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Biography of George Ewing

George Ewing, commonly called during his residence in the county Lieut. Ewing, was, it is believed, the first white settler within the bounds of what is now Ames township. A native of Salem, New Jersey, he entered the continental army at the beginning of the revolutionary war, and served with credit during its whole course. For his bravery and good conduct he received, soon after entering the service, a commission as first lieutenant of the Jersey Line, which position he held till the return of peace. Shortly after the conclusion of the war he emigrated to what is now Ohio county, West Virginia, which then constituted the very frontier of civilization, and was, with the surrounding region, the scene of many a bloody conflict between the “LongKnives” and the red men. After a few years’ residence here he removed with his wife and young family, in 1793, to the Waterford settlement, on the Muskingum river, where he passed a year or two in the block house, until the danger from Indian attacks, then imminent, had passed. In the spring of 1798, Lieutenant Ewing, encouraged and assisted by Judge Cutler, removed his family to a place seventeen miles northwest of the frontier settlements, in what is now Ames township, and became the pioneer of that section of country. He settled on what is now known as the Thomas Gardiner farm. During the period of his residence here he was an active supporter of schools and every means of developing and improving the community. He was chosen township trustee at the first election, in 1802, and in after years filled that...

Biographical Sketch of Virgil P. English

English, Virgil P.; physician; born, Salem county, N. J., Jan. 8, 1858; son of Enos P. and Mary Finlaw English; public school education; admitted to Kansas bar, 1883; graduated Phrenol. Institute, New York, 1886; M. D., Homeopathic Hospital Medical College, Cleveland, O., 1892; married, Minnie Ghent of Frankfort, Ind., March 5, 1891; taught school for several years;¬†practiced law a short time; traveled from New York to Los Angeles, lecturing on phrenology, hygiene, etc., 1886-1892; in practice as specialist, nervous diseases and diseases of women, since 1892, propr. Ohio State Pub. Co., Power & Poise Pub. Co.; editor Power and Poise (magazine); Republican, member Human Culture Society (pres. since 1908). Author The Doctor’s Plain Talk to Young Men, 1895; The Mind and Its Machinery, 1901; The Doctor’s Plain Talk to Young Women, 1902; Mental Physical Culture, 1906; has written a number of booklets relating to life and its...

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