. He is represented as having been largely concerned in the secular transactions of the town and possessed of considerable wealth. He was one of the six original proprietors of Assonet Neck, when that purchase was made in 1680. His home lot was that of William Phillips, one of the first settlers on the east side of what is now High street, between Cohannet and Winthrop streets. On July 14, 1664, Mr. Shove married Hopestill, daughter of Rev. Samuel Newman, a learned man, the distinguished minister of Rehoboth. She died March 7, 1673, and he married Feb. 17, 1674-75, Mrs. Hannah Walley. She died in September, 1685, and he married Dec. 3, 1686, Mrs. Sarah Farwell. He died April 21, 1687. His mother Margery was buried at Taunton in 1680, with note that she was “mother of Mr. George Shove.” The children of Minister Shove were: Edward, born April 28, 1665 (buried Aug. 7, 1665); Elizabeth, born Aug. 10, 1666; Seth, born Sept. 10,...

Archer Family of Fall River, MA

ARCHER (Fall River family). Through much of the nineteenth century the name opening this article was a most highly esteemed and respected one at Fall River, made so by the lives of the late Jason H. Archer, M. D., of the medical profession, and his son, the late John Jason Archer, Esq., for years one of the learned members of the Fall River bar. The home at least for a time of this Fall River Archer family was in the nearby town of Wrentham, in Norfolk county, where lived Amos Archer, father of Dr. Jason H. Archer and grandfather of the late John Jason Archer, Esq. While the Wrentham vital records do not show the Archers among the town’s early inhabitants the Archers as a family were here in Massachusetts in its early Colonial period. One Samuel Archer (name spelled in the early Essex county records Arehard) was living in Salem as early as 1630, as on Oct, 19th of that year he took the freeman’s oath there. He was born between 1602 and 1615, and was a carpenter. He was a member of the First Church before 1636; was constable of the town in 1657; and marshal from 1654 until his decease. He died in December, 1667. His wife Susanna survived him, and married (second) Richard Hutchinson in October, 1668. His children, born in Salem, Mass., were: Hannah, born in Salem; Samuel, born in 1634-35, married Hannah Osgood, of Andover, and lived in 1632, married Matthew Dove, a planter of Salem, a house carpenter; John, born in 1638, married Bethiah Weeks, and lived in Salem, a cooper; Bethiah...

Descendants of Frederick Packard of Brockton, MA

FREDERICK PACKARD, late of Brockton, was not only one of the best known men in the line of shoe manufacturing in that city but also one of its most honorable and respected citizens. He ranked among the city’s most successful business men, one whose start in life was obtained by his energy and push, and these traits, combined with excellent business acumen, had long secured for him a position of affluence, and caused the firm of which he had so long been the head to become one of the best known in its line in the country. Mr. Packard was born Dec. 11, 1836, in North Bridgewater (now Brockton), son of the late Josiah and Betsey D. (Bolton) Packard, and was descended from old and sturdy New England ancestry. The following history of his branch of the Packard family is given in chronological order from the American progenitor. Samuel Packard came from Windham, near Hingham, England, with his wife and child in the ship “Diligence,” of Ipswich, in 1638, John Martin, master, there being 133 passengers on board. Samuel Packard settled first in Hingham, Mass., where he was a proprietor in 1638. Later he removed to the West parish of Bridgewater, where the first interior settlement in the State was made. He was constable in 1644, and licensed to keep a tavern in 1670. His will was probated March 3, 1684-85, from which it appears that the Christian name of his wife was Elizabeth. His children were: Elizabeth, Samuel, Jr., Zaccheus, Thomas, John, Nathaniel, Mary, Hannah, Israel, Jael, Deborah and Deliverance. Zaccheus Packard, son of Samuel, married Sarah Howard,...

