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Biography of Charles Clyde Myers

Charles Clyde Myers. A young lawyer of pronounced character, whether considered from the viewpoint of his professional attainments or from the standpoint of progressive citizenship, Charles Clyde Myers had been engaged in practice at Mankato since November, 1913, and is now serving his second term as attorney of Jewell County. Like many of the members of his profession he began his career as a school teacher, and his training had been thorough and comprehensive, so that while he had been in active practice for only comparatively a short period, he had already been able to take a leading place in the ranks of his vocation. Mr. Myers is one of the native sons of Jewell County who had “made good” in his home community. He was born on a farm in the Esbon community August 28, 1885, his parents being Frederick J. and Nannie A. (Pennington) Myers, the former of whom was born at Centerburg, Ohio, April 11, 1855, and a member of a family which, originating in Germany, immigrated to America during colonial times and located in Pennsylvania. Frederick J. Myers was reared in his native state, where he received his education in the public schools, and was still a young man when he came to Kansas, locating in Jewell County in 1880. Here he took up land, cleared and cultivated it, and continued to be cngaged in agricultural pursuite during the remainder of his life, his death occurring on his farm December 4, 1916. Mr. Myers was a sturdy and industrious man who won his fellow-citizens’ confldence by his integrity and straightforward business methods, and who was...

Biographical Sketch of J. Wilkes Moore

J. Wilkes Moore. Mr. Moore was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., and March 16, 1840. Received a collegiate education, graduating at Iowa State University. In 1861 he joined the First Regiment, Company G, Davenport, Iowa, and in August 1862, joined Company G, Twentieth Iowa. Was in the battles of Wilson’s Creek, Perry Grove, Vicksburg, Morgan and Mobile. Entered the service as a private and was promoted to the position of Captain. After the war he returned to Davenport, and became afterwards Marshal and Chief of Police of that city. In 1876 was a steel-blower for the Bessemer Steel Co. of Pittsburgh Edited the Davenport daily and weekly Banner in 1869-70, and in 1871 established the Douglas County (Illinois) Democrat at Arcola. In 1879 established the Salem (Kansas) Chronicle at Nelson, Nebraska, which he removed to Salem in 1882. Mr. Moore is a man of excellent principles, ability and energy, and in connection with G. W. Reede is making the Salem Chronicle a paper worthy of the largest town in the...

Biographical Sketch of George W. Reede

George W. Reede was born in Madison County, N. Y., and January 28, 1857. Received an academic education and graduated at the Albany (N. Y.) law school. Practiced his profession for a short time in his native State, removing to Salem, Kansas, in 1880, and in 1882 joined Mr. Moore in the publication of the...

Biography of Martin Van Buren Cagney

Martin Van Buren Cagney, whose home had been in Emporia for the past thirty years, is an old time printer, having first taken up the art of typography when a boy before the Civil war, and had followed his trade under many changing conditions and in many localities. For many years he had been proprietor of a commercial printing establishment at Emporia, and had also been frequently honored with positions of trust and responsibility in that city. His own career had the interest of much variety and he belongs to an interesting family. His father Maurice Cagney was born in Ireland in 1818, and became a sailor, and as a captain navigated different vessels owned in Boston. His home for many years was on the Massachusetts coast, chiefly at Salem, in which historic city his son Martin Van Buren was born June 8, 1843. In 1848 the family left Salem and removed to Chicago, where Manrice Cagney owned and operated a line of hacks and transfer wagons in that then young and vigorously growing city. He later moved to a farm twenty-two miles west of St. Louis. There he found himself in somewhat unpleasant surroundings. He owned no slaves, was opposed to the institution, but all his neighbors were slave owners and they made it so unpleasant for him that in 1855 he left the farm and went to Keokuk, Iowa, where he resumed the transfer business. During the war he removed to Kansas City, Missouri, where for the last thirty years of his life he was retired from business. His death occurred in Kansas City in 1909, when...

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