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Biography of J. W. Black

Notwithstanding the fact that Marion County, Arkansas, is well known for its efficient, faithful and energetic county officials, none deserves more honorable recognition than J. W. Black, who is the present incumbent of the county recorder and circuit court clerk’s office. He has made his home in Marion County since 1861, but owes his nativity to the Old North State where he first opened his eyes on the light March 16, 1857. His parents being James and Nancy (Burleson) Black, both of whom were born in North Carolina and came to Arkansas in 1861, locating in Marion County. The father was a soldier in the Union Army during the war, was stationed at Batesville and was there called from life in 1863. He was a Democrat politically and a farmer by occupation. His widow survived him until 1893, when she, too, passed away. They were the parents of six children: Andrew H., who died at the age of two years; Mary L., who is the wife of John B. Milum, of Powell; Jesse, who is a farmer of this county; Joseph W.; John C. is also a farmer of the county, and Martha J. is the wife of John H. Smith, of this county. The grandfather, Jesse Black, was of Scotch descent, a North Carolinian by birth, and about 1856 became a resident of Marion County, Arkansas, but died during the war in Newton County. He was the first of the family to come to this section and was followed thither by other members of the family later. J. W.Black was educated in Marion and Boone Counties and completed...

Biography of Nathan Frank Frazier

Nathan Frank Frazier. Among the names that have been long and prominently identified with the businese, agricultural, mining and financial interests of Kansas, few have attained greater prestige than that which attaches to the name of Frazier. There is hardly an industry of importance that can be mentioned that had not beneflted by the activities of the men who have borne it, and today there are found two able and worthy representatives of the family in the persons of Nathan Frank Frazier and Ray E. Frazier, vice president and president respectively of the Citizens State Bank of El Dorado and sons of the late Nathan Frank Frasier the elder, who was one of this part of Kansas’ most highly respected cltlzens, able financiers and influential men of business. To have accomplished so notable an achievement as did the elder Nathan F. Frazier in connection with Kansas banking, even though this represented the sum total of his efforts, would have been sufflcient to gain prestige and reputation for any man; but Mr. Frasier was a man of broad mental powers, strong individuality and initiative, who left not only a lasting impression in the field of enterprise mentioned, hut was also a most potent factor in the commercial and agricultural development of Southern Kansas, while his activities also invaded the states of Missouri and Oklaboma and made him nearly squally as well known there. He was a native of Iowa, born on his father’s farm in Henry County, near the Town of Salem, October. 13, 1846. a son of Francis H. and Lydia (Fisher) Frazier. The father was a native of...

Biography of Ervin W. Johnson

For many years actively connected with the development and progress of different sections of this state, Mr. Johnson is now the proprietor of the Overland Hotel, in Boise, and is regarded as one of the most popular and best known citizens of Idaho. A native of Ottumwa, Iowa, he was born March 17, 1857, a son of William W. and Eliza A. (Myers) Johnson. His father, a native of Indiana, born in 1829, died in Ottumwa, Iowa, in 1867, and his wife, who was born in Botetourt County, Virginia, also departed this life in Iowa. By profession Mr. Johnson was a portrait-painter and sketch artist. In 1852 he went to California, but after two years returned to Iowa and was for some time engaged in the hotel and mercantile business in Salem, that state. In 1858 he joined a company bound for Pike’s Peak, but later again returned to Iowa, and at the outbreak of the civil war he enlisted in the Seventh Iowa Infantry, as a private. In the first engagement in which he took part, the battle of Belmont, he was seriously wounded, the injury resulting in his death a few years afterward. Having been wounded, he was taken to Camp Butler, Illinois, and it was there, after his partial recovery, that he painted the first panorama of the war. He thus delineated many of the noted engagements of the Rebellion, including the naval battle between the Monitor and the Merrimac. These pictures were done in oil and were eight by twelve feet in dimensions. He also painted the portrait of Richard Yates, the war governor of...

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