Descendants of Charles Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts

For the ancestry of Charles Keith, please see Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts (VI) Charles Keith, son of Benjamin, was born Aug. 8, 1794, and married Dec. 8, 1817, Mehitable Perkins, born March 23, 1795, daughter of Josiah and Anna (Reynolds) Perkins, of North Bridgewater, both of whom were descendants of historic old New England families. To this union were born children as follows: Damaris Williams, born Oct. 8, 1818, married Vinal Lyon, of North Bridgewater, where she died; Charles Perkins, born June 20, 1820, is mentioned below; Anna Reynolds, born Nov. 11, 1822, married Theodore Lilley, of North Bridgewater, and died Jan. 28, 1882; Rhoda Perkins, born Oct. 28, 1830, married Barnabas H. Gray, of Kingston, Mass.; Sanford, born Nov. 25, 1833, died in Boston, though he lived at Louisville, Ky., where he was engaged in the shoe business, and where he married Maggie J. Harvey. Charles Keith, the father, died July 29, 1859, and the mother passed away April 22, 1863. Naturally of a “bookish” turn of mind, outdoor occupations had little attraction for Mr. Keith, and in the gratification of his tastes and inclinations farming pursuits were neglected for the less severe physical occupation of the shop. In his younger days he was evidently quite an athlete, for it is related that at the “raising” of Sprague’s Mill, Factory Village, a wrestling match was planned for the occasion, and that he was pitted against several, all of whom he overcame, when, as a last resort, Lieut. Israel Packard was brought forward to contend for the honors; after a protracted struggle he, too, was...

Establishment of Fort Gibson in 1824

By Act of Congress of March 2, 1819, Arkansas Territory was established July 4, embracing substantially all of what are now the states of Arkansas and Oklahoma; though the civil government of Arkansas Territory was limited to that section lying east of the Osage line, divided into counties, and embracing approximately the present state of Arkansas. That west of the Osage line was the Indian country, and in later years became known as Indian Territory. James Miller1 of New Hampshire was appointed the first Governor of Arkansas Territory, and among the duties of his office was that of supervision of the Indians within his jurisdiction. After the battle at Clermont’s Town an effort was made to induce the warring tribes to enter into a treaty of peace. This was accomplished in October 1818,2 in Saint Louis, in the presence of William Clark, the Governor of Missouri Territory. Directly after Governor Miller assumed his duties as executive, he was required to intervene between the Osage and Cherokee in an effort to prevent imminent hostilities growing out of the killing of a number of Cherokee hunters by a band of Osage under Mad Buffalo. In April 1820, Governor Miller departed from the seat of government at Arkansas Post, on his mission to the Cherokee and Osage. He was gone two months, and prevented temporarily at least – the threatened renewal of warfare by the Cherokee. He went first to the Cherokee settlements, where he sought to dissuade the members of that tribe from further hostilities by his promise that he would endeavor to secure from the Osage the murderers of their...

Dedham Massachusetts Historical Society Register 1890-1903

From 1890-1903, the Dedham Historical Society in Dedham Massachusetts printed a quarterly pamphlet for it’s historical society called the “Dedham Historical Register.” In this pamphlet a variety of genealogical data was published on families of Dedham and the villages emanating from the early residents of Dedham, such as Dorchester, Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Needham, and Sharon, etc.

Descendants of Mark Lothrop of Bridgewater MA

The Lothrop family, of which the late Frederick Lothrop Ames was a descendant on his mother’s side, is an old family of Massachusetts. The name Lowthrop, Lothrop or Lathrop is derived from Lowthrope, a small parish in the wapentake of Dickering, East Riding of Yorkshire, England, four and a half miles northeast from Great Driffield, and a perpetual curacy in the archdeaconry of York. The church there was an ancient institution, said to have been built about the time of Edward III., although there has been no institution to it since 1579.

Genealogy of Richard Bishop

Richard Bishop, of Salem was a husbandman. He married, first, before 1635, Dulzebella ____, who was born about 1607. She died in Salem 23 (24): 6: 1658; and he married, second, Mary Gould 22: 5: 1660. His wife Mary was born about 1611. He died in Salem 30: 10: 1674; and his widow Mary married Thomas Robbins March 11, 1674-5. Children: Mary Bishop, b. about 1635; m., first, probably, John Barnet (or Barbant) 18: 4: 1661; and, second, John Darling of Salem, fisherman, before 1680. She was living in 1686. Edward Bishop, baptized in Salem 23: 2: 1648. He was a husbandman, and lived in Salem Village until 1703, when he removed to Rehoboth, where subsequently lived, being an “innholder alias yeoman” there in 1705-6, he married Sarah Wild of Topsfield before 1685. Children, born in Salem?: Edward Bishop, born in Salem. He was a yeoman, and lived in Salem until 1711, when he removed to Ipswich, and from thence to Newbury in 1727. He married Susannah before 1706; and she was his wife in 1742. Children: Josiah Bishop, lived in Ipswich until 1727, when he removed to Newbury. Husbandman. He married Sarah Adams Feb. 7, 1716-7, at Ipswich-Hamlet; and she was his wife in 1740. She probably married, secondly, ? Fowler before 1767. Children: Bethiah Bishop, bapt. in Ipswich Dec. 15, 1717; m., first, Jonathan Moors, jr., of Newbury Oct. 16, 1741; and, second, _____ Parsons before 1767. Susannah Bishop, bapt. in Ipswich April 20, 1720. Sarah Bishop, bapt. in Ipswich Feb. 3, 1722-3; m. ____ Carter before 1767. Enos Bishop, bapt. in Ipswich Jan. 31, 1724-5; of...

The History of Miscellaneous Salem House Lots

Henry West Lot Col. John Hathorne conveyed this lot to Henry West of Salem May 19, 1699.1 Mr. West died possessed of the lot in 1703, having devised it to his son Samuel West in his will, which, though well and strong, he made, “considering the many sudden deaths that are of late,” Feb. 3, 1700-1. The son Samuel built the house that subsequently occupied the site. John Higginson Lot Col. John Hathorne conveyed this lot to John Higginson, 3d, May 18, 1699.2 Mr. Higginson erected a house upon this lot, probably after 1700, and died possessed of it. Nathaniel Hathorne Lot This was a part of Colonel Hathorne’s field, and was conveyed by him, for ninety pounds, to his son Nathaniel Hathorne, a mariner, May 19, 1699.3 Mr. Hathorne conveyed the western part of the lot to Joseph Flint Sept. 28, 1702;4 and the middle section to Mr. Flint June 26, 1704.5 Mr. Hathorne removed to Gosport, Southton county, Great Britain, and died there before 1712. His widow, Sarah, married, secondly, Nathaniel Satell of Gosport, mariner, and she conveyed, as executrix, the remaining part of the lot to Capt. William Bowditch of Salem, mariner, Jan. 7, 1712.6 John Harvey Lot Col. John Hathorne conveyed this lot to John Harvey of Salem, house carpenter, May 19, 1699.7 Oct. 5, 1708, Mr. Harvey conveyed the eastern half to John Cabot of Salem, shopkeeper,8 and the western half to John Ward of Salem, currier.9 Stephen Sewall Lot Stephen Sewall Lot. Col. John Hathorne conveyed this lot to Stephen Sewall May 19, 1699.10 Mr. Sewall conveyed it to Henry West Feb. 25,...

Estate of George Corwin House

Estate of George Corwin House, and Estate of George Corwin and Jonathan Corwin Lots. These three lots contained four acres, and were a pasture belonging to Rev. Hugh Peter, the pastor of the First church in Salem, and subsequently a regicide, early in the settlement, probably having been granted to him by the town. After his return to England, he conveyed this pasture, by his attorney, Charles Gott of Wenham, to Capt. George Corwin of Salem, merchant, July 1, 1659.1 Captain Corwin died Jan. 3, 1684-5, aged seventy-four. This pasture was divided between his son Jonathan and the heirs of his son John, who had died July 25, 1683, the former taking the western end of the pasture to the division line shown on the map, which he owned until his decease June 9, 1718. Jonathan was the judge who lived in the “witch house,” having succeeded his father there, and who sat upon the bench during the witchcraft trials. The heirs of John had the portion east of the division line. He was the older son, and probably at the time of his marriage, about 1660, his father erected for him the ancient house that stood where the Washington House is now located on Washington street. Apparently the title to the house and land remained in the father until his decease. By agreement of the heirs of George Corwin, March 31, 1685, the northern portion of the premises was assigned to John’s widow Margaret, and the southern half with the house to her elder son George, who spent the remainder of his life in it.2 Margaret probably died...
